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Ketosis Wiki

Talk:ketosis

Talk:ketosis

Ideal sources for Wikipedia's health content are defined in the guideline Wikipedia:Identifying reliable sources (medicine) and are typically review articles. Here are links to possibly useful sources of information about Ketosis. PubMed provides review articles from the past five years (limit to free review articles or to systematic reviews) The TRIP database provides clinical publications about evidence-based medicine. Other potential sources include: Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and CDC WikiProject Medicine (Rated C-class, Mid-importance) This article is within the scope of WikiProject Medicine, which recommends that medicine-related articles follow the Manual of Style for medicine-related articles and that biomedical information in any article use high-quality medical sources. Please visit the project page for details or ask questions at Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Medicine. C This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale. Mid This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale. This article is or was the subject of a Wiki Education Foundation-supported course assignment. Further details are available on the course page. Assigned student editor(s): Matt34am. Assigned peer reviews: Ashbyaa, Gruskyd. Ketosis v Ketoacidosis?[edit] My understanding is that these are parts of the same spectrum; severe ketosis is called ketoacidosis. This article implies that they're different things. Anyone have a source? Friday 21:24, 22 July 2005 (UTC) Yes, Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, see the section on the body's defense against hypoglycemia.--Silverback 06:32, July 23, 2005 (UTC) Sort of. Ketoacidosis is when you have so many ketone bodies that your blood becomes acidic. So it's sort of like having severe keto Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Diets

Low-carbohydrate Diets

Many promoters of dietary schemes would have us believe that a special substance or combination of foods will automatically result in weight reduction. That's simply not true. To lose weight, you must eat less, or exercise more, or do both. There are about 3,500 calories in a pound of body weight. To lose one pound a week, you must consume about 500 fewer calories per day than you metabolize. Most fad diets, if followed closely, will result in weight loss—as a result of caloric restriction. But they are usually too monotonous and are sometimes too dangerous for long-term use. Moreover, dieters who fail to adopt better exercise and eating habits will regain the lost weight—and possibly more. My advice to people who are considering a low-carbohydrate diet is not to try it on their own by reading a book but to seek supervision from a physician who can monitor what they do. The most drastic way to reduce caloric intake is to stop eating completely. After a few days, body fats and proteins are metabolized to produce energy. The fats are broken down into fatty acids that can be used as fuel. In the absence of adequate carbohydrate, the fatty acids may be incompletely metabolized, yielding ketone bodies and thus ketosis. Prolonged fasting is unsafe, because it causes the body to begin to digest proteins from its muscles, heart, and other internal organs. Low-carbohydrate diets also produce ketosis, but if properly designed, they enable the body's nutritional needs to be met by dietary protein, dietary fat, stored body fat, and stored glycogen, so that body muscles are spared [1]. As this "nutritional ketosis" begins, there is a diuretic (water loss) effect, leading the dieter to think that significant weight reduction is taking place. However, most of the early l Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The English used in this article or section may not be easy for everybody to understand. You can help Wikipedia by reading Wikipedia:How to write Simple English pages, then simplifying the article. (February 2012) Ketosis occurs when ketone bodies are released into the bloodstream due to low glycogen levels in the liver. Ketone bodies are created by the breakdown of fatty acid. Ketosis can be understood as the use of body fat as a source of energy. The body goes through ketosis when there is not enough carbohydrate to refill glycogen in the liver. An example of this kind of diet is the Atkins diet, where followers start by eating fewer than 20g of carbohydrates per day. It takes 48 hours for the brain to switch from glucose to ketone bodies. Ketosis helps the body prevent using protein, from muscles, for gluconeogenesis to make glucose. Ketosis In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of dietary carbohydrates (usually below 50g/day), the liver becomes the sole provider of glucose to feed your hungry organs – especially the brain, a particularly greedy entity accounting for ~20% of total energy expenditure. The brain cannot DIRECTLY use fat for energy. Once liver glycogen is depleted, without a backup energy source, humanity would’ve long disappeared in the eons of evolution. The backup is ketone bodies that the liver derives primarily from fatty acids in your diet or body fat. These ketones – ?-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), acetoacetate and Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Vegan Keto Wiki (aka Vegan Keto For Dummies)

