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Lchf Insulin Resistance

What Is The Perfect Diet For Weight Loss And Diabetics? What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is The Perfect Diet For Weight Loss And Diabetics? What Is Insulin Resistance?

Have you heard but don’t understand what is insulin resistance? Are you gaining weight no matter what you try? Are you pre diabetic or been diagnosed as a diabetic (T1 or T2)? Has your appetite always been out of control? Well watch this fabulous Tedx talk by Dr Sarah Hallberg and see how insulin resistance can be playing a part in all the above conditions. Everyone can benefit from cutting carbs. Not only will it reduce your risk of T2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular risk factors and more importantly, your inflammatory markers are reduced which has huge implications for cancer prevention. Why are the guidelines still recommending for diabetics to consumes carbohydrates when they are intolerant to them? The message for so long has been “eat whatever you want, then medicate for it”. This is such nonsense. None of us should be eating so many carbs, let alone diabetics. We can have the beginnings of insulin resistance for years, even decades, before we are classed as pre diabetic or T2 diabetic. Having such high circulating levels of insulin is the problem. High insulin levels leads to insulin resistance. Our cells start to require more and more insulin to function. Click To Tweet So now you have watched the talk, lets look again at what insulin resistance is. We are all advised to eat far too many carbs, whether it is ‘healthy wholegrain’, sweets, ice cream, ‘natural’ muesli bars, cereals, bread or potatoes. This constant high level of circulating glucose (which all carbs are converted to) requires more and more insulin to push that glucose into your cells as glycogen. We can only store so much glycogen in our body so the remainder is stored as fat. Insulin is our fat storing hormone. Remember that again, insulin is our fat storing hormone. So whilst our b Continue reading >>

Why Insulin Resistance Is Good

Why Insulin Resistance Is Good

We’re always told that insulin resistance is the root cause of diabetes type 2. But that may be wrong. Insulin resistance could be a GOOD thing. Dr. Fung explains it well in this insightful new post. Basically, insulin resistance is the way the cells protect themselves from excess insulin and glucose in the blood (the real problem): Dr. Fung: Insulin Resistance is Good? I love Dr. Fung’s take on inflammation in this post as well. It has bothered me for quite some time when people claim that inflammation is the cause of X (i.e. heart disease). Inflammation is usually a symptom of a problem, it’s the body’s default response to damage. The cause is something else. In the case of heart disease the cause is damage to the interior of the blood vessels. This damage results in inflammation – but that’s just a symptom. The cause of the damage? Many things. High blood sugar. High blood pressure. Toxic chemicals (e.g. from smoking). And probably oxidized small dense LDL particles. Excess bad carbs can be behind all these causes of heart disease, except perhaps smoking. The thing is that we can’t solve the problem by attacking a symptom of the problem. Diabetes type 2 can’t be cured by targeting insulin resistance. Heart disease can’t be cured by targeting inflammation. We need to take away the cause, which in many cases is eating too many bad carbs, too often (a normal Western diet). More How to Cure Diabetes How to Lose Weight Continue reading >>

The Deal With Insulin Resistance

The Deal With Insulin Resistance

With Paleo, Ketogenic and LCHF (that’s low carb – high fat ICYMI) diets gaining widespread popularity right now, theres one term that is seeping into our daily chat a lot; Insulin Resistance. Insulin Resistance n. A state of diminished effectiveness of insulin in lowering the levels of bloodsugar, usually resulting from insulin binding by antibodies, and associated with such conditions as obesity, ketoacidosis, and infection. Insulin Resistance is a condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. If this is not acknowledged, or left untreated, insulin resistance can lead to a whole host of serious conditions such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, heart disease, inflammatory diseases and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). There is a world of research, reading, and DNA/epigenetic understanding behind the nutritional methods of keto/paleo/LCHF protocols, but in short, many of these diets are seeming to provide the grounds for which insulin sensitivity can be increased and insulin resistance, may be reversed. *Always consult with a registered professional before commencing any new nutritional protocols as it is not a one size fits all scenario and every body has differing needs to fulfil optimal health and function. So let us break down the deal with Insulin and some simple ways you can increase your insulin sensitivity. The hormone – Insulin Insulin is an essential hormone that controls your blood sugar levels. Made in the pancreas, this hormone helps to move the sugar (glucose) from your blood and transfers it to the cells where it can either be stored as energy in the muscles (glycogen) or as fat. In a healthy, optimally functioning body, the preferred storage method is to replenish glycogen stores first, so we have more fuel and energy expend Continue reading >>

