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Low Carb But Not In Ketosis

Lchf & Ketosis

Lchf & Ketosis

This post is also available in: Danish WHAT IS KETOSIS? Ketosis is a metabolic state in which your body uses fat as primary fuel. Since the brain cannot use fat in its original form as fuel, the fat is converted into ketone bodies. This happens in the liver. The brain as well as all other cells in the body functions very well on ketone bodies instead of glucose. However, the brain still needs 20 g of glucose every day. Since we still eat carbohydrates on LCHF/keto, this is no problem. Should we chose to eat NO CARBS whatsoever, the body will provide these 20 g of glucose through a process called gluconeogenesis. Ketosis is also a metabolic state that naturally decreases your appetite and makes weight loss almost effortless. But being in ketosis is no guarantee for weight loss and you can also lose weight without being in ketosis. Confused? Intrigued? Let’s take a closer look! HOW TO GET IN TO KETOSIS? The way to get your body to go into ketosis is by eating very few carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and lots of fat. Ketosis occurs when insulin levels are low which is why carbs but also protein must be limited. Remember that protein can also spike insulin! My personal experience is that I need to keep my diet pretty strict for a couple of days or maybe a week to get into ketosis. Once in ketosis, I don’t need to watch my diet as closely and that allows for more carbs. I’ve been eating a low carb diet for many years so maybe my body is just very well adapted but I have eaten up to 100 g of carbs (even from dates and rice) and stayed in optimal ketosis (see below). I can also drink a glass of wine or two. But this is my experience, you need to find the way your body responds. Most people will need to lower their carb intake to 20-30 g to get into deep ketosi Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Is Your Low-carb Diet Giving You Ketosis Breath?

Is Your Low-carb Diet Giving You Ketosis Breath?

One of the possible "side-effects" of following a low-carb diet (be it the Atkins Diet, South Beach Diet, or any other low-carb diet plan) is "bad breath", sometimes accompanied by a bad taste in the mouth. This is distressing, of course, but don't think you're condemned to live with it! Causes There are many causes of bad breath, but if the change in your breath happened suddenly after starting a low-carb diet there are two main causes: 1) bad breath due to acetone caused by ketosis, and 2) an excess of protein in the diet producing ammonia in the breath. Bad Breath from Ketosis ("Keto-Breath" or "Ketosis Breath") One of the results of cutting carbohydrates in our bodies is that we start to use more fat for energy. This process generates molecules called "ketones." One type of ketone, called acetone, tends to be excreted both in the urine and the breath. The description of the smell varies, but it is often described as "fruity" or like the smell of apples which are "past their prime" (or even downright rotten). The good news is that keto-breath usually doesn't last forever. Most people find it dies down after a few weeks or at the most a few months. The reason is unclear, but it seems our bodies adapt in some way. Children on a ketogenic diet for epilepsy have been shown to have less acetone in their breath as time goes on, for example. In the meantime, there are things you can do to minimize the impact of "keto-breath": Drink more water: try 8 glasses per day to see if this helps, and then you can experiment from that point. Natural breath fresheners to try include mint, parsley or other greens, cloves, cinnamon, and fennel seeds. Some people swear by breath capsules, which are usually made from parsley oil (e.g. Mint Assure) for keto-breath. Others find they do not h Continue reading >>

What Can You Eat?

What Can You Eat?

