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Low Blood Sugar When Dieting

Balance Your Blood Sugar, Keep Off The Weight

Balance Your Blood Sugar, Keep Off The Weight

Balance Your Blood Sugar, Keep Off the Weight Learn how stabilizing your blood sugar will help you lose weight and keep it off! Guess what percentage of dieters keeps the weight off for more than two years: 75%? 60%? 50%? The sad truth is only 15-20% of dieters keep the weight off, with 80-85% of people who lose weight regaining it (plus some!) after two years. Its time to shift your mindset when it comes to dieting. By focusing less on fads and more on maintaining a healthy balance of what you eat, youll impact your body on a level most diets dont even consider: Stabilizing your blood sugar. Your blood sugar level is the amount of glucose from what you eat thats circulating in your bloodstream to provide energy to cells immediately or be stored for future use. A well-balanced blood sugar level is crucial to your overall fitness and well-being, regulating your hormones, triggering your body to burn stored fat, and increasing your metabolism to help you lose weight. Unfortunately, most peoples blood sugar is not properly balanced. If youre getting too much glucose, it leads to high blood-sugar levels, which your body cant break down and stores as fat. Ironically, not getting enough sugar can also lead to putting on extra pounds! Eating too little glucose can lead to a low blood sugar level, causing your body to go into starvation mode where it burns your lean muscle instead of the fat a double whammy to your system and your diet. Fortunately, nutritionist Mark MacDonald and Dr. Oz have a 6-step plan to balance your blood sugar, allowing you to lose weight and keep it off! Whats the key to eating in 3s? Its easy! Eat every 3 hours, and divide your plate into thirds: one-third protein,one-thirdfat, andone-thirdcarbs. Our bodies want to eat every 3 hours, as its their natu Continue reading >>

I Have Low Blood Sugar - What Should I Eat?

I Have Low Blood Sugar - What Should I Eat?

The question: I have been diagnosed with low blood sugar. Is there a special diet I should follow? The answer: There isn't a specific diet for low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, but there are dietary modifications that can help prevent reactions altogether. I have developed meal plans for many clients with hypoglycemia who now experience no symptoms at all. Hypoglycemia can be a concern for people with diabetes taking certain blood sugar-lowering medications, but it can also affect people who don't have diabetes. Symptoms can include headache, shakiness, weakness, rapid heartbeat, anxiety, confusion and blurred vision. Diet isn't the underlying cause of hypoglycemia, but altering what you eat – and when you eat – can prevent your blood sugar from dropping too low if you're susceptible to the condition. My goal with clients is to prevent hypoglycemia from happening in the first place. And to do that, it's important to ensure glucose enters your bloodstream at a steady, even pace throughout the day. It's critical to eat every two to three hours to prevent your blood glucose from falling too low. Don't skip meals and include a snack midmorning and midafternoon. Be sure to carry snacks with you to prevent a hypoglycemic episode when you are away from home. Meals and snacks should also include carbohydrate-rich foods with a low glycemic index (GI), which means they're digested slowly and, as a result, converted to blood glucose gradually. Low GI foods include bran cereals, large flake and steel cut oatmeal, stone ground whole wheat, pasta, milk, yogurt, soy beverages, apples, pears, oranges, dried apricots, nuts and seeds, and legumes. Your meals and snacks should also include a source of protein to moderate swings in blood glucose. Lean meat, poultry, fish, low fat chees Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Diet