A Practical Guide To Carb Tolerance And Insulin Sensitivity

A Practical Guide To Carb Tolerance And Insulin Sensitivity

One of the biggest reasons why people go Paleo is the metabolic benefits. Most people find Paleo to be very therapeutic for a whole cluster of carb-related problems: high blood sugar (or the rollercoaster of highs and lows), insulin resistance, and all the related issues. These issues can make weight loss difficult or impossible, but on the flip side, addressing them through diet can make it easier and more pleasant than you ever thought could happen! On the other hand, though, there are a lot of myths and half-truths floating around about diet, exercise, and carb metabolism. So here’s a quick review of what it all means, and the evidence supporting various different complementary strategies for improving your carb tolerance (preview: it’s so much more than dietary carbs). Note: This article is not written for diabetics. Diabetes is a very complicated disease and strategies that are right for other people might not be appropriate. If you have diabetes, see a doctor! What Is “Carb Tolerance”/Insulin Sensitivity? (If you already know how insulin and glucose work, this section has nothing new for you; just skip down to the next one) Very simply put, insulin sensitivity (or “carb tolerance” in everyday language) is a healthy hormonal state that allows your body to digest and store carbohydrates without a problem. In healthy people, here’s how it works: You eat something with carbs (let’s say a potato, but it could be anything). Your digestive system breaks down the starch in that potato into glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar – this is the form of carbohydrate that you’ll either use for energy or store as fat. Your blood sugar temporarily rises as the glucose enters the bloodstream. This is not a big problem, because… Insulin (produced in the pancreas) Continue reading >>

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

What You Need to Know about Sugar and Insulin Resistance In today’s post our fructose journey comes to a sweet conclusion, with answers to the questions that really matter: How much sugar is safe for you to eat? How much fructose and glucose is in your favorite foods, drinks, and sweeteners? How can you tell if you have insulin resistance (damaged carbohydrate metabolism)? What are some of the common clues? What tests can you ask your doctor to run? What can you do to take control of your health? I’ve included an infographic of 10 simple strategies that go beyond cutting added sugars, to improve your metabolism and prevent/treat common diseases. Earlier in this series we discovered that fructose is not scarier than glucose. In fact, consuming too much glucose is even riskier than consuming too much fructose because glucose is a more powerful trigger for “insulin resistance.” It is excess glucose that raises blood sugar and insulin levels, turns off fat burning, shifts fat and cholesterol production into overdrive, feeds cancer cells, and sets the stage for inflammation throughout the body.1) People with insulin resistance are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future, so insulin resistance is often referred to as “pre-diabetes.” So, should you focus on reducing the amount of glucose-y food you eat and lean towards fructose-y foods instead? Good luck with that…people talk about fructose as though it’s a separate sugar from glucose, but practically speaking, it’s not. In real foods, fructose never exists alone—wherever fructose is, glucose is right there beside it, so it’s not easy to separate them in your diet. Even the vast majority of manufactured foods and beverages contain a mixture of fructose and glucose, as you’ll see in the Continue reading >>

Lchf Induced Insulin Resistance

Lchf Induced Insulin Resistance

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community So, just a heads up for those on LCHF and thinking of having a cheat day... Been very low carb since Jan 7th this year for weight and BG control and it's been great thus far. Thought I'd have a measured lunch of rice and king prawns just for old times sake yesterday and I've only just recovered from the BG rollecoaster. Moral of the story? If your low carbing and plan on having an excursion from your normal routine be prepared for some unpredictable results, you may need a lot more insulin then normal (for your first few carb laden meals??). I'm back to LCHF now Yes I have read elsewhere that you need to wean yourself off LCHF gently if you are looking to add more carbs to your diet, even if let's say you have done something like the Newcastle diet and achieved very good results (T2 only - I think you are T1?). You need to avoid shocking the system. Yes, T1,definitely a shock to the system, my 7day average BG of 5.6 is no more! I think my body has forgotten how to process insulin&carbs... ;-) This could be why NHS people counsel against completely cutting the carbs. This could be why NHS people counsel against completely cutting the carbs. It's impossible to completely cut out carbs. But if you are T2 diabetic and want to control your BG adequately you have to radically reduce your carbs in my opinion. I don't think eating even moderate amounts of so-called 'good' unprocessed low GI carbs is enough until the underlying factors in one's diabetes (body fat, fitness, insulin resistance, etc.) have been improved. My aim is to get back to a near normal level of insulin sensitivity and BG control so that I can eat carbs without risk of BG spikes - before I Continue reading >>

Am I Insulin Resistant?

Am I Insulin Resistant?

