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Lchf High Blood Sugar

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Twitter summary: What I learned from doubling my carb intake: the same average blood sugar, but four times as much hypoglycemia, more work, stress, & danger. As a teenager, I ate a high carb diet that included lots of Goldfish crackers, white sandwich bread, pasta, and white potatoes. It was tasty, but it put my blood sugars on a wild roller coaster every single day. Things turned around in college when I learned about nutrition, got on CGM, and spent time with health conscious friends. I soon realized that eating less than 30 grams of carbs at one time was a complete gamechanger. I’ve stuck with that approach ever since. But is this lower carb method actually better for my blood sugars, or have I just been fooling myself? To find out, I took on a somewhat terrifying self-tracking experiment: 12 days of my usual, lower-carb diet, which averaged 146 grams of carbs per day (21% of daily calories). My carbs were primarily from nuts, seeds, vegetables, and a bit of fruit. 12 days of a higher-carb, high whole-grain diet, which averaged 313 grams of carbs per day (43% of my daily calories). My sources of carbs were NOT junk food: plain oatmeal, whole wheat bread, quinoa, wild rice, and fruit. Neither of these was unrealistic. My lower-carb diet was nowhere near Atkins level (20 grams per day), and the higher-carb diet was consistent with the “average” 45% carb diet in people with diabetes (according to ADA). Even though this was a one-person (n=1) experiment, I wanted to be as scientific and fair as possible: eating whole, unprocessed foods in both periods; counting and tracking every single gram of carbohydrate (LoseIt! app); wearing CGM 24/7 and downloading the glucose data to document what happened (Dexcom G5 and Clarity); taking insulin before meals (5-15 minutes pr Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting High Blood-glucose Levels

Troubleshooting High Blood-glucose Levels

10,007 views Are you struggling with high blood glucose, even on a ketogenic diet? There are many factors which can have an impact on blood sugar, and Miriam Kalamian guides you through them all. She has written the book Keto for Cancer, and passionately helps people with a wide range of conditions to go on a ketogenic diet. Watch a part of the presentation above (transcript). The full video is available (with captions and transcript) with a free trial or membership: Trouble shooting high blood-glucose levels – Miriam Kalamian Join free for a month to get instant access to this and hundreds of other low-carb TV videos. Plus Q&A with experts and our awesome low-carb meal-plan service. Earlier Keto More Keto for beginners Continue reading >>

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Blood Sugar

Video: What Eating “high-fat” Or “keto” Does To Your Blood Sugar

What happens to your blood sugar when you eat fat? The steps you need to stabilize your blood sugar and increase your fat-burning hormones (by following a Fat Fueled, keto eating style). Up until I found keto (high-fat, low-carb living) I was in the “eat every 2-3 hours in order to control blood sugar” camp. What I didn’t know, was that the constant eating; generally of carbohydrates, was exactly what was causing my blood sugar irregularities – constant “hangry” feelings, hypoglycemia, insulin resistance, and more. After a couple of weeks of eating Fat Fueled, keto, I no longer struggled with hypoglycemia. It was as if my sugar lows just… disappeared. And I’m not the only one that’s experienced massive changes to blood sugar shortly after shifting to a Fat Fueled, keto life. I invited Dietitian Cassie on the show today to help explain exactly what happens to our blood sugar when we eat fat – the ins and outs of insulin resistance, actions that affect blood sugar, how to use carb-ups to heal insulin resistance and much more. Today’s keto video encourages us to use dietary fat as our ally, to rely on it to support balanced blood sugar, thriving hormones and a healthy body. For video transcription, scroll down. Highlights… What foods affect blood sugar How dietary fat affects your blood sugar If combining carbohydrates and fat is a good thing How fat cells are created How to get into fat-burning mode Signs and symptoms of insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity How cortisol (and a poor sleep) affects your blood sugar How carb cycling and carb refeeding can help bust through insulin resistance How to heal yourself from insulin resistance Resources… Watch the video: When to know it’s time to carb-up (and how to do it) Step-by-step guide on goin Continue reading >>