Hypoglycemia And Diet

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is a relatively rare condition. The symptoms include shakiness, weakness, faintness, headaches, mental dullness, and confusion. Such symptoms can be caused by any number of other problems, including stress. The only way to diagnose hypoglycemia is through a glucose tolerance test—the same type of test used to diagnose diabetes. Effects of Hypoglycemia Glucose is a type of sugar found in the blood. Eating a meal causes blood glucose levels to rise. Normally, as levels of glucose in the blood increase, the pancreas produces insulin. The insulin causes body cells to absorb the glucose and a gradual drop in the blood sugar level results. In a person with hypoglycemia, the body produces too much insulin in the presence of glucose. This causes a sudden drop in the blood sugar level. The High-Protein Myth Doctors used to recommend eating sugar-restricted, high-protein meals four or more times a day to help control hypoglycemia. But such treatment may actually impair glucose tolerance in patients.1 The main sources of protein for many individuals—animal products—are also high in saturated fat which can contribute to the development of diabetes,2,3 as well as numerous other health problems, from heart disease to breast cancer. Hypoglycemia and Diet The best way to control hypoglycemia is through a diet similar to that used to control diabetes mellitus: a reduction in simple sugars, a large intake of complex carbohydrates, and frequent feedings. Candy, sodas, and even fruit juices (which manufacturers often sweeten with lots of sugar) are all high in sugar and should be avoided. Foods that are high in soluble dietary fiber slow carbohydrate absorption and help to prevent swings in blood sugar levels. For som Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia The Truth About Diet And Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia The Truth About Diet And Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia the truth about diet and low blood sugar In this article, I dont intend to get into a detailed medical explanation of hypoglycemia because it is complicated and somewhat controversial. However, in simple terms it is caused by overactivity of the pancreas which produces too much insulin when sugar or sweet foods are eaten in the diet. In a healthy person, the pancreas produces just enough insulin to neutralise any sugar eaten, to bring the blood sugar back to normal. But in those with hypoglycemia, the pancreas overreacts and produces too much insulin in response to the sugar eaten. This over-abundance of insulin metabolises not only the sugar which has been eaten but also some of the glucose which was already present in the bloodstream. Do you have the symptoms of hypoglycemia? The result is a state of low blood sugar which can cause an alarming number of distressing symptoms -fatigue being only one of them. Other symptoms include headaches, dizziness and feeling faint, irritability, depression, difficulty in remembering, blurred vision and in most cases an overwhelming craving for something sweet or a stimulant such as tea or coffee. If any of those symptoms sound familiar, particularly if they are accompanied by a craving for sweet food, then it is very likely you are suffering from hypoglycemia. Strenuous exercise also lowers the blood sugar, which is why those with hypoglycemia should be careful not to over-do any physical activity. After heavy physical work, a healthy person feels tired, his energy has been drained. However, if he rests, his strength will return reasonably quickly. What has happened? The exercise has burned up part of the glucose in the blood. Stored glycogen in the liver is then used to bring the blood sugar level back to normal even Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Dieting And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Dieting And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

If you have been dieting in order to lose weight, food and nutrition restriction may be part of your overall diet plan. It is not healthy to restrict your body of vital nutrients and fluids as this can lead to dehydration and bouts of low blood sugar. If you are dieting and experience symptoms of low blood sugar, make sure you have the right food handy in case your levels drop low. Video of the Day Hypoglycemia is caused by low levels of blood sugar in the blood stream. Your body needs blood glucose in order to carry glycogen to cells for energy. This energy is used to keep the body moving through organ function and muscle activity. One way to get instant energy into the bloodstream is to eat raw sugar or glucose. Within minutes, your body will be replenished and your energy levels should return. Examples of foods you can take if you feel your blood sugar drop are raw sugar, corn syrup, juice, soda or crackers. Hypoglycemia can be caused by not getting enough to eat. If you severely restrict your caloric intake, you are not getting enough nutrients in your blood stream. This can worsen if you participate in rigorous workout activity that can use up your energy supplies much faster. If you are diabetic and are on a diet that restricts carbohydrates and sugar, you may also experience hypoglycemia. If you take insulin to manage your diabetes, you may find drops in your blood glucose levels, resulting in low blood sugar symptoms. Low blood sugar can bring about an array of symptoms. Initially, you may feel dizzy or lightheaded. Muscle tremors or shaking may also occur. This is an obvious symptom and can get worse as your blood sugar level drops. You may also have a bad headache along with confusion or difficulty concentrating on the task at hand. Extreme hunger is also a si Continue reading >>