Who cares? You’d care because being insulin resistance combined with a moderate to high carbohydrate diet makes you “hyperinsulinemic” – you have high insulin all the time. This means you are now metabolically dysregulated meaning your body: turns fat burning off promotes fat storage dials down your physical activity (feel lethargic and lazy) disrupts the hunger control mechanisms in the brain has all the physiological factors in play (reactive oxygen species, inflammation, IGF-1 etc) which eventually result in the range of metabolic diseases which will kill most of us with a reduced quality of life for a decade before we die – diabetes, cancer, heart disease and dementia. Understanding how your own body reacts to different types of food, stress, and other environmental factors is absolutely key to long term health, especially weight control. That’s why we care about insulin resistance and maybe you should too…..read on What is insulin? Insulin is a protein produced by the pancreas. It helps in the regulation of nutrients and energy around the body. It is best known for helping move glucose (carbs) into cells so it can be used for energy. That’s a pretty crucial function; without insulin you will die. Type 1 diabetes is a failure of the pancreas to produce insulin, so Type 1 diabetics can inject synthetic insulin. But insulin is way more interesting than just that. It is part of a complex hormonal and neural system that affects all parts of our body. That system controls energy storage and energy use. That system controls: Fat burning – elevated insulin turns off fat burning Fat storage – elevated insulin promotes nutrients (both carbs and fat) to be stored away in fat cells Physical activity – elevated insulin dials down (your brain suppresses you Continue reading >>

Part 1: What Is Insulin Resistance?

Part 1: What Is Insulin Resistance?

The hormone insulin plays a number of roles, one of which is to help move the glucose that is produced from the digestion of food – from the blood and into the cells for energy. Insulin resistance is where the body isn’t responding to insulin’s signals to take up glucose, so blood glucose remains high, despite normal or high levels of insulin. Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is essentially a state of very high insulin resistance. Insulin normally goes up when we eat foods that contain carbohydrate (breads, pasta, rice, fruit, milk products, etc.) and acts on the liver to help store the incoming food energy – first as glycogen and when liver and muscle glycogen stores are “full”, it acts to store the excess energy as fat (de novo lipogenesis). When we haven’t eaten for a while or are sleeping, the hormone glucagon acts to break down the glycogen in our muscles and liver (glycogenolysis) in order to supply our brain and cells with glucose. Insulin acts to inhibit glucagon‘s action, which signals the body to stop making new glucose from its glycogen stores. When our glycogen stores run out (such as when we are fasting), the body turns to non-carbohydrate sources such as fat to make the glucose it needs for essential functions (gluconeogenesis). When we are insulin resistant, insulin continues to act on the liver to signal it to store energy. When glycogen stores are “full”, it stores the excess energy as fat. When fat stores are “full”, the body starts storing the excess fat that the liver keeps making, inside the liver itself. There shouldn’t be fat in the liver, but when we are insulin resistant, such as in Type 2 Diabetes excess fat gets stored in the liver in a condition known as “fatty liver disease“. In insulin resistance, the liver becomes more s Continue reading >>

Significance Of Insulin Resistance

Significance Of Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is a condition whereyour body keeps producing more and more insulin in order to transport glucose out of the blood and store the excess by converting it to fat. When cells have become resistant to insulin,glucosebuilds up in the blood and results in high blood sugar. The problem is thathigh blood sugar is a symptom of the problem,it is not the problem itself. Insulin resistance is the underlying cause and is highly significant to those with completely normal blood sugar levels. Those with high fasting blood glucose may notice symptoms that are associated with Type 2 Diabetes; including excess urination and excess thirst. This is the bodys way of trying to dilute the high levels of glucose in the blood.A verysobering fact is that 75% of people with insulin resistance have normal fasting blood glucose levelsand dont know that they are insulin resistant. They dont know that they are at increased risk for heart attack and stroke. Insulin resistanceis a risk factor for atherosclerosis* also called hardening of the arteries. Atherosclerosis is where plaque builds up inside the bodys arteries and if the plaque build-up occurs in the heart, brain or kidney, it can result in in coronary heart disease, angina (chest pain) orchronic kidney disease. These diseases are normally associated with Diabetes, but it is the underlying insulin resistance of Diabetes that creates the increased risk not thehigh blood sugar itself. Worthy of note, it is beinginsulin resistancethat increases ones risk whether or not one also has high blood blood sugar. Theplaquethat builds up in atherosclerosis may partially block or totally blockblood flow to the heart or brain and if apiece of the plaquebreaks off or if ablood clot (thrombus) appears on the plaques surface thiscan block th Continue reading >>