You might be surprised to learn just how diverse and delicious a low-carb diet can be. Depending on the state of your current diet, it may take a little getting used to, but a low-carb / ketogenic diet shouldn't feel like deprivation. Throughout this site, I use the terms “low carb” and “ketogenic” equally, but they aren’t always the same thing. A low-carb diet may mean different things to different people. You may find that certain health symptoms resolve when you eat fewer than 125 grams of carbohydrates per day. Other individuals — for example, people with type 2 diabetes — may need to limit their daily carbohydrate intake to below 25 grams in order to start experiencing benefits. The extent to which you decide to limit your carbohydrate intake depends on your health status and your individual goals. A ketogenic diet, however, is typically characterized by consuming very low carbohydrate levels with the intent of achieving nutritional ketosis — a state where your body shifts from using carbohydrates as its primary form of energy to using fat. A ketogenic diet consists of low carbs, high fat, and moderate protein. The typical macronutrient breakdown for a ketogenic diet is 5% carbohydrates, 75% fat, and 20% protein. 5 % 75 % 20 % When we talk about carbohydrates, it’s important to remember there are different kinds: simple carbohydrates (like those in sugar, bread, and pasta), and complex carbohydrates, which are found in vegetables. If I can teach you one thing, it would be this: please don't think that going low-carb means you can’t eat vegetables. Your body needs the vitamins and nutrients found in vegetables and leafy greens to be healthy. You simply can’t get the same benefits from a multi-vitamin. One of the reasons I started this website i Continue reading >>

Why High Levels Of Ketones Does Not Equal Greater Weight Loss

Why High Levels Of Ketones Does Not Equal Greater Weight Loss

2 0 In a previous posting, I spoke through the different ways in which you can measure the level of ketosis in the body. One of the points that I brought up is this notion that exists in the keto world of people being told or believing that a higher ketone reading automatically means you will experience a greater rate of weight loss. The point I stated before and I want to repeat again is a classic misinterpretation of cause and effect in that: “Just because you have a high ketone level in the body, does not mean that you will automatically experience a fat/weight loss.” I’ve been working with the application of a ketogenic diet for over 8 years now and where this notion came that high ketones=greater weight loss, I’m not too sure. Over the past couple of years though with the explosion in the popularity of a ketogenic diet, it is becoming more prolific especially amongst many keto online groups. I have had clients come to me in the past before looking for help with their diet. They have followed many “experts” advice online and it has lead them down a path of believing that the only way to success with this form of diet is all about upping the fat, driving the carbs and the protein down as much as you can. Some people coming to me were consuming as much as 80% or even 90% of their diet as fat. Now unless you have a specific therapeutic reason for following a ketogenic diet or if you really feel like that is the optimal diet for you, not many people need to be eating this much fat. Also, if you are someone that is looking to follow this diet especially for weight loss, then I promise you, adding more fat above what your body needs is going to cause you to gain, not lose weight. Where I really see this occurring, is when people are struggling to lose weight o Continue reading >>

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

A lot of people are confused by the term “ketosis.” You may read that it is a “dangerous state” for the body, and it does sound abnormal to be “in ketosis.” But ketosis merely means that our bodies are using fat for energy. Ketones (also called ketone bodies) are molecules generated during fat metabolism, whether from the fat in the almonds you just ate or fat you were carrying around your middle. When our bodies are breaking down fat for energy, most of it gets converted to energy, but ketones are also produced as part of the process. When people eat less carbohydrates, their bodies turn to fat for energy, so it makes sense that more ketones are generated. Some of those ketones (acetoacetate and ß-hydroxybutyrate) are used for energy; the heart muscle and kidneys, for example, prefer ketones to glucose. Most cells, including the brain cells, are able to use ketones for at least part of their energy. Is ketosis a bad thing? There is an assumption that if a body is burning a lot of fat for energy, it must not be getting “enough” glucose. However, there is no indication, from studying people on reduced carbohydrate diets, that this is the case (though there is usually a short period of adjustment, less than a week, in most cases). It takes about 72 hours to burn up all of the reserve glycogen (sugar loads). Although it’s true that our bodies can’t break fat down directly into glucose (though, interestingly, they easily use glucose to make fat), our bodies can convert some of the protein we eat into glucose. Indeed, this works well for people who don’t tolerate a lot of sugar, because this conversion happens slowly so it doesn’t spike blood glucose. What is the danger of ketosis? It is important that if you are following a ketogenic nutritional pro Continue reading >>