The Ultimate Vegan Keto Wiki (aka Vegan Keto For Dummies)

Vegan Keto 101: So how do you even, like, vegan keto? The following is a compilation of keto vegan resources. From basics like ‘What is Low Carb Vegan’ and ‘Why Ketogenic Vegan’ to lists of my favourite keto vegan websites and bloggers, social media and vegan keto recipe sites. Hopefully this will make your transition to Keto Vegan a little easier! If I’ve missed anything please let me know by leaving a comment or emailing me at [email protected] Thanks! Renee Why Low Carb? – Healthful Pursuit’s How to be a low-carb Vegan – Low Carb Vegan’s Report on Vegan low carb diets: what the experts say – The Diet Doctor at dietdoctor.com/low-carb What is Ketosis? – Healthy Gamer Girl’s Guide to Vegan Keto – Reddit Keto Wikis: Draft Guidelines for Vegan Keto – Martina at ketodietapp.com’s Ketogenic Diet FAQ – Siim Land’s How to get into Vegan Ketosis and his eBook Vegan Keto Vegan Keto – Joseph Arcita’s Guide to Ketosis Vegan Friendly Keto Rockstars My number 1 rockstar is definitey Liz MacDowell – Holistic Nutritionist at meatfreeketo.com & healthygamergirl.com. Liz has two great vegetarian keto sites with lots of great keto faqs and vegan recipes. Her instagram is one of my favourites too and she has a podcast as well! She just realeased her eBook Meat Free Keto: How to thrive on a vegan ketogenic or low carb diet. Its a must read! There’s not many more exclusively low carb vegan sites, but there has been an explosion in the last few months which makes them hard to find on google. So… Introducing the Vegan Keto Fam! Im Renee (obviously) at herbivorepost.com but also: Madi – veganketomadi.weebly.com Meg – cleaneketoblog.com Kali – thewholesomeholistic.com Also vegan anf low carb is Martine at lowcarb-vegan.net! Maria at mar Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet

Low-carb Diet

The low-carb diet (also, Low-Carb High Fat (LCHF)) has been popularized in recent years through many fad diets such as Atkins, SugarBusters!, The Zone, South Beach Diet, Protein Power, the paleo diet, Tim Ferriss' slow-carb diet and several others. The variety of low carb diets, and the revisions of existing low/lower carb diets, has produced a range of low and lower carb diets that are healthy ways to lose weight. However, there are still a host of woo-related low carb and no-carb fad diets out there. Carb, protein, fat?[edit] Before any explanation of this can begin, it is important to understand what carbohydrates, protein, and fat are. Everything you consume, at a nutritional level, is water, a mineral, a micronutrient, or a macronutrient.[1] Minerals are non-organic substances that your body needs to survive, like calcium and iron. How do we know, or rather define, them as organic or inorganic? Basically, if it has carbon in it, it is organic. Simple as that. Micronutrients are generally vitamins. Carbohydrates, protein, and fat are macronutrients and they give your body calories. Each one has their own properties based on the composition of their elements (each having a unique mixture and structure of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen), and other chemicals that make up the specific molecules. Each one plays a different role in your body and gives a different amount of calories per gram (4 per gram of protein or carbohydrate, and 9 per gram of fat)[2][3]. There's a huge and technical listing of things that each one does and how they function, and their relation to each other and every other element of your nutrition, especially when you start talking about the different kinds of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. The short version is that fat is used by your body to maint Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Classification and external resources Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides most of the energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet, and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Cause Ketoacidosis Ketone bodies are acidic, but acid-base homeostasis in the blood is normally maintained through bicarbonate buffering, respiratory compensation to vary the amount of CO2 in the bloodstream, hydrogen ion absorption by tissue proteins and bone, and renal compensation t Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Not to be confused with slow carb diet. This article is about low carbohydrate diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss. For low-carbohydrate dietary therapy for epilepsy, see Ketogenic diet. Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Foods high in easily digestible carbohydrates (e.g., sugar, bread, pasta) are limited or replaced with foods containing a higher percentage of fats and moderate protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (e.g., most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), although other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate allowed varies with different low-carbohydrate diets.[1] Such diets are sometimes 'ketogenic' (i.e., they restrict carbohydrate intake sufficiently to cause ketosis). The induction phase of the Atkins diet[2][3][4] is ketogenic. The term "low-carbohydrate diet" is generally applied to diets that restrict carbohydrates to less than 20% of caloric intake, but can also refer to diets that simply restrict or limit carbohydrates to less than recommended proportions (generally less than 45% of total energy coming from carbohydrates).[5][6] Definition and classification[edit] Low-carbohydrate diets are not well-defined.[7] The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[8] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[9] Used for Continue reading >>