Lchf May Damage More On Insulin Sensitive

Lchf May Damage More On Insulin Sensitive

LCHF may damage more on insulin sensitive To the OP: Yeah you are really thin and type 2, that's hard. I don't know much about that condition at all. They call that TOFI right? Thin on the outside and fat on the inside? It's a gene that doesn't allow you to generate much subcontaneous fat right? I have no idea what kind of diet would be best for that at all. I think jwags is in similar situation no? SHe didn't have luck with LCHF diet, and I recall she's thin. I do have a lot of subcontaneous fat myself and keto works very well for me. Btw, if you don't eat carbs for a while and then start eating them again, it takes a few days to rebuild the enzymes that digest carbs. So that's why blood sugar rises when people start eating carbs again after coming off LCHF. I'll get my HOMA-IR on Monday and have results on Tuesday and post here. To let you know if my insulin resistance has improved over the past 15 months on LCHF (i.e. for a subcontaneously fat person like myself). Friend Thin super-active but rising FBG; Mom T2 Just read this yesterday. It may offer some insight. I've been LCHF for 3 years and could never go back. When your weight is stable, how's the numbers such as OGTT, A1C and fasting insulin? Also, is your chole level acceptable? I am very confused the more I do reading on the internet. There are many topics about pros and cons on this and that. But we never know how big of the pro and con... Saying VLC will increase IR and fail in OGTT but we never know how much increasement it is and if such increase actually will make beta cells produce MORE or LESS insulin daily comparing to keep M-Carb diet.... All our purpose is to save beta cells and keep liver from producing too much sugar, no? Diabetes is so complicate puzzle and how come human still just label T1 and Continue reading >>

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29 million people in America have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Insulin resistance is recognized as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. But what causes insulin resistance? In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger talks about how fat affects insulin resistance, and about how the most effective way to reduce insulin sensitivity is to reduce fat intake. We’ve also provided a summary of Dr. Greger’s main points below. Insulin Resistance of People on High-Fat Diets vs. High-Carb Diets In studies performed as early as the 1930s, scientists have noted a connection between diet and insulin intolerance. In one study, healthy young men were split into two groups. Half of the participants were put on a fat-rich diet, and the other half were put on a carb-rich diet. The high-fat group ate olive oil, butter, mayonnaise, and cream. The high-carb group ate pastries, sugar, candy, bread, baked potatoes, syrup, rice, and oatmeal. Within two days, tests showed that the glucose intolerance had skyrocketed in the group eating the high-fat diet. This group had twice the blood sugar levels than the high-carb group. The test results showed that the higher the fat content of the diet, the higher the blood sugar levels would be. What Is Insulin Resistance? It turns out that as the amount of fat in the diet goes up, so does one’s blood sugar spikes. Athletes frequently carb-load before a race because they’re trying to build up fuel in their muscles. We break down starch into glucose in our digestive tract; it circulates as blood glucose (blood sugar); and it is then used by our muscle cells as fuel. Blood sugar, though, is like a vampire. It needs an invitation to enter our cells. And that invit Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: Does Eating A Low Carb Diet Cause Insulin Resistance?

Dear Mark: Does Eating A Low Carb Diet Cause Insulin Resistance?

157 Comments Despite all the success you might have had with the Primal way of life, doubts can still nag at you. Maybe it’s something you read, or something someone said to you, or a disapproving glance or offhand comment from a person you otherwise respect, but it’s pretty common when you’re doing something, like giving up grains, avoiding processed food, or eating animal fat, that challenges deeply-and-widely held beliefs about health and wellness. It doesn’t really even matter that you’re losing weight or seem to be thriving; you may still have questions. That’s healthy and smart, and it’s totally natural. A question I’ve been getting of late is the effect of reducing carb intake on insulin sensitivity. It’s often bandied about that going low carb is good for folks with insulin resistance, but it’s also said that low carb can worsen insulin resistance. Are both true and, if so, how do they all jibe together? That’s what the reader was wondering with this week’s question: Hi Mark, I’ve been Primal for a few months now and love it. Lowering my carbs and upping my animal fat helped me lose weight and gain tons of energy (not too shabby for a middle-aged guy!). However, I’m a little worried. I’ve heard that low carb diets can increase insulin resistance. Even though I’ve done well and feel great, should I be worried about insulin resistance? Do I need to increase my carb intake? I always thought low carb Primal was supposed to improve insulin function. Vince Going Primal usually does improve insulin sensitivity, both directly and in a roundabout way. It improves directly because you lose weight, you reduce your intake of inflammatory foods, you lower systemic inflammation (by getting some sun, smart exercise, omega-3s, and reducing or dea Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance And How Can The Banting Diet Help?

