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Lactic Acidosis In Dka

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much acid. It can also occur when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. There are several types of metabolic acidosis. Diabetic acidosis develops when acidic substances, known as ketone bodies, build up in the body. This most often occurs with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It is also called diabetic ketoacidosis and DKA. Hyperchloremic acidosis results from excessive loss of sodium bicarbonate from the body. This can occur with severe diarrhea. Lactic acidosis results from a buildup of lactic acid. It can be caused by: Alcohol Cancer Exercising intensely Liver failure Medicines, such as salicylates Other causes of metabolic acidosis include: Kidney disease (distal renal tubular acidosis and proximal renal tubular acidosis) Poisoning by aspirin, ethylene glycol (found in antifreeze), or methanol Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. SnowPetal

    Per week weightloss that is.

  2. thepapillon

    I've done this a few times while trying to lose weight... and am doing it now. I would say the first week you lose a lot. (5-7 pounds or so) After the first week I found it reduces to more like 3-4 pounds. I think it also depends on your weight. If you have extra weight, it'll come off easier than someone trying to get those last few pounds off. Good luck!

  3. SnowPetal

    That's good to know, thanks.
    I am also doing a lower calorie ketogenic diet as well. I'm hoping I can lose a pound a day like the hcg diet. But I will see.

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Lactic Acidosis In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Discussion Lactate acidosis is a common finding in DKA. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are responsible for the extremely high lactate values sometimes found in patients with ketoacidotic. Originally, elevated lactate values in patients with DKA were thought to be the result of inadequate tissue perfusion and oxygenation (due to a contracted intravascular volume, aggravated by the presence of macrovascular disease and microangiopathies, an increased amount of glycosylated Hb, and an abnormal platelet function).1–3 The resulting relative hypoxaemia stimulates the process of anaerobic glycolysis, where pyruvic acid is converted to l-lactate, yielding two ATP molecules. More recently, however, it was demonstrated that the metabolic derangements itself present in DKA might contribute as well to the elevated lactate levels.4 Various studies have reported the presence of a positive correlation between glucose levels and ketone (β-hydroxybutyrate) levels on the one hand, and lactate levels on the other hand.4 5 This could be explained by various intracellular and extracellular mechanisms. First, an increased amount of d-lactate is formed in erythrocytes. Since erythrocytes Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Saraleesaralee

    Is it possible to stay on ketogenic diet for life-long?

    I have been on ketogenic diet for 2 weeks. It controls my blood sugar level really well. However I am not over weight. And I am worried about potential long term side effects of the diet. For example, high LDL level, steoporosis, auto immune disease, too much weight loss, vesicular stiffness. I was wondering if there is anyone in this forum has been on ketogenic diet for years? And do you experience any side effects from the diet?

  2. Aaron1963

    I've been on a strict ketogenic diet for 6 months, and was doing LCHF for much of the 5 months prior to that but didn't make any attempts at it being ketogenic so I may have been in and out of ketosis some during that period. I now have a blood ketone meter and remain in ketosis according to it.
    I did suffer excessive weight loss initially. I lost about 40kg (about 90 lbs.), and it ended up sending me from being very obese to being underweight. But I've always eaten very little protein, which I continued to do, plus I was doing intermittent fasting, sometimes not eating anything for days at a time. Once I stopped the intermittent fasting and concentrated on getting adequate protein, my weight went back up to my ideal weight and stabilized there. I've heard from several people that you really need to watch your protein when doing a ketogenic diet being it's easy for excess to hinder weight loss and/or increase your BG.
    I have had a few issues while doing a ketogenic diet, but not 100% sure which if any can be attributed to ketosis vs. some other factor. First off, as winter was approaching I got extremely cold all the time, especially my fingers and toes, but even my whole body was cold. I thought it might have been the caffeine I was getting as part of my ketogenic diet involves drinking lots of coffee with HWC, coconut oil, and butter. I switched to decaf and the problem pretty much went away, but I don't know if it was the caffeine, the ketosis, the massive weight loss (lack of body fat), something else, or a combination of factors.
    I've also had excessive itching and a rash. That's normal for me during the winter months, but this year it started a bit early, went longer, and was much worse than normal. I think it may very well have been my usual sensitivity to the cold dry weather, aggravated by toxins released during my rapid weight loss, and perhaps ketones being emitted through the skin. It's just recently started to clear up and the rash is gone and most of the itching.
    I got keto-breath for a week or two when I first concentrated on going keto. It was very noticeable, but disappeared after that and no issues anymore with my breath.
    This diet is very sustainable for me. I tried my whole adult life to diet to lose weight and was never successful. This time I wanted to lose weight, but my primary focus was controlling my BG, meaning reducing carbs down to a low-carb level, which caused me to gravitate naturally to a LCHF diet. For the first time I have no desire to go back to my old way of eating. I love this diet and it's completely satisfying. So I killed two birds with one stone - got my BG under control, down to non-diabetic levels, and got my weight down to ideal. Plus with the huge benefits (IMHO) of having my body use ketones rather than glucose, I'm totally sold on this way of eating for the rest of my life and have absolutely no worries about not being able to stick to my diet. I really have no strong urges for carbs anymore, and only end up going off the plan rarely due to social pressures or inadvertently eating hidden/unknown carbs.
    My LDL has gone up, but I've heard from others that usually it's benign large fluffy LDL that typically goes up when on a ketogenic diet. And my body is still adjusting. Also I've heard that LDL by itself is not a good measure of risk. So I'm not worried about it, but will keep an eye on things. I also have taken my ketogenic diet to an extreme, hitting a KR of 3.0 or higher almost everyday, and sometimes up to 4.0 or more. Not sure if eating much more fat than necessary for ketosis affected my LDL any or not. Initially my LDL dropped significantly as well as my trigs, but both increased at my last doctor's visit. I may try a more normal KR in the future while monitoring my blood ketones to verify I stay in ketosis and see if there's any difference in my BG, cholesterol, or other tests.
    I did also suffer from other typical symptoms during my keto adaptation phase. Most went away within about two weeks. But it's just been here at the 6-month mark where my BG numbers suddenly stabilized with very little change, and quite low, and overall I just feel absolutely fantastic. I feel like I'm bursting with energy and joined a gym and suddenly love running and working out whereas I hated them all my life.
    Well, I don't have years of experience with ketosis to report anything to you about that. Other than I've heard lots of other people with years of experience and not heard of anyone having any real side effects other than the things I've mentioned. However some people do find ketosis isn't for them and give up very soon. For those that feel it is working for them and stick with it, seems there's no significant side effects. But I'll let the others who've been in ketosis for longer than me speak for themselves.

