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Lactic Acidosis Guidelines

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Publications Published: July 1998 Information on this subject has been updated. Read the most recent information. Dr P Pillans,former Medical Assessor, Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring (CARM), Dunedin Metformin is a useful anti-hyperglycaemic agent but significant mortality is associated with drug-induced lactic acidosis. Significant renal and hepatic disease, alcoholism and conditions associated with hypoxia (eg. cardiac and pulmonary disease, surgery) are contraindications to the use of metformin. Other risk factors for metformin-induced lactic acidosis are sepsis, dehydration, high dosages and increasing age. Metformin remains a major reported cause of drug-associated mortality in New Zealand. Of the 12 cases of lactic acidosis associated with metformin reported to CARM since 1977, 2 occurred in the last year and 8 cases had a fatal outcome. Metformin useful but small risk of potentially fatal lactic acidosis Metformin is a useful therapeutic agent for obese non-insulin dependent diabetics and those whose glycaemia cannot be controlled by sulphonylurea monotherapy. Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect. The reported frequency of lactic acidosis is 0.06 per 1000 patient-years, mostly in patients with predisposing factors.1 Examples of metformin-induced lactic acidosis cases reported to CARM include: A 69-year-old man, with renal and cardiac disease, was prescribed metformin due to failing glycaemic control on glibenclamide monotherapy. He was well for six weeks, then developed lactic acidosis and died within 3 days. Post-surgical lactic acidosis caused the death of a 70-year-old man whose metformin was not withdrawn at the time of surgery. A 56-year-old woman, with no predisposing disease, died from lactic acidosis following major Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Description Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis due to the inadequate clearance of lactic acid from the blood. Lactate is a byproduct of anaerobic respiration and is normally cleared from the blood by the liver, kidney and skeletal muscle. Lactic acidosis occurs when the body's buffering systems are overloaded and tends to cause a pH of ≤7.25 with plasma lactate ≥5 mmol/L. It is usually caused by a state of tissue hypoperfusion and/or hypoxia. This causes pyruvic acid to be preferentially converted to lactate during anaerobic respiration. Hyperlactataemia is defined as plasma lactate >2 mmol/L. Classification Cohen and Woods devised the following system in 1976 and it is still widely used:[1] Type A: lactic acidosis occurs with clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. Type B: lactic acidosis occurs without clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. It is further subdivided into: Type B1: due to underlying disease. Type B2: due to effects of drugs or toxins. Type B3: due to inborn or acquired errors of metabolism. Epidemiology The prevalence is very difficult to estimate, as it occurs in critically ill patients, who are not often suitable subjects for research. It is certainly a common occurrence in patients in high-dependency areas of hospitals.[2] The incidence of symptomatic hyperlactataemia appears to be rising as a consequence of the use of antiretroviral therapy to treat HIV infection. It appears to increase in those taking stavudine (d4T) regimens.[3] Causes of lactic acid Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

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Sustained Low-efficiency Dialysis As A Treatment Modality In A Patient With Lymphoma-associated Lactic Acidosis

Sustained Low-efficiency Dialysis As A Treatment Modality In A Patient With Lymphoma-associated Lactic Acidosis

Sustained low-efficiency dialysis as a treatment modality in a patient with lymphoma-associated lactic acidosis Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Correspondence and offprint requests to: M. Prikis, Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Search for other works by this author on: Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Search for other works by this author on: Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Search for other works Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear. They usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; a general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get emergency medical help right away. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep your recent prescription and your medical history with yo Continue reading >>

Congenital Lactic Acidosis

Congenital Lactic Acidosis

Causes Most cases of congenital lactic acidosis are caused by one or more inherited mutations of genes within the DNA located within the nucleus (nDNA) or within the mitochondria (mtDNA) of cells. Genes carry the genetic instructions for cells. A mutation is a change in a gene located in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA that may cause disease. Mutations of nDNA, which occur in cellular chromosomes, can be inherited through different forms of transmission of the mutation, including autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant or X-linked recessive inheritance. Mutations affecting the genes for mitochondria (mtDNA) are inherited from the mother. MtDNA that is found in sperm cells is typically lost during fertilization. As a result, all human mtDNA comes from the mother. An affected mother will pass on the mutation to all her children, but only her daughters will pass on the mutation to their children. Mitochondria, which are found by the hundreds or thousands in the cells of the body, particularly in muscle and nerve tissue, carry the blueprints for regulating energy production. As cells divide, the number of normal mtDNA and mutated mtDNA are distributed in an unpredictable fashion among different tissues. Consequently, mutated mtDNA accumulates at different rates among different tissues in the same individual. Thus, family members who have the identical mutation in mtDNA may exhibit a variety of different symptoms and signs at different times and to varying degrees of severity. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) deficiency is a genetic mitochondrial disease of carbohydrate metabolism that is due to a mutation in nDNA. It is generally considered to be the most common cause of biochemically proven cases of congenital lactic acidosis. PDC deficiency can be inherited as an autosom Continue reading >>

Can You Treat Lactic Acidosis By Dialysis?