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips

10 Critical Ketogenic Diet Tips A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. This leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). I personally recommend a cyclic ketogenic diet for most of my clients where you go low-carb for 3 days and then have a slightly higher carbohydrate day, followed by 3 lower carb days. This cycles the body in and out of a state of ketosis and is beneficial for hormone balance while keeping inflammatory levels very low. The biggest challenge with this nutrition plan is to get into and maintain the state of fat adaption. Here are several advanced tips to get into and maintain ketosis. 1. Stay Hydrated: This is considered a no-brainer, but is not easy to follow. We often get so busy in our day-day lives that we forget to hydrate effectively. I recommend super hydrating your system by drinking 32 oz of filtered water within the first hour of waking and another 32-48 oz of water before noon. I have most of my clients do a water fast or eat light in the morning doing smoothies or keto coffee or tea. So hydration around these dishes should be well tolerated by the digestive system. In general, aiming to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water and closer to your full body weight in ounces of water daily will help you immensely. I weigh 160 lbs and easily drink 140-180 ounces of water each day. Sometimes more in the summer time. As you begin super Continue reading >>

Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up And Read Further

Not Losing Weight On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up And Read Further

The ketogenic diet is not only known to be one of the most effective weight loss tools, but has proven to have many health benefits. Ketosis is a state at which your body produces ketones in the liver, shifting the body's metabolism away from glucose and towards fat utilization. Unless you can check your blood ketones, using Ketostix is an easy way to detect urinary ketones. It's not the most accurate method, but may be good enough to find out whether you are in ketosis. In some cases, weight loss may be difficult even on a low-carb ketogenic diet and there may be a few possible reasons for weight stalling, which I have listed in this post. If you want to know more about the ketogenic diet and how it can help you lose weight, have a look at my Practical Guide to Keto Diet which is freely available on my website also as PDF. 3 free diet plans to help you kickstart your diet, lose weight and get healthy Recipes, giveaways and exclusive deals delivered directly to your inbox A chance to win the KetoDiet app every week Top Reasons You Are Not Losing Weight on a Keto Diet 1. Carbs are Too High Your carbohydrate intake may be too high. Try to decrease your daily carbs limit. Also try to include coconut oil in your diet. Coconut oil consists of MCTs (Medium chain triglycerides), which are easily digestible, less likely to be stored by your body and are used for immediate energy. MCTs are converted in the liver into ketones, which helps you enter ketosis. If you want to know more about carbs, check out this post. For more about ketones, have a look at this post. 2. Protein is Too High or Too Low Your protein intake may be too high/ low. Protein is the most sating macronutrient and you should include high-quality animal protein in your diet. If you don't eat enough protein, you Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Quick Start Keto

Quick Start Keto

Low carbers know ketosis is the superhero of fat-burning. But what is ketosis? And how do you get into ketosis quickly? Keto FAQs and why it makes a difference in fat loss. 6 techniques to get into ketosis fast 3-Day rapid reach ketosis technique Try a few rapid keto techniques and eat specific low carb keto foods. Our quick start guide covers everything you need to reach ketosis fast. If carbs are limited to small amounts in your diet, your body relies on fat for energy. When you reach ketosis, fat burns rapidly and muscle tissue is spared. Why Does Keto Burn Fat Faster? To get into ketosis you’ll avoid sugar, leading to low insulin levels. Low insulin curbs hunger and accelerates fat-burning. Metabolizing fat and producing ketones burns more energy than metabolizing carbs. The result is a much higher calorie burn. How Do I Reach Ketosis? Ketosis happens when carbs are very low – usually when eating 20 to 50 grams of net carbs or less per day. (Carb grams from fiber are NOT counted in daily totals.) Everyone is different. Some low carbers must eat very low carb to reach ketosis. Typical Keto Ratio Getting into ketosis requires eating meals that are high in healthy fats and low in carbs. Protein grams should not exceed 20 % of total daily calories. Keto Calculator This free online keto calculator determines your ideal nutrient ratio for weight loss or maintenance during ketosis. The keto calculator recommends the optimum daily calories, fat, carb and protein amounts to help you get into ketosis – and meet your weight loss goal. How to Know You’re in Ketosis Keto Symptoms During keto, low carbers experience bursts of energy and heightened mood – just two of the big benefits of ketosis. Some dieters notice a temporary, sweet taste in the mouth or a mild, sweet b Continue reading >>