The Dawn Phenomenon – T2d 8

The Dawn Phenomenon – T2d 8

The occurrence of high blood sugars after a period of fasting is often puzzling to those not familiar with the Dawn Phenomenon. Why are blood sugars elevated if you haven’t eaten overnight? This effect is also seen during fasting, even during prolonged fasting. There are two main effects – the Somogyi Effect and the Dawn Phenomenon. Somogyi Effect The Somogyi effect is also called reactive hyperglycaemia and happens in type 2 diabetic patients. The blood sugar sometimes drops in reaction to the night time dose of medication. This low blood sugar is dangerous, and in response, the body tries to raise it. Since the patient is asleep, he/she does not feel the hypoglycaemic symptoms of shakiness or tremors or confusion. By the time the patient awakens, the sugar is elevated without a good explanation. The high blood sugar occurs in reaction to the preceding low. This can be diagnosed by checking the blood sugar at 2am or 3am. If it is very low, then this is diagnostic of the Somogy Effect. Dawn Phenomenon The Dawn Effect, sometimes also called the Dawn Phenomenon (DP) was first described about 30 years ago. It is estimated to occur in up to 75% of T2D patients although severity varies widely. It occurs both in those treated with insulin and those that are not. The circadian rhythm creates this DP. Just before awakening (around 4am), the body secretes higher levels of Growth Hormone, cortisol, glucagon and adrenalin. Together, these are called the counter-regulatory hormones. That is, they counter the blood sugar lowering effects of insulin, meaning that they raise blood sugars. The nocturnal surge of growth hormone is considered the primary cause of the DP. These normal circadian hormonal increases prepare our bodies for the day ahead. That is, glucagon tells the liver Continue reading >>

Blood Sugars High On Lchf Diet

Blood Sugars High On Lchf Diet

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have type 2 diabetes so decided to try LCHF diet. I have adjusted to it well after two weeks and lost 4 kilos. The only problem is my BS levels remain high. The range is 8 -12 throughout the day. I take 1500 metformin daily. Worry now about the high levels and any advise would be much appreciated. Thank you. carol43 Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member Hi Mairead, can you tell us what you usually eat perhaps you are having something that is spiking you. Are you testing before eating and 1 and 2 hours afterwards? I'm sure @daisy1 will be along shortly with her advice. Breakfast - omelette ( two eggs, onion, mushrooms, cheese) coffee Plain yogurt( 10% fat) cream, berries, nuts Lunch - Mixed salad with tuna or prawns ( olive oil, Mayo ) Dinner - Chicken or turkey or fish ( fried in butter ) Mixed veg roasted in olive oil and garlic, I make other recipes from the Diet doc as well. Above is what I would eat most days. I can't speak for you, but I really need to avoid carbs first thing in the morning, because that is my highest BS. I can tolerate yogurt & berries fine, but only later in the day. When you say 10% fat on the yogurt, that makes me think it is not full fat. Which means the carb count/sugar will be higher than full fat plain. To be honest I think 10% fat on yogurt is the highest, but I will stand corrected. I think you should give it a bit more time for your body to become adjusted. For that breakfast recipe I followed the "Diet Doctor".They used 10% fat plain yogurt ( no sugar) and 40% cream. I am another than spikes a lot if I have any fruit for breakfast, but can tolerate it later in the day. I also limit my berries to either 2 strawber Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels

