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Long Term Complications Of Dka

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=================================================== PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHvQ... =================================================== =================================================== Google Plus Profile : Google Plus Profile : https://plus.google.com/u/0/111392267... =================================================== How to Check Feet for Complications of Diabetes Part 1 : Looking for Changes in Foot Sensations 1.Be aware of numbness in your feet. One of the initial and most common symptoms of peripheral neuropathy that diabetics notice is that their feet lose sensation and become numb. 2.Be alert to tingling and burning sensations. Another common symptom is uncomfortable sensations, such as tingling, pins and needles and/or burning pain. 3.Take note of increased sensitivity to touch, called hyperesthesia. Another alteration of foot sensations that develops in a minority of diabetics is an increase in sensitivity to touch. 4.Pay attention to cramps or sharp pains. As the peripheral neuropathy progresses, it starts to affect the muscles of the feet. 5.Be mindful of muscle weakness. As high glucose goes into nerves, water follows glucose by osmosis and also goes into nerves. 6.Check for toe deformities. If the muscles of your feet are weak and your gait is altered, it will likely cause you to walk abnormally and put additional pressure on your toes. 7.Be very cautious with any signs of injury or infection. Aside from falling and breaking a bone while walking, the most serious complication a diabetic faces is an injury to their feet. 8.Look for similar symptoms in your hands. Although peripheral neuropathy typically begins in the lower limbs, specifically the feet, it also eventually effects the smaller peripheral nerves that innervate the fingers, hands and arms. 9.Check yourself for signs of autonomic neuropathy. The autonomic system includes the nerves that automatically control your heart rate, bladder, lungs, stomach, intestines, genitals and eyes. 10.Be alert to changes in your vision. Both peripheral and autonomic neuropathies affect the eyes, as does the destruction of small blood vessels due to glucose toxicity. How to Check Feet for Complications of Diabetes. What happens to your feet when you have diabetes? Why does diabetes lead to amputation? What are diabetic feet? Are sore feet a sign of diabetes? #diabetic feet pictures #early signs of diabetic feet #skin complications of diabetes #diabetic foot treatment #diabetic toe nails #diabetic feet swelling #type 2 diabetes feet #what happens to your feet when you have diabetes +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Our Blog Url : http://tubermentvideos.blogspot.com/ +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes control is vital to prevent several acute and chronic complications. Acute complications include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar coma, infections, hypoglycaemic episodes etc. Some of the chronic or long term complications include eye, kidney and nerve damage. Several other problems and lifestyle habits are responsible for worsening diabetes. These include smoking, elevated cholesterol levels, obesity, high blood pressure, and lack of regular exercise. Some of the common long term complications of diabetes and their pathophysiology include:– Weight loss – this is seen due to los of glucose and calories in urine. Poor wound healing, gum and other infections – this occurs due to increased blood glucose providing a good source of nutrition to microbes and due to a diminished immunity. Heart disease - this occurs due to changes in the large blood vessels leading to coronary, cerebral, and peripheral artery diseases, atherosclerosis, dyslipidemia etc. Damage to the large blood vessels is called macrovascular damage. Diabetic retinopathy or eye damage – this occurs due to damage of the fine blood vessels of the retina in the eye due to long term exposure to high blood Continue reading >>

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  1. Christopher

    In another thread someone made the statement that kids who have DKA at dx are at "great risk for complications down the road". It was also said that those who have "profound" DKA at dx have more difficulty with blood glucose control.
    I have not heard this before and would like to see any studies that discuss these issues, or hear anecdotal evidence from those parents who may (or may not) have experienced this.

  2. Dvbo79

    I would like to read a study on this as well. My son was in severe DKA when diagnosed. We are almost but not quite a year in. He doesn't appear to have a harder time than any other type 1 toddler. Very curious about this...