What To Eat For Hypoglycemia

What To Eat For Hypoglycemia

In this article, we list meal plans for people with hypoglycemia, as well as other tips for managing the condition. What is hypoglycemia? People with persistent low blood sugar may have hypoglycemia. Having low blood sugar is often associated with diabetes, but it is possible to experience hypoglycemia without having diabetes. Other common causes include hormonal deficiencies, critical illnesses, and excessive alcohol consumption. When blood sugar drops within 4 hours of eating a meal, a person may be experiencing reactive hypoglycemia. This condition is caused by excessive insulin production after eating. Hypoglycemia symptoms including: trembling feeling weak or faint feeling mentally sluggish confusion feeling tearful heart palpitations turning pale blurred sight tingling lips Breakfast A person should always try to eat breakfast as soon as possible after waking up, as blood sugar levels may have dropped during the night. It is advisable to limit intake of fruit juices in the morning and stick to juices that do not have added sugar, as these may cause blood sugar levels to become unstable. Some ideal breakfast choices include: Cinnamon is thought to help reduce blood sugar levels and can be sprinkled on many breakfast foods. Lunch Lunch should be a small meal but packed with protein, healthful fats, and complex carbohydrates that will continue to release energy slowly. Some good lunch ideas for hypoglycemia are: tuna, chicken, or tofu sandwich on whole-grain bread with salad leaves chickpea and vegetable salad grilled fish, a baked sweet potato, and a side salad It is necessary for a person with hypoglycemia to be aware of the glycemic index or GI of the foods they eat. Some foods that appear to be healthful may have a high GI. Fortunately, there is often an alternat Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

The Low Carb Plan

The Low Carb Plan

Eating to control your weight and your blood sugar The Mediterranean-style low carb approach which we recommend in The Blood Sugar Diet, is low in starchy, easily digestible carbs, but packed full of disease-fighting vitamins and flavonoids. It is rich in olive oil, fish, nuts, fruit and vegetables, but also contains lots of lovely things that down the years we have been told not to eat, such as full fat yoghurt and eggs. Although it is derived from the eating habits of people living in Mediterranean countries, you can apply the principles of Med-style eating to a wide range of different cuisines, from Chinese or Indian through to Mexican or Scandanavian. There is extensive evidence for the benefit of the Mediterranean style low carbohydrate diet, including cutting your risk of heart disease and diabetes. It has even been found to reduce risk the risk of breast cancer, compared with those on a low-fat diet. Consuming extra virgin olive oil (the fresh squeezed juice of olives) seems to be particularly beneficial when it comes to cancer, perhaps because it contains compounds such as polyphenols which are known to be anti-inflammatory. “This is potentially a life changing book for people with raised blood sugar levels as well as those with type 2 diabetes” Dr Tim Spector, Professor of Genetics, Kings College, London Kick the Carbs: Low Carb Mediterranean Style Eating – The ‘M Plan’ Cut right down on sugar, sugary treats, drinks and desserts: No more than once or twice a week and preferably less. You can use sugar substitutes like stevia and xylitol, but try to wean yourself off your sweet tooth. Avoid sweet fruits: Berries, apples & pears are fine, but sweet tropical fruits such as mango, pineapple, melon and bananas are full of sugar. Minimise or avoid the starc Continue reading >>

Will Low-carb Diets Cause Blood Sugar Levels To Drop?

Will Low-carb Diets Cause Blood Sugar Levels To Drop?