Ketones And Ketosis

Ketones And Ketosis

According to Owsley “The Bear” Stanley This is not a dedicated nor complete article, this page is an extract from Owsley’s correspondence with others. See this page for more info. A zero carb diet does NOT cause ketosis. The body rapidly adapts within a few weeks and begins consuming the ketones from fat metabolism. A fully keto-adapted body excretes no ketones in the urine. A metabolic by product, ‘ketone bodies’ are actually a special kind of carb, and they substitute for glucose at the structures which use it. They have the added advantage of making you feel good- and well fed. Ketone metabolism is not a ‘rapid response mechanism’. Full keto-adaptation takes several weeks, and until that has been done, a slowly reducing level of ketones will spill into the urine. Once adapted, the ketones are barely present in the urine, having been used by the body (in place of glucose). You will not show ketones in your urine if there are carbs in your diet, the ketones are reprocessed- into bodyfat. Your body ONLY burns FAT for muscular work, and it burns fat all the time, 24/7. Ketones do not appear in the urine until all carbs are stopped and then the ketones will disappear again in a few weeks as your body begins using them as glucose-replacement rather than converting them, as it does all carbohydrates, into bodyfat (from which they came). BOTH a keto-adapted and carb-eating person will show no ketones in the urine. SOME people have a problem with fat metabolism while insulin is present, and glucose being converted into bodyfat, but not everyone, which is why some (a few) people do not become fat or obese no matter what they eat. Those who have a problem find any effort very hard and may fall asleep until the fat storing process is over. Ketones are a valuable nu Continue reading >>

From Dr. Josh Axe, Dnm, Dc, Cns

From Dr. Josh Axe, Dnm, Dc, Cns

The ketogenic diet (or “keto,” for short) is a very low-carb diet that has been used by doctors since the 1920s to help their patients heal from diseases including epilepsy, high cholesterol, and, of course, obesity. In fact, research shows that the keto diet is one of the most effective dietary approaches for encouraging weight loss, in addition to preventing neurological disorders and normalizing blood sugar levels, thus offering protection against conditions like diabetes. Unlike most diets that focus on calorie restriction as a means of weight loss, the goal of the ketogenic diet is to cut off the body’s supply of glucose from carbohydrates. While low-carb diets like the Atkins Diet have been popular for many years, not everyone is able to achieve the results they’re looking for. As a result, some who have tried a moderate low-carb diet may find that transitioning to a the stricter keto diet can finally help them to reverse symptoms they’ve been dealing with for years, including stubborn weight loss or fatigue. But there is certainly no “one size fits all” dietary strategy that will work well for every person. To help you decide which type of low carb diet might be the best fit for you, here are five key differences between the keto diet and most other low-carb diets: 1. Only Keto Puts You into Ketosis Low carb diets and the ketogenic diet have similar positive affects on the body’s ability to burn stored body fat. However, only the keto diet will put you into a true state of “ketosis.” Ketosis is the metabolic state in which ketone bodies are used for fuel, rather than glucose—which is typically provided by high-sugar and high-carb foods, and is the body’s preferred source of energy. When the body relies on fat for energy, this fat comes fro Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