Can You Treat Lactic Acidosis By Dialysis?

Can you treat lactic acidosis by dialysis? 10 Comments on Can you treat lactic acidosis by dialysis? Managing patients with lactic acidosis, especially the type A variety, is really hard! Usually they have multiple problems, are septic, hypotensive, often on multiple machines and the lactate keeps going up. The choices are between giving soda bicarb, carbicarb or dichloroacetate. The main purpose is to avoid some of complications of severe acidosis such arrhythmias, decreased response to cathechloamines, or reduced contractility. Bicarbonate therapy is a double-edged sword, however, because of the several side-effects such as decreased cardiac output, reduced ionized cardiac output, increased CO2 generation, volume overload and increased lactate generation. Paradoxically, it can also worsen intracellular acidosis. Staff managing these patients think that it would be great to simply clear it out using an extracorporeal therapy, such as hemodialysis or CRRT. Unfortunately it usually does not work. Lactate clearance by dialysis is only 3% of the overall clearance, most of which is in the tissue. In one study, they evaluated the utility of continuous venovenous hemofiltration with dialysis, to calculate lactate clearance by the hemofilter in 10 critically ill patients with acute renal failure and stable blood lactate concentrations. They found that the median blood lactate concentration increased despite renal replacement therapy. The median total plasma lactate clearance was 1379 ml/min (range, 754 to 1881 ml/min), and the median filter lactate clearance was 24 ml/min (range, 7 to 36 ml/min). The authors concluded that continuous venovenous hemofiltration with dialysis cannot meet lactate overproduction. Moreover, the generation of lactic acid is at least order of magnitu Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Sodium Bicarbonate, Tromethamine

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Sodium Bicarbonate, Tromethamine

Author: Kyle J Gunnerson, MD; Chief Editor: Michael R Pinsky, MD, CM, Dr(HC), FCCP, MCCM more... Treatment is directed towards correcting the underlying cause of lactic acidosis and optimizing tissue oxygen delivery. The former is addressed by various therapies, including administration of appropriate antibiotics, surgical drainage and debridement of a septic focus, chemotherapy of malignant disorders, discontinuation of causative drugs, and dietary modification in certain types of congenital lactate acidosis. Cardiovascular collapse secondary to hypovolemia or sepsis should be treated with fluid replacement. Both crystalloids and colloids can restore intravascular volume, but hydroxyethyl starch solutions should be avoided owing to increased mortality. [ 21 ] Excessive normal saline administration can cause a nongap metabolic acidosis due to hyperchloremia, which has been associated with increased acute kidney injury. [ 32 ] Balanced salt solutions such as Ringer lactate and Plasma-Lyte will not cause a nongap metabolic acidosis and may reduce the need for renal replacement therapy; however, these can cause a metabolic alkalosis. [ 33 ] No randomized, controlled trial has yet established the safest and most effective crystalloid. If a colloid is indicated, albumin should be used. Despite appropriate fluid management, vasopressors or inotropes may still be required to augment oxygen delivery. Acidemia decreases the response to catecholamines, and higher doses may be needed. Conversely, high doses may exacerbate ischemia in critical tissue beds. Careful dose titration is needed to maximize benefit and reduce harm. Lactic acidosis causes a compensatory increase in minute ventilation. Patients may be tachypneic initially, but respiratory muscle fatigue can ensue rapidly a Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Treatment is directed towards correcting the underlying cause of lactic acidosis and optimizing tissue oxygen delivery. The former is addressed by various therapies, including administration of appropriate antibiotics, surgical drainage and debridement of a septic focus, chemotherapy of malignant disorders, discontinuation of causative drugs, and dietary modification in certain types of congenital lactate acidosis. Cardiovascular collapse secondary to hypovolemia or sepsis should be treated with fluid replacement. Both crystalloids and colloids can restore intravascular volume, but hydroxyethyl starch solutions should be avoided owing to increased mortality. [21] Excessive normal saline administration can cause a nongap metabolic acidosis due to hyperchloremia, which has been associated with increased acute kidney injury. [32] Balanced salt solutions such as Ringer lactate and Plasma-Lyte will not cause a nongap metabolic acidosis and may reduce the need for renal replacement therapy; however, these can cause a metabolic alkalosis. [33] No randomized, controlled trial has yet established the safest and most effective crystalloid. If a colloid is indicated, albumin should be used. Despite appropriate fluid management, vasopressors or inotropes may still be required to augment oxygen delivery. Acidemia decreases the response to catecholamines, and higher doses may be needed. Conversely, high doses may exacerbate ischemia in critical tissue beds. Careful dose titration is needed to maximize benefit and reduce harm. Lactic acidosis causes a compensatory increase in minute ventilation. Patients may be tachypneic initially, but respiratory muscle fatigue can ensue rapidly and mechanical ventilation may be necessary. Alkali therapy remains controversial Continue reading >>