Video of the Day If you're accustomed to eating a very high-carb diet and suddenly switch to a very low-carb diet, you could experience rather dramatic drops in your blood sugar during the first few days or weeks of your transition. This low blood sugar can cause notably uncomfortable side effects and intense cravings. Carbs and Blood Sugar Your body converts consumed carbohydrates into glucose, a type of sugar. When the glucose enters your bloodstream, it leads to an increase in your blood sugar level. The pancreas produces insulin in response to spikes in blood sugar, which helps your body store the sugar for energy. This insulin release subsides when your cells absorb the sugar and your levels stabilize. In a healthy body, the surge of blood sugar and insulin is relatively moderate and keeps you evenly motoring through your day. When you eat lots of carbohydrates, your body's blood sugar remains consistently high and your system constantly pumps out insulin. This chronic elevation of blood sugar and release of insulin causes inflammation, an increase in fat storage and an inability to burn stored fat. Chronically high blood sugar levels increase your risk of disease, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. You crave carbohydrates regularly for energy, because your body isn't efficient at using stored fat for fuel. How a Low-Carb Diet Impacts Blood Sugar If you regularly consume a large amount of carbohydrates, especially refined ones like white bread and soda, you may experience a notable drop in blood sugar when you drastically reduce your carb intake. In the first week of carb reduction, your body will seek to maintain your high sugar intake. You'll crave carbohydrates and may even feel weak because your body hasn't yet become efficient at burning fat for fuel Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Medicines. Metabolic problems. Alcohol use. Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you've had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up. To diagnose hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your health and any medicines you take. You will need blood tests to check your blood sugar levels. Some tests might include not eating (fasting) and watching for symptoms. Other tests might involve eating a meal that could cause symptoms of low blood sugar seve Continue reading >>

How To Cut Carbs When You Suffer From Hypoglycemia

How To Cut Carbs When You Suffer From Hypoglycemia

How to Cut Carbs When You Suffer From Hypoglycemia How to Cut Carbs When You Suffer From Hypoglycemia So youre trying to lean out , and youre cutting down on carbs . But every time you swap out the rice for more greens and you hit the gym, you end up shaky, nauseous, cold, and clammy, and youre stuck with a killer migraine for the rest of the day. Sound familiar? You could be dealing with low blood sugar, also known as reactive hypoglycemia. As a nutritionist, I have many clients who struggle with this issuebut theyre often unsure how to manage it. When your blood sugar levels take a nosedive, dieting becomes difficult, if not impossible. Every time you try to eat less or exercise more, you crash hard and crave fast carbs to get your blood sugar up. If youre struggling with reactive hypoglycemia but still want to lose weight , heres how to make it work. Reactive hypoglycemia occurs when blood sugar levels drop too low about 3-4 hours after eating carbohydrates. This can be a result of your body consistently releasing too much insulin for the amount of carbohydrates you eat. When thats the case, every time your body signals for insulin release, it removes more carbohydrates from your bloodstream than you need. When blood sugar drops too low, symptoms like dizziness, nausea, and headaches can occur. These symptoms are alleviated by eating carbohydrates. The only problem: If youre cutting, eating more carbohydrates probably isnt part of your fat-loss strategy. Exercise is great for weight loss, but can be dangerous if you have hypoglycemia. In addition to overactive insulin release, hypoglycemia can also be caused by underactive glycogen release. Glycogen is your bodys storage form of carbohydrates, so your body releases it to keep your blood sugar at a safe level when yo Continue reading >>

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means that you have low blood sugar. People with diabetes often experience low blood sugar levels. Certain medications, excessive alcohol consumption, some critical illnesses and hormone deficiencies can also cause hypoglycemia without diabetes. Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition that causes low blood sugar within a four-hour window after meals. Eating food raises your blood sugar levels, but people who have hypoglycemia make more insulin than is needed when they eat. This excess insulin leads to the drop in their blood sugar level. Hypoglycemia is a lifelong condition, but you can help manage its symptoms through your diet. Follow these rules of thumb: Eat small meals every 3 to 4 hours throughout the day, rather than 3 large meals per day. Avoid foods high in saturated fats or trans fats. Choose foods with a low glycemic index score. Reduce or eliminate processed and refined sugars from your diet. Choose complex carbohydrates over simple carbohydrates. Reduce or eliminate alcoholic drinks, and never mix alcohol with sugar-filled mixers, such as fruit juice. Eat lean protein. Eat foods high in soluble fiber. Here are some ideas for a diet plan for people with hypoglycemia. You should eat a small meal as soon as possible after waking. A good breakfast should consist of protein, such as scrambled eggs, plus a complex carbohydrate. Try these: hard boiled eggs and a slice of whole-grain bread with cinnamon (several small studies indicate that cinnamon may help reduce blood sugar) a small serving of steel-cut oatmeal, like this protein-packed oatmeal with blueberries, sunflower seeds, and agave plain Greek yogurt with berries, honey, and oatmeal In addition, be mindful of your consumption of juices. Stick to 100% juice varieties that do not have added sweeten Continue reading >>