What Is Insulin Resistance And How Can The Banting Diet Help?

What is insulin resistance and how can the Banting diet help? Today on The Ask Prof Noakes Podcast we ask Prof. Tim Noakes to explain exactly what insulin resistance is. He gives us guidelines on how we would know if we are insulin resistant and if we aren’t insulin resistant, he gives us advise on whether we should be following the Banting Diet. Today we look at a term we speak about very often on this podcast. When discussing the Banting Diet and who should be following an LCHF Diet we mention the term insulin resistance. Bruce submitted his question via our website and even though it is a fairly simple question, it is one that we quite often don’t think about answering because we almost assume that people should know the answer. Bruce wanted to know, in layman’s terms, what exactly is insulin resistance? How do we know if we are insulin resistant? And if we aren’t insulin resistant, should we still be following the Banting Diet? Prof Tim Noakes: That is a wonderful question and it is something that I didn’t know about four years ago. We weren’t taught about insulin resistance. Just to make the point that Tim Noakes didn’t discover insulin resistance. It was really discovered by a chap called Jerry Raven from Stanford University, who in the 1960’s read that there are two types of diabetes. There is one where you are insulin resistant and there’s one where you have no insulin – so you are insulin deficient. Insulin deficient gives you type 1 diabetes because you don’t secrete enough insulin or you don’t secrete any insulin so you have to inject insulin or else you die. When was insulin resistance discovered? The type 2 is the insulin resistance where although you are secreting some insulin it doesn’t work properly in the body. Then you get evi Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Is Good? – T2d 7

Insulin Resistance Is Good? – T2d 7

Everybody says that insulin resistance is bad. Very bad. It’s the root cause of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and metabolic syndrome, isn’t it? So, if it is so bad, why do we all develop it in the first place? What’s the root cause? My friend Dr. Gary Fettke from Tasmania wrote an illuminating book called ‘Inversion’ where he describes how you can learn a lot from looking at things from another perspective. Invert (turn upside down) your perspective, and see how your horizons are immensely broadened. So let’s look at why we develop insulin resistance. Why is it good? Root Cause Analysis What is the root cause of insulin resistance? Some people say inflammation or oxidative stress or free radicals causes insulin resistance. Those are total cop-out answers. Inflammation is the body’s non-specific response to injury. But what causes the injury in the first place? That’s the real problem. The inflammation is only the body’s response to whatever is causing the injury. Think about it this way. Suppose we are battlefield surgeons. After decades on the job, we decide that blood is bad. After all, every time we see blood, bad things are happening. When we don’t see blood, bad things are not happening. It must be the blood that is dangerous. So, deciding that blood is what is killing people, we invent a machine to suction all the blood of people. Genius! The problem, of course, is what’s causing the bleeding, rather than the blood itself. Look for the root cause. Bleeding’s only the response, not the cause. Bleeding is a marker for disease. So is inflammation. Something causes bleeding, the body’s non specific response. Something causes inflammation, the body’s non specific response. Gunshots cause bleeding, knife wounds cause bleeding, and shrapnel causes bl Continue reading >>

Are You Insulin Resistant?

Are You Insulin Resistant?

Finding out you are insulin resistant doesn't mean much unless you understand what that implies, and how it effects your health. Insulin resistance is an condition in which the body is not responding properly to the hormone insulin. If faulty insulin signaling is not treated, it can develop into worsening conditions of metabolic syndrome, pre diabetes, and finally type 2 diabetes. What Causes the Insulin Resistant Condition? The insulin resistant condition is rooted in the metabolic effects of a high carb diet in combination with a lack of exercise. Weight gain is a symptom of insulin resistance, rather than a cause. Carbohydrates are foods which contain either some form of sugar or starch, or both. For instance, orange juice is full of fructose, a type of sugar, and white potatoes contain large amounts of starch. Both types of carbohydrate are broken down in the body into glucose, a simple sugar, which your cells can use for energy to do all the things that cells do. Since too much glucose in your body can be toxic, your pancreas releases a powerful hormone called insulin. Insulin works to control the amount of glucose in your bloodstream. It acts to quickly move glucose from your bloodstream and push it into your cells where it can be burned or stored. But there's a catch. To get the glucose into the cells, the cell's glucose "storage tanks" have to be empty. This is logical when you think about it. Imagine what would happen if you tried to fill up your car's gas tank if it were already full. And just like running a car burns up gasoline, when a person exercises, the glucose which is already in the glucose tanks get used. Now there is room for insulin to push the glucose made from the last meal into the muscle cell for fuel. If a person exercises frequently, lots of c Continue reading >>

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