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Lactic Acidosis Treatment With Sodium Bicarbonate

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Sodium Bicarbonate For The Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis - Sciencedirect

Volume 117, Issue 1 , January 2000, Pages 260-267 Sodium Bicarbonate for the Treatment of Lactic Acidosis Author links open overlay panel Sean M.ForsytheMDa Gregory A.SchmidtMD, FCCPb Get rights and content Lactic acidosis often challenges the intensivist and is associatedwith a strikingly high mortality. Treatment involves discerning andcorrecting its underlying cause, ensuring adequate oxygen delivery totissues, reducing oxygen demand through sedation and mechanicalventilation, and (most controversially) attempting to alkalinize theblood with IV sodium bicarbonate. Here we review the literature toanswer the following questions: Is a low pH bad? Can sodium bicarbonateraise the pH in vivo? Does increasing the blood pH withsodium bicarbonate have any salutary effects? Does sodium bicarbonatehave negative side effects? We find that the oft-cited rationale forbicarbonate use, that it might ameliorate the hemodynamic depression ofmetabolic acidemia, has been disproved convincingly. Further, given thelack of evidence supporting its use, we cannot condone bicarbonateadministration for patients with lactic acidosis, regardless of thedegree of acidemia. Continue reading >>

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  1. Victoria W(619)

    Raspberry ketone?

    Hi everyone,
    Just wondered if anyone has tried raspberry ketones. I have seen them advertised everywhere and wondered if they worked? Risky? Any side effects?

  2. Ayesha P(3)

    Hi I have been on raspberry ketone for 3 weeks and lost nothing. I think it's a load of crap. Spent £45 on it too got it shipped from america

  3. Victoria W(619)

    Oh so not the miracle they make out to be? I knew they sounded too good to be true. Let me know how you get on

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Use Of Bicarbonate In Lacticacidosis

Five days post emergency colorectal surgery, an elderlywoman, following a brief period of chest pain a few hours earlier, developed progressive hypotension and tachycardia on the ward. She had a background of hypertension, type 2 diabetes and a chronic left foot ulcer. On examination she was found to be clammy, mottled and peripherally vasoconstricted with a GCS of 15/15. Her abdomen was soft and non-tender. Her initial ECG had showed no ischaemic changes and subsequent ECGs showed only a sinus tachycardia. Initial blood gas analysis showed a metabolic acidosis (pH 7.21 Lactate 2.8mmol/l, HCO3 11.1mmol/l with a pCO2 of 2.7kPa). A starting differential diagnosis of a cardiac event, a pulmonary embolism, critical ischaemia or sepsis related to a hip or foot ulcer were made. Urgent orthopaedic and vascular review were obtained, and it was deemed that neither the hip, ulcer or vascular insufficiency were a likely source for the deterioration. Initially it was planned to transfer her for a CTPA, however she became progressively unstable, was no longer fluid responsive, and was intubated on the ward and transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for stabilisation. On arrival on ICU sh Continue reading >>

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  1. Thereze

    -my SO
    First time I've ever been happy about hearing that. Yay keto!

  2. _LiterallyAnybody_

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  3. solidalibi1992

    Hahaha my boyfriend says the same thing to me too. My response is always "ITS THE KETOOOO"

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https://www.facebook.com/drinkhealthy... - Do you want to learn how to get rid of lactic acid as an athlete, and start recovering quicker with more energy? Learn how to reduce lactic acid symptoms and increase your performance. Getting rid of lactic acid may be easier than you have imagined. Many professional athletes know the importance of eliminating lactic acid so they can recover quicker and perform at an optimal level. Start flushing out that lactic acid today! Many people suffer from lactic acidosis symptoms and are rigorously searching for a lactic acid treatment. More and more athletes are searching for solutions on how to get rid of lactic acid. In this video you will learn what a professional football player from the Seattle Seahawks is using to eliminate lactic acid after his workouts, practices, and NFL games. Learn how to make lactic acid a symptom of the past. Begin your journey to faster recovery today. See what the pro's are using to reduce lactic acid, recover quicker, and have more energy. Uncertain of what lactic is? Here is the definition https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactic_... Contact me for more information on getting rid of lactic acid FB: http://www.facebook.com/duncan.fraser... IG: http://www.instagram.com/kangendunc [email protected] See a full demonstration of this solution that helps get rid of lactic acid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTxR9... Duncan Fraser 0:00 - 0:13 - Introduction 0:14 - 2:11 - Shan Stratton and Michael Robinson Discuss how to get rid of lactic acid 2:11 - 2:21 - 4 benefits of this incredible technology 2:21 - 2:39 - Conclusion Get in contact with me if you have problems with lactic acid and learn more on my FB page. Visit my Facebook page below. https://www.facebook.com/drinkhealthy...