Common Concerns About Low-carb Dieting And Hypoglycemia

Common Concerns About Low-carb Dieting And Hypoglycemia

I magine that you’re a few days into your low-carb diet and when you suddenly you begin to feel “off”. You’re experiencing “brain fog”, light-headedness, weakness, and mood swings. Thoughts race through your mind. I don’t feel right…could I be hypoglycemic? Oh no, my blood sugar is low. Maybe, I should drink some fruit juice… STOP! Hold it right there! There is a better solution, but first, let’s try and figure out what may be the cause. Why am I feeling this way? When I hear someone say that they are hypoglycemic, I often raise an eyebrow. It is possible for some to experience episodes of acute hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, but that term gets tossed around more than a hot potato. In fact, the medical field uses a variety of values in glycemic control as cut-off points in order to define hypo- or hyperglycemia. The cut-off values aren’t clear-cut[1]. If you have a true underlying medical cause, such as diabetes, or some other condition, then this article isn’t intended for you. This is for the rest of the population, most of whom may not even know what a common fasting blood glucose range is. When one begins The Carb Nite® Solution, Carb Backloading™, or any other low-carb diet, there are some foreign physiological changes that can occur, and it is normal to be concerned or aware of these shifts. The “feeling” that you’re experiencing may indeed be a drop in blood sugar. Even if it’s within the normal range, you may experience the symptoms of hypoglycemia. However, there could be other reasons that you aren’t feeling optimal. Improving metabolic flexibility to use fats for fuel, namely the rate at which fat oxidation adjusts to high fat intake, can vary[2-4]. You could also be experiencing a shift in electrolytes[5]. That being s Continue reading >>

Suggested Meal Plan For A Hypoglycemia Diet

Suggested Meal Plan For A Hypoglycemia Diet

Hypoglycemia is a condition that occurs when the level of sugar in the blood drops to below 70 milligrams per deciliter. The condition causes weakness, sweating, dizziness, confusion and shakiness, but these symptoms can be avoided by following a diet that keeps blood sugar levels stable throughout the day and by planning healthy meals in advance. Many traditional breakfast foods, like processed cereals, pancakes, bagels, fruit juices and jams, are low in protein and high in carbohydrates. Both of these characteristics can create a sharp rise in the level of sugars in the blood, triggering the symptoms of hypoglycemia within just a few hours after eating. To keep blood sugar levels stable, stick to breakfast meals that include eggs, nuts, cheese, smoked salmon, whole fruits, nut butters, plain yogurt, olive oil and vegetables. For example, indulge in a bowl of plain yogurt topped with fresh berries instead of sugary cereal. Skip toast and jam and instead have steel-cut oats with with sliced strawberries or an omelet with mushrooms and Swiss cheese. Lunch Ideas Carb-rich lunches like sandwiches, burgers and french fries can trigger hypoglycemia. To keep your blood sugar levels on track, opt for lunches that include a healthy balance of protein, fats and a small amount of carbs that are rich in fiber. A large salad is the perfect base for your lunch. Top it with avocado slices, an olive-oil based vinaigrette, almonds and chicken, or make an Asian version with ginger-based dressing and pork. Try a Greek variation with chicken, feta cheese, olives and red onions. Omelets, frittatas, bean-rich soups, or lean fish with shredded-zucchini "pancakes" are other easy, tasty suggestions. Dinner Ideas Skip pasta or pizza and instead choose meals that include protein, healthy fats, n Continue reading >>

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