Blood Sugar Levels

Home Our Story Your Stories Why Low Carb/High Fat? The Edify Food Pyramid Where Do I Start? What Can I Eat? Cooking Tips Eating Out Drinks Life Without Bread How Do I Shop? Carb Cravings What We Eat Meal Ideas Low Carb Recipes The Resource Room Articles Videos Books Websites The Science Initial Side Effects Blood Sugar Levels Frequently Asked Questions Our Blog LCHF Forum Snippets The Permi In Us Disclaimer Contact Us Have you ever wondered why you feel hungry a short while after having a feed full of carbs? You are full straight away, but an hour or two later you are looking for a snack to tide you over until the next meal. This is believed to occur because of the body's reaction to a big intake of carbohydrates. The carbs are quickly absorbed into the blood stream sending your Blood Glucose levels sky high. Then over the next few hours your levels drop. They drop so far that they go below the normal recommended levels, then slowly rise back up. This occurs over a 6 hour period (around the same time you are ready for your next meal). The problem is, while your blood sugar levels are dropping down after the carb rush, your hunger starts to kick in. This usually occurs between 1 and 4 hours after eating a high carb meal. Dr Andreas Eenfeldt (The Food Revolution video) performed his own tests on himself regarding blood glucose levels (see attached image). He recorded his blood sugar levels over a 6 hour period after eating two completely different kinds of meals. Meal 1 : Piece of non-lean steak and veggies (all fried in butter) with Bernaise sauce (egg yolk and butter sauce). Meal 2* : Tuna sandwich, apple, tub of yoghurt, a chocolate bar and a bottle of water. * This meal was provided to doctors at the International Conference on Obesity 2010 in Sweden.... Go figure! As Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Ketogenic Dieters! Plus A Special Surprise (hint: Genotypes And Metabolism)!

High Blood Sugar In Ketogenic Dieters! Plus A Special Surprise (hint: Genotypes And Metabolism)!

A while ago Michael and I were discussing future article topics. There are truly a plethora of avenues to go down in this area of research and there is no lack of things to research and comment on. But even though I have a couple of pretty cool MCT articles sitting around on my desk, I want an interesting topic. I want something new. Something challenging. Besides, everyone is drinking the MCT koolaid these days. It’s become passe. (Also, it upsets my stomach and I have a personal vendetta against it. So there.) What’s new? There has to be something new! Michael pointed me to one of his old articles on physiological insulin resistance as an idea. I brushed it off at first. Dismissed it as a quirk. But then I thought about it. WHY does blood glucose rise in response to a low carb diet? It truly is an interesting question. What does it say about low carb diets if they induce an almost diabetic effect on circulating glucose? Thus my research began. This short abstract confirmed that it is normal for people on low carb diets to experience a rise in blood glucose levels. Because it’s a non-open journal (shame!), there’s a one-sentence explanation given: A decrease in first-phase insulin secretion may partially contribute to the short-term LC/HFD-induced increase in postprandial plasma glucose levels. First phase insulin secretion? There’s a first phase? So… There’s more than one phase to insulin secretion? I had no idea. Call me ignorant but I had no idea until this point that there was more than one phase to insulin secretion. This article delves deeper into the signaling involved in (what I learned is called) biphasic insulin secretion. The first phase of insulin secretion lasts approximately 10 minutes, and the second phase of insulin secretion picks up afte Continue reading >>

Will Low-carb Diets Cause Blood Sugar Levels To Drop?

Will Low-carb Diets Cause Blood Sugar Levels To Drop?

Video of the Day If you're accustomed to eating a very high-carb diet and suddenly switch to a very low-carb diet, you could experience rather dramatic drops in your blood sugar during the first few days or weeks of your transition. This low blood sugar can cause notably uncomfortable side effects and intense cravings. Carbs and Blood Sugar Your body converts consumed carbohydrates into glucose, a type of sugar. When the glucose enters your bloodstream, it leads to an increase in your blood sugar level. The pancreas produces insulin in response to spikes in blood sugar, which helps your body store the sugar for energy. This insulin release subsides when your cells absorb the sugar and your levels stabilize. In a healthy body, the surge of blood sugar and insulin is relatively moderate and keeps you evenly motoring through your day. When you eat lots of carbohydrates, your body's blood sugar remains consistently high and your system constantly pumps out insulin. This chronic elevation of blood sugar and release of insulin causes inflammation, an increase in fat storage and an inability to burn stored fat. Chronically high blood sugar levels increase your risk of disease, including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. You crave carbohydrates regularly for energy, because your body isn't efficient at using stored fat for fuel. How a Low-Carb Diet Impacts Blood Sugar If you regularly consume a large amount of carbohydrates, especially refined ones like white bread and soda, you may experience a notable drop in blood sugar when you drastically reduce your carb intake. In the first week of carb reduction, your body will seek to maintain your high sugar intake. You'll crave carbohydrates and may even feel weak because your body hasn't yet become efficient at burning fat for fuel Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle tissues to store excess glucose as a molecule called glycogen and also reduces glucose production by the liver. When blood sugar is low, the hormone glucagon (produced by alpha-cells in the pancreas) stimulate cells to break down glycogen into glucose that is subsequently released into the blood stream. In healthy people who do not have type II diabetes, these functions allow levels of blood glucose and insulin to stay in a normal range. What Is Insulin Resistance and Why Is It a Problem? Unfortunately, for many Americans and other peopl Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars | Fat Loss At Fifty