Should Dialysis Be Offered In All Cases Of Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis?

Should Dialysis Be Offered In All Cases Of Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis?

Should dialysis be offered in all cases of metformin-associated lactic acidosis? Metformin is commonly used in diabetes mellitus type 2, with lactic acidosis being a rare but potentially fatal complication of this therapy. The management of metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) is controversial. Treatment may include supportive care, activated charcoal, bicarbonate infusion, hemodialysis, or continuous venovenous hemofiltration. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Peters and colleagues systematically evaluated outcomes in MALA patients admitted to their intensive care unit. The mortality rate of patients who received dialysis was similar to that of patients who were not dialyzed. However, it was the more acutely and chronically ill patients who actually received dialysis. This suggests that hemodialysis was beneficial in preventing a higher mortality rate in those who required renal replacement therapy. Diabetes Mellitus TypeMetforminRenal Replacement TherapyAcute Kidney InjuryActivate Charcoal The literature on the management of metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA) is sparse and consists of case reports and case series. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Peters and colleagues [ 1 ] presented a retrospective cohort study in patients with MALA. This study represents an important step forward in systematically evaluating outcomes in this rare but serious condition. Metformin is commonly used in type 2 diabetes mellitus and accounts for approximately one third of all prescriptions for oral hypoglycemic agents in the US [ 2 ]. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study demonstrated impressive reductions in diabetes-related endpoints and mortality in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes who used this drug [ 3 ]. A rare but extremely serious adve Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis - Cancer Therapy Advisor

Lactic Acidosis - Cancer Therapy Advisor

Hyperlactatemia, anion gap metabolic acidosis, strong ion gap metabolic acidosis Tissue hypoperfusion, ischemia, anaerobic metabolism, shock, acid-base disorders Lactic acidosis associated with critical illness is commonly a byproduct of a much larger problem. In 1976 Cohen and Woods classified lactic acidosis based on etiology. Type A is due to clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion. Type B occurs in the absence of clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion. Type B is further divided into subgroups B1 - underlying disease/physiologic state; B2 - medication or toxin; and B3 - inborn errors of metabolism. In critically ill patients, lactic acidosis is typically associated with increased lactate production (hypoperfusion, mitochondrial dysfunction), and/or decreased metabolism/clearance. Approximately 1400 mmol of lactic acid is produced daily. The kidneys metabolize up to 30% with no significant elimination. The liver is very efficient in lactate metabolism and elimination and serum lactate levels should remain in the normal range until about 75% of hepatic function is lost. The clinical features of lactic acidosis are similar to other forms of metabolic acidoses. These may include respiratory compensatory signs such as tachypnea and Kussmaul respirations. Other clinical features are related to the underlying cause of lactic acidosis, such as signs of hypoperfusion. Hyperventilaton (rapid shallow or Kussmaul respirations). Seizure (generalized seizures can cause a transient lactic acidosis). Signs of hypovolemia (dry mucous membranes, decreased capillary refill, skin tenting, oliguria). Abdominal pain (especially with mesenteric ischemia). There may only be subtle clinical findings, therefore one needs to have a high suspicion in clinically relevent situations (e.g. i Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis Update For Critical Care Clinicians