  3. obtainedmist

    This totally goes against what happened to us! DD came back from a 5 month exchange in Italy having lost 32 lbs and in big-time DKA! However, she has had a relatively easy time maintaining her bgs and good A1C's. I really do think that there are so many variations of this disease (YDMV) that this kind of generalization misses the mark!

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Complications Of Diabetes Mellitus

The complications of diabetes mellitus are far less common and less severe in people who have well-controlled blood sugar levels. Acute complications include hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, diabetic coma and nonketotic hyperosmolar coma. Chronic complications occur due to a mix of microangiopathy, macrovascular disease and immune dysfunction in the form of autoimmune disease or poor immune response, most of which are difficult to manage. Microangiopathy can affect all vital organs, kidneys, heart and brain, as well as eyes, nerves, lungs and locally gums and feet. Macrovascular problems can lead to cardiovascular disease including erectile dysfunction. Female infertility may be due to endocrine dysfunction with impaired signalling on a molecular level. Other health problems compound the chronic complications of diabetes such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol levels, and lack of regular exercise which are accessible to management as they are modifiable. Non-modifiable risk factors of diabetic complications are type of diabetes, age of onset, and genetic factors, both protective and predisposing have been found. Overview[edit] Complications of diabetes me Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Christopher

    In another thread someone made the statement that kids who have DKA at dx are at "great risk for complications down the road". It was also said that those who have "profound" DKA at dx have more difficulty with blood glucose control.
    I have not heard this before and would like to see any studies that discuss these issues, or hear anecdotal evidence from those parents who may (or may not) have experienced this.

  2. Dvbo79

    I would like to read a study on this as well. My son was in severe DKA when diagnosed. We are almost but not quite a year in. He doesn't appear to have a harder time than any other type 1 toddler. Very curious about this...

  3. obtainedmist

    This totally goes against what happened to us! DD came back from a 5 month exchange in Italy having lost 32 lbs and in big-time DKA! However, she has had a relatively easy time maintaining her bgs and good A1C's. I really do think that there are so many variations of this disease (YDMV) that this kind of generalization misses the mark!

  4. -> Continue reading
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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

The Risk And Outcome Of Cerebral Oedema Developing During Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract BACKGROUND Cerebral oedema is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with insulin dependent diabetes. AIMS To determine the risk and outcome of cerebral oedema complicating diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). METHODS All cases of cerebral oedema in England, Scotland, and Wales were reported through the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit between October 1995 and September 1998. All episodes of DKA were reported by 225 paediatricians identified as involved in the care of children with diabetes through a separate reporting system between March 1996 and February 1998. Further information about presentation, management, and outcome was requested about the cases of cerebral oedema. The risk of cerebral oedema was investigated in relation to age, sex, seasonality, and whether diabetes was newly or previously diagnosed. RESULTS A total of 34 cases of cerebral oedema and 2940 episodes of DKA were identified. The calculated risk of developing cerebral oedema was 6.8 per 1000 episodes of DKA. This was higher in new (11.9 per 1000 episodes) as opposed to established (3.8 per 1000) diabetes. There was no sex or age difference. Cerebral oedema was associated with a significant Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Christopher

    In another thread someone made the statement that kids who have DKA at dx are at "great risk for complications down the road". It was also said that those who have "profound" DKA at dx have more difficulty with blood glucose control.
    I have not heard this before and would like to see any studies that discuss these issues, or hear anecdotal evidence from those parents who may (or may not) have experienced this.

  2. Dvbo79

    I would like to read a study on this as well. My son was in severe DKA when diagnosed. We are almost but not quite a year in. He doesn't appear to have a harder time than any other type 1 toddler. Very curious about this...

  3. obtainedmist

    This totally goes against what happened to us! DD came back from a 5 month exchange in Italy having lost 32 lbs and in big-time DKA! However, she has had a relatively easy time maintaining her bgs and good A1C's. I really do think that there are so many variations of this disease (YDMV) that this kind of generalization misses the mark!

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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