High Blood Sugars | Fat Loss At Fifty

How the Low Carb, High Fat Lifestyle Rescued Me from My Genetic CurseDiabetes Earlier this month, Brian, my life partner shared his story with you. He was able to turn his health around. More importantly, he has added many years to his life. But Im the lucky one because I get to spend those years with him. One of the people who helped to keep Brian motivated was his good friend, Steve. I think it made things easier at work, having someone else who was living a low carb lifestyle. These men are an absolute inspiration and I am very proud of them! I asked Steve if he would share his testimony with my readers. Below is his story. How the Low Carb, High Fat Lifestyle Rescued Me from My Genetic CurseDiabetes If youve taken the time to read Brians testimonial prior to my own, Ive already been introduced. Brian and I are coworkers and friends. Craft beer drinking buddies, although weve reduced that pastime considerably since we both discovered the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) way of life. Even though we see each other every workday, we stumbled upon LCHF independently and, coincidentally, right around the same time. Having Brian and Wendy to bounce around ideas, experiences and discoveries has been a tremendous advantage for me and, I feel, to them, as well. So when Wendy asked if Id be interested in sharing my testimonial, I was more than excited to oblige. I feel Ive found a tremendous secret. I say secret because the info every person struggling with weight, high blood sugars and diabetes should know is kept hidden by Big Pharma, our government and others around the world. The food pyramid, which the mainstream authorities have recently replaced with the Plate, are guidelines that fail to incorporate important scientific research that bears out the truth about nutrition that c Continue reading >>

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs Can you have high blood sugar without carbs? Well, its important to look at common beliefs about high blood sugar first. High blood sugar is bad. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Therefore carbohydrates are bad. The theory is simple, and yet incredibly flawed. The truth is, you can have chronically high blood sugar even while religiously avoiding every starch and sugar in sight. Low-carb forums are littered with posts asking a very relevant question: Why is my blood sugar so high when Im not eating any carbs? The answer is simple, yet often overlooked. The Hormone that Raises Blood Sugar: No Carbohydrates Required If the body were an engine, glucose would be its fuel. Most people think glucose only comes from carbohydrates (sugar and starch), but protein can also be turned into glucose when there arent enough carbs around to do the job. This is called gluconeogenesis, and its performed by one of the major stress hormones cortisol. When you have high cortisol levels (from diet, lifestyle, etc.), the cortisol rapidly breaks down protein into glucose, which can raise blood sugar levels considerably. For some folks, this results in chronically high blood sugareven if they are on a low-carb diet. The trouble is, cortisol isnt just breaking down the protein you eat. Its doing something far more destructive. The body is quite a smart machine, and it has no problem taking detours to get energy if necessary. If your body isnt getting the energy it needs from your diet, it has a back-up source: its own tissue. It sounds kind of cannibalistic, eating your own lean body tissue for energy. I mean, I seriously doubt any one of you would relish cutting off a chunk of your leg for dinner. I know I wouldnt. But every time your body uses c Continue reading >>