Lactic Acidosis Update For Critical Care Clinicians

Lactic Acidosis Update for Critical Care Clinicians Franz Volhard Clinic and Max Delbrck Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical Faculty of the Charit Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany. Correspondence to Dr. Friedrich C. Luft, Wiltberg Strasse 50, 13125 Berlin, Germany. Phone: 49-30-9417-2202; Fax: 49-30-9417-2206; E-mail: luft/{at}fvk-berlin.de Abstract. Lactic acidosis is a broad-anion gap metabolic acidosis caused by lactic acid overproduction or underutilization. The quantitative dimensions of these two mechanisms commonly differ by 1 order of magnitude. Overproduction of lactic acid, also termed type A lactic acidosis, occurs when the body must regenerate ATP without oxygen (tissue hypoxia). Circulatory, pulmonary, or hemoglobin transfer disorders are commonly responsible. Overproduction of lactate also occurs with cyanide poisoning or certain malignancies. Underutilization involves removal of lactic acid by oxidation or conversion to glucose. Liver disease, inhibition of gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase (thiamine) deficiency, and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation are the most common causes. The kidneys also contribute to lactate removal. Concerns have been raised regarding the role of metformin in the production of lactic acidosis, on the basis of individual case reports. The risk appears to be considerably less than with phenformin and involves patients with underlying severe renal and cardiac dysfunction. Drugs used to treat lactic acidosis can aggravate the condition. NaHCO3 increases lactate production. Treatment of type A lactic acidosis is particularly unsatisfactory. NaHCO3 is of little value. Carbicarb is a mixture of Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 that buffers similarly to NaHCO3 but without net generation of CO2. The results from animal stud Continue reading >>

Metformin-related Lactic Acidosis: Case Report - Sciencedirect

Metformin-related Lactic Acidosis: Case Report - Sciencedirect

Open Access funded by Sociedad Colombiana de Anestesiologa y Reanimacin Lactic acidosis is defined as the presence of pH <7.35, blood lactate >2.0mmol/L and PaCO2 <42mmHg. However, the definition of severe lactic acidosis is controversial. The primary cause of severe lactic acidosis is shock. Although rare, metformin-related lactic acidosis is associated with a mortality as high as 50%. The treatment for metabolic acidosis, including lactic acidosis, may be specific or general, using sodium bicarbonate, trihydroxyaminomethane, carbicarb or continuous haemodiafiltration. The successful treatment of lactic acidosis depends on the control of the aetiological source. Intermittent or continuous renal replacement therapy is perfectly justified, shock being the argument for deciding which modality to use. We report a case of a male patient presenting with metformin poisoning as a result of attempted suicide, who developed lactic acidosis and multiple organ failure. The critical success factor was treatment with continuous haemodiafiltration. Definimos acidosis lctica en presencia de pH <7.35, lactato en sangre >2.0mmol/L y PaCO2 <42mmHg. Por otro lado, la definicin de acidosis lctica grave es controvertida. La causa principal de acidosis lctica grave es el estado de choque. La acidosis lctica por metformina es rara pero alcanza mortalidad del 50%. La acidosis metablica incluyendo a la acidosis lctica puede recibir tratamiento especfico o tratamiento general con bicarbonato de sodio, trihidroxiaminometano, carbicarb o hemodiafiltracin continua. El xito del tratamiento de la acidosis lctica yace en el control de la fuente etiolgica; la terapia de reemplazo renal intermitente o continua est perfectamente justificada, donde el argumento para decidir cul utilizar ser el estado de Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis.

Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis.

Severe lactic acidosis is often associated with poor prognosis. Recognition and correction of the underlying process is the major step in the treatment of this serious condition. Intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate has been the mainstay in the treatment of lactic acidosis. Aggressive use of this therapeutic modality, however, can lead to serious complications and should therefore be considered with caution. Peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis provide large amounts of alkali without causing the hypernatremia or hypervolemia commonly associated with bicarbonate infusion. Peritoneal dialysis with bicarbonate-based dialysate, in particular, appears to be an ideal means of delivering physiologic buffer. Administration of methylene blue was initially thought to increase lactate metabolism by altering the cellular oxidative state. Its subsequent clinical use, however, showed little efficacy. Sodium nitroprusside has been advocated for the treatment of some forms of lactic acidosis as a method of alleviating regional hypoperfusion. Insulin therapy has been found to be quite useful in the treatment of phenformin-associated lactic acidosis and is recommended in this setting. Since dichloroacetate activates pyruvate dehydrogenase and enhances lactate metabolism, it may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of lactic acidosis. Continue reading >>

Sustained Low-efficiency Dialysis As A Treatment Modality In A Patient With Lymphoma-associated Lactic Acidosis

Sustained Low-efficiency Dialysis As A Treatment Modality In A Patient With Lymphoma-associated Lactic Acidosis

Sustained low-efficiency dialysis as a treatment modality in a patient with lymphoma-associated lactic acidosis Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Correspondence and offprint requests to: M. Prikis, Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Search for other works by this author on: Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Search for other works by this author on: Division of Nephrology, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine and 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care and the University of Vermont College of Medicine, 1 South Prospect Street, Rehab 201, 05401-1473 Burlington VT, USA Search for other works Continue reading >>

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