Have you just started a low-carb diet? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted and overcome by tiredness? Perhaps you are thinking that going low-carb wasn’t a good idea after all… You might already know that these symptoms are not uncommon, especially if you are doing low-carb for the first time. Also known as “low carb flu” or “Atkins flu”, this phase is completely normal – although by no means pleasant. This condition occurs when you cut your carb intake sharply, to about 20-30g a day, in order to induce ketosis. What is low-carb flu? Your body is used to running on carbs. It’s been operating this way for decades. Cutting carbs in favour of fat is a huge change for your metabolism. Your body needs some time to adjust to this change. This period of adjustment can sometimes cause flu-like symptoms. Fatigue is the most common one, but you could also get muscle cramps, headaches, dizziness and mental fog. Some of these symptoms are markers of sugar withdrawal. Sugar addiction is real and common, so trying to break away can be difficult. Low-carb flu is not actual flu Please note that “low carb flu” does not include fever or respiratory cold-like symptoms such as coughing or sneezing. If you are experiencing any of these, it means that you might have actually caught an infection! So it would be a good idea to postpone starting your diet until you are all clear. How can you fight tiredness and other symptoms of low-carb flu? First of all, remember that it won’t last forever. Low-carb flu usually lasts around 3-5 days (although could be 1-2 weeks for some unlucky people with high metabolic resistance). Here are some simple tips on making this transition easier. 1) Eat more fat Fat is the key to this whole issue. You must eat lots of it – a lot more th Continue reading >>

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

Ten Reasons You Are Not Losing Fat On A Low-carb Diet

“” —Passmore & Swindells, two British dietitians writing in the British Journal of Nutrition in 1963 Whether you agree with the above quote or think it’s hilarious nonsense, there’s no doubt that reduced carb diets are useful for losing body fat. A lot of people find that cutting carbs in favor of a higher protein, higher fat diet is the simplest way to get lean fast. However, people often make mistakes when going low-carb, especially if they are training hard in an effort to accelerate the fat loss process. With these 10 simple tips, you can make going low-carb a lot easier and get better fat loss results. Mistake #1: Not Restricting Carbohydrates Enough Low-carb, high-protein diets are effective for fat loss. This is a scientific fact. But, low-carb is a vague term. Simply cutting the average American man’s carb intake of 310 grams a day in half could be considered low-carb, but if you are overweight and your goal is fat loss, you most likely need to go a lot lower than 155 grams. A review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests the 50 to 150 g/day range is too high for losing body fat in overweight, sedentary populations. A useful definition of a low-carb fat loss diet is less than 50 grams of carbs a day, which will lead to the production of ketones. When the body is producing ketones it is no longer relying on glucose (sugar from carbs) for its fuel source, which is a state that provides significant metabolic benefits and easier fat loss. Fix It: For best results, get those 50 grams of carbs from vegetables and select fruits, such as berries, or other low-carb fruit. Eliminate all grains—whole and processed. Mistake #2: You are Lean, Active & Restricting Carbs Too Much The AJCN definition of a low-carb diet as less than 50 grams a day w Continue reading >>

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

Reduce fat intake? On a low carb or ketogenic diet? Amy, have you done lost yo' mind? You know people use the abbreviation “LCHF,” right? And that means low carb high fat, right? I’ve heard from many, many people who are struggling to lose body fat on a low carb or ketogenic diet. And while there are many possible reasons for this, the simplest, most obvious, and most common one is, they’re eating too darn much fat. What is this madness you speak of? This is possible. It is, as they say, “a thing.” Remember: when you reduce your carbohydrate intake to the point that your body must switch over to running primarily on fat for fuel, you go from being a “sugar burner” to being a “fat burner.” But what this means is that you’re burning fat. It doesn’t mean that the fat you’re burning will automatically and unfailingly come from your love handles and thunder thighs adipose tissue (your stored body fat). It could be coming from your fatty coffee, avocado smoothie, fat bombs, or a heavier-than-you-realize hand with nuts, cheese, and ranch dressing. Bottom line: the more fat you eat, the less of a need your body has to tap into its stored fat to use for fuel. If you’re already lean and happy with your weight, this is no problem. You might need a bunch of fat just to maintain your weight. (I hate you. Lucky you.) But if you’re struggling with fat loss on low carb despite doing “all the right things” and being on-point with your diet, there’s a chance you’re simply overdoing the dietary fat. It’s true. If your carbs are very low, then insulin will be pretty low, which is what allows you to get into “fat burning mode.” But just because insulin is low doesn’t mean you’ll magically drop body fat regardless of how many calories you take Continue reading >>

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