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

Low Carb-high Fat Diet And Diabetes: A Detailed Guide For Beginners

If you are a regular reader of our site, you would already know that we highly endorse the Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) diet for reversing diabetes, losing weight and improving your overall health and well-being. The reason why a low carb diet for diabetes comes highly recommended by doctors and nutritionists alike is the fact that carbohydrates are the main culprit behind elevated blood sugar levels. Once you eat fewer carbs, it automatically becomes much easier for the body to attain stable blood sugar levels. Low Carb High Fat (LCHF) Diet for Diabetes: Why It Works? Carbohydrates are broken down into simple sugars during digestion. These sugars enter the blood stream and elevate blood sugar levels. As a diabetic, your body either doesn’t produce insulin at all, or doesn’t produce enough insulin to minimize this blood sugar spike before it causes irreplaceable damage to internal organs. This is the reason why your body’s dependence on insulin goes down when you eat lesser carbs. A UK study tried to understand the short-term effects of severe dietary carbohydrate-restriction advice in type 2 diabetes. It found that restricting carbohydrate intake is an effective method to lose weight as well as improve HDL ratios. This was a randomized controlled trial studying 102 patients over a course of 3 months, and the results were published in the Diabetic Medicine in September 2005. Another research group from Duke University Medical Center studying the effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients, found that 95.2% patients had managed to reduce or eliminate their glucose-lowering medication within 6 months of being on a LCHF diet. A low carb diet works very well in lowering blood sugar and insul Continue reading >>

Lchf Diet And Blood Sugar Levels

Lchf Diet And Blood Sugar Levels

Abby, I see salad and vegetables (both proteins) and then protein shakes....where's the fat? You're consuming so much protein and the excess is being converted to glucose. Try upping the fat and lowering your protein intake and you should notice better numbers. Many LCHF followers have low sodium so compensate with a bit of salt if you feel it will help. As for the potassium, is it that you don't like spinach or that it isn't providing adequate levels of potassium? Regardless, try adding brussel sprouts with bacon, asparagus and cabbage into your salads or as a side dish (not both). 126 may be good postprandial for a full meal, but 2 cups of salad and 1 cup of broccoli mixed with green beans? To me it seems that my diabetes is still showing up even though I'm on Atkins. I've run into a similar situation, where if all I have for a meal is salad, then I'm running in the 120's. I attribute it to poor meal proportions (fat to protein to carb), since it's nearly all carb (good carbs, but carbs nonetheless) except for the dressing. The dressing doesn't provide enough fat to offset the carbs. Not familiar with the Atkins shakes so I have nothing to say there. Abby, I see salad and vegetables (both proteins) and then protein shakes....where's the fat? You're consuming so much protein and the excess is being converted to glucose. Try upping the fat and lowering your protein intake and you should notice better numbers. Many LCHF followers have low sodium so compensate with a bit of salt if you feel it will help. As for the potassium, is it that you don't like spinach or that it isn't providing adequate levels of potassium? Regardless, try adding brussel sprouts with bacon, asparagus and cabbage into your salads or as a side dish (not both). Okay I use butter and cream, here's my Continue reading >>

Can Lchf Diets Lower Blood Sugar?

Can Lchf Diets Lower Blood Sugar?

Subra Velu , Low Carb High Fat LCHF works. Feeling stupid after 25 years of low fat diet If LCHF diet cannot reduce blood sugar, what else can? Any low carb diet will limit the blood sugar from spiking. However protein rich food may not reduce blood sugar a lot though it definitely helps in avoiding sugar spikes. The only problem with protein rich food is elevated gluconeogenesis which prevents blood sugar to go very low within the allowed limit. In my experience, low carb low-to-medium protein high Fat diet lowers blood sugar to 7377 level (Fasting) and high protein low carb medium fat keeps BG at 83100 level (Fasting). Heres a good analogy of why you have high blood sugar: Your drain is clogged. Glucose in the body normally enters things like muscle tissue. Except that in certain people insulin stops working and the glucose starts to back up. When you eat carbohydrate your faucet is still running. You are putting more glucose into a system that is already clogged. The glucose backs up into the blood and starts chemical reactions in the body. When you eat low carb, you stop that faucet running. You are also eating in ways that may help with the clog. Insulin resistance is complex but eating fewer carbs means you need less insulin to absorb those carbs. Lower insulin helps the body recover from chronic high levels of insulin. Let me first explain what blood sugar is. Blood sugar is also called blood glucose. Blood glucose is from carbs. Carbs are made of mostly glucose and fructose. It can be simple carbs such as sugar or complex carbs such as fruits or vegetables. They are all being broken down by the small intestines and being converted into glucose and fructose. Glucose goes to your blood stream and transports to your living cells for energy because glucose is the p Continue reading >>

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