  3. furball64801

    Hi and welcome to DD I know of a guy called no more carbs that was on it over 2 yrs. It is possible he is still on it, that chat site closed down but he was going strong on it.

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To get mycotoxins out of your body, the best supplement is "Bind" from Systemic Formulas. It is an activated charcoal product. Here's a good anti-candida diet: http://www.myradiary.com/1214/candida.... Please like, share and subscribe to my YouTube page to get notifications whenever I post a new video! You have already taken the first step to better your health by watching my video! Next, I recommend that you join our Long Distance Patient Program so that you can get diet modification and supplement recommendations designed specifically for you by me or one of my fellow practitioners in our Ann Arbor, Michigan office. You have to be a patient of our office in order to receive supplements, per our distribution agreement with the producer of the Standard Process brand supplements. Becoming a Long Distance Patient as outlined below allows you that access. In order to be part of our online patient program, you would purchase an annual membership for $200. This membership includes an initial 30 minute phone appointment with me or one of our practitioners. At that time, the practitioner will make a recommendation to you for diet modifications, supplements and the quantities that you should take. After the phone call, you are able to order supplements for a year, as needed, directly from our website and our app. We will then promptly ship the supplements out to you. Follow up phone calls with your practitioner are $125 for a 20 minute phone/SKYPE appointment. If you would like to move forward and take advantage of this opportunity, please call: (734) 302-7575 or email [email protected] to schedule your phone appointment, and make the $200 payment. You can reach us by phone Monday through Saturday 9am-5pm EST. To learn more about our office and clinical practice, go to: http://thenutritionalhealingcenter.com Since not everyone is fortunate enough to live within driving distance of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and many feel that an telephone/online consultation is not enough to meet their clinical needs, I am happy to offer you our Long Distance Patient Travel Package. The package is comprised of a series of appointments with myself or another practitioner that are time sensitive, and a time allowance of 48-72 hours in our beautiful city is required. Not only are your health issues of concern thoroughly evaluated, but you receive a comprehensive full body evaluation, two different computerized cardiac health tests, a great deal of teaching and health education, and leave with a program of diet modification and supplement support that the practitioner is confident will improve your health and quality of life. This program can initiate your relationship with our clinic, and be followed up with telephone/online consultations, or it can be incorporated into your already existing program with our clinic to further enhance the program you already have in place. The cost for the Long Distance Travel Package is $560 and includes everything mentioned above. We also have a relationship with a lovely landmark hotel conveniently located less than 2 miles from our office, that offers a reduced nightly rate to our patients. In the meantime, if you are truly interested in what we have to offer, please watch these 5 important videos of mine: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... If you find my info helpful, please visit my Patreon page. https://www.patreon.com/drdarrenschmi... We look forward to helping you feel your best! This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. UCC 1-308 without prejudice.

Causes Of Lactic Acidosis

INTRODUCTION AND DEFINITION Lactate levels greater than 2 mmol/L represent hyperlactatemia, whereas lactic acidosis is generally defined as a serum lactate concentration above 4 mmol/L. Lactic acidosis is the most common cause of metabolic acidosis in hospitalized patients. Although the acidosis is usually associated with an elevated anion gap, moderately increased lactate levels can be observed with a normal anion gap (especially if hypoalbuminemia exists and the anion gap is not appropriately corrected). When lactic acidosis exists as an isolated acid-base disturbance, the arterial pH is reduced. However, other coexisting disorders can raise the pH into the normal range or even generate an elevated pH. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis", section on 'Assessment of the serum anion gap' and "Simple and mixed acid-base disorders".) Lactic acidosis occurs when lactic acid production exceeds lactic acid clearance. The increase in lactate production is usually caused by impaired tissue oxygenation, either from decreased oxygen delivery or a defect in mitochondrial oxygen utilization. (See "Approach to the adult with metabolic acidosis".) The pathophysiology and causes Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. __ish

    So, long story short, I remember reading somewhere that a great way to help speed your body's entry into ketosis is to do a 24 hour fast and some low intensity exercise. Trouble is, I can't seem to find where it was that I read that! Did I dream it up? Is this a thing?

  2. __loridcon

    i believe what you read is this:
    http://josepharcita.blogspot.com/2011/03/guide-to-ketosis.html#33EE

  3. __ish

    Yes! Thank you!
    I stopped eating at 3PM and did the wrong kind of exercise tonight instead of tomorrow morning, but that can be remedied.
    Has anyone had success with this method? This will be my first real go at keto.

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