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic acidosis is a medical condition characterized by the buildup of lactate (especially L-lactate) in the body, which results in an excessively low pH in the bloodstream. It is a form of metabolic acidosis, in which excessive acid accumulates due to a problem with the body's metabolism of lactic acid. Lactic acidosis is typically the result of an underlying acute or chronic medical condition, medication, or poisoning. The symptoms are generally attributable to these underlying causes, but may include nausea, vomiting, rapid deep breathing, and generalised weakness. The diagnosis is made on biochemical analysis of blood (often initially on arterial blood gas samples), and once confirmed, generally prompts an investigation to establish the underlying cause to treat the acidosis. In some situations, hemofiltration (purification of the blood) is temporarily required. In rare chronic forms of lactic acidosis caused by mitochondrial disease, a specific diet or dichloroacetate may be used. The prognosis of lactic acidosis depends largely on the underlying cause; in some situations (such as severe infections), it indicates an increased risk of death. Classification[edit] The Cohen-Woods Continue reading >>

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  1. manohman

    Why can't fat be converted into Glucose?

    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?

  2. Czarcasm

    manohman said: ↑
    So the reason cited is that beta oxidation/metabolism of fats leads to formation of acetyl coa, a 2 carbon molecule, and that because of that it cannot be converted back into glucose.
    Why exactly is that the case?
    If Glucogenic amino acids can be converted into citric acid cycle intermediates and then turn back into glucose via gluconeogensis, then why cant Fatty Acids which yield Acetyl Coa. Can't you just have Acetyl Coa enter the citric acid cycle and produce the same intermediates that the glucogenic amino acids creat?
    Click to expand... Both glucose and fatty acids can be stored in the body as either glycogen for glucose (stored mainly in the liver or skeletal cells) or for FA's, as triacylglycerides (stored in adipose cells). We cannot store excess protein. It's either used to make other proteins, or flushed out of the body if in excess; that's generally the case but we try to make use of some of that energy instead of throwing it all away.
    When a person is deprived of nutrition for a period of time and glycogen stores are depleted, the body will immediately seek out alternative energy sources. Fats (stored for use) are the first priority over protein (which requires the breakdown of tissues such as muscle). We can mobilize these FA's to the liver and convert them to Acetyl-CoA to be used in the TCA cycle and generate much needed energy. On the contrary, when a person eats in excess (a fatty meal high in protein), it's more efficient to store fatty acids as TAG's over glycogen simply because glycogen is extremely hydrophilic and attracts excess water weight; fatty acids are largely stored anhydrously and so you essentially get more bang for your buck. This is evolutionary significant and why birds are able to stay light weight but fly for periods at a time, or why bears are able to hibernate for months at a time. Proteins on the other hand may be used anabolically to build up active tissues (such as when your working out those muscles), unless you live a sedentary lifestyle (less anabolism and therefore, less use of the proteins). As part of the excretion process, protein must be broken down to urea to avoid toxic ammonia and in doing so, the Liver can extract some of that usable energy for storage as glycogen.
    Also, it is worth noting that it is indeed possible to convert FA's to glucose but the pathway can be a little complex and so in terms of energy storage, is not very efficient. The process involves converting Acetyl-CoA to Acetone (transported out of mitochondria to cytosol) where it's converted to Pyruvate which can then be used in the Gluconeogenesis pathway to make Glucose and eventually stored as Glycogen. Have a look for yourself if your interested: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116.g003/originalimage (and this excludes the whole glycogenesis pathway, which hasn't even begun yet).
    TLDR: it's because proteins have no ability to be stored in the body, but we can convert them to glycogen for storage during the breakdown process for excretion. Also, in terms of energy, it's a more efficient process than converting FA's to glycogen for storage.

  3. soccerman93

    This is where biochem comes in handy. Czarcasm gives a really good in depth answer, but a simpler approach is to count carbons. The first step of gluconeogenesis(formation of glucose) requires pyruvate, a 3 carbon molecule. Acetyl Co-A is a 2 carbon molecule, and most animals lack the enzymes (malate synthase and isocitrate lyase) required to convert acetyl co-A into a 3 carbon molecule suitable for the gluconeogenesis pathway. The ketogenic pathway is not efficient, as czarcasm pointed out. While acetyl co-A can indeed be used to form citric acid intermediates, these intermediates will be used in forming ATP, not glucose. Fatty acid oxidation does not yield suitable amounts of pyruvate, which is required for gluconeogenesis. This is part of why losing weight is fairly difficult for those that are overweight, we can't efficiently directly convert fat to glucose, which we need a fairly constant supply of. Sorry, that got a little long-winded

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