Ketogenesis

Ketogenesis

Ketogenesis pathway. The three ketone bodies (acetoacetate, acetone, and beta-hydroxy-butyrate) are marked within an orange box Ketogenesis is the biochemical process by which organisms produce a group of substances collectively known as ketone bodies by the breakdown of fatty acids and ketogenic amino acids.[1][2] This process supplies energy to certain organs (particularly the brain) under circumstances such as fasting, but insufficient ketogenesis can cause hypoglycemia and excessive production of ketone bodies leads to a dangerous state known as ketoacidosis.[3] Production[edit] Ketone bodies are produced mainly in the mitochondria of liver cells, and synthesis can occur in response to an unavailability of blood glucose, such as during fasting.[3] Other cells are capable of carrying out ketogenesis, but they are not as effective at doing so.[4] Ketogenesis occurs constantly in a healthy individual.[5] Ketogenesis takes place in the setting of low glucose levels in the blood, after exhaustion of other cellular carbohydrate stores, such as glycogen.[citation needed] It can also take place when there is insufficient insulin (e.g. in type 1 (but not 2) diabetes), particularly during periods of "ketogenic stress" such as intercurrent illness.[3] The production of ketone bodies is then initiated to make available energy that is stored as fatty acids. Fatty acids are enzymatically broken down in β-oxidation to form acetyl-CoA. Under normal conditions, acetyl-CoA is further oxidized by the citric acid cycle (TCA/Krebs cycle) and then by the mitochondrial electron transport chain to release energy. However, if the amounts of acetyl-CoA generated in fatty-acid β-oxidation challenge the processing capacity of the TCA cycle; i.e. if activity in TCA cycle is low due to low amo Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Seen in patients with recent history of binge drinking with little/no nutritional intake Anion gap metabolic acidosis associated with acute cessation of ETOH consumption after chronic abuse Characterized by high serum ketone levels and an elevated AG Consider other causes of elevated AG, as well as co-ingestants Concomitant metabolic alkalosis can occur from dehydration (volume depletion) and emesis Ethanol metabolism depletes NAD stores[1] Results in inhibition of Krebs cycle, depletion of glycogen stores, and ketone formation High NADH:NAD also results in increased lactate production Acetoacetate is metabolized to acetone so elevated osmolal gap may also be seen Differential Diagnosis Starvation Ketosis Binge drinking ending in nausea, vomiting, and decreased intake Positive serum ketones Wide anion gap metabolic acidosis without alternate explanation Urine ketones may be falsely negative or low Lab measured ketone is acetoacetate May miss beta-hydroxybutyrate Consider associated diseases (ie pancreatitis, rhabdomyolysis, hepatitis, infections) Oral nutrition if able to tolerate Consider bicarb if life-threatening acidosis (pH <7.1) unresponsive to fluid therapy Discharge home after treatment if able to tolerate POs and acidosis resolved Consider admission for those with severe volume depletion and/or acidosis Hypoglycemia is poor prognostic feature, indicating depleted glycogen stores See Also Continue reading >>

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet

A cyclic ketogenic diet (or carb-cycling) is a low-carbohydrate diet with intermittent periods of high or moderate carbohydrate consumption. This is a form of the general ketogenic diet that is used as a way to maximize fat loss while maintaining the ability to perform high-intensity exercise. A ketogenic diet limits the number of grams of carbohydrate the dieter may eat, which may be anywhere between 0 and 50g per day. The remainder of the caloric intake must come primarily from fat sources, as well as protein sources, in order to maintain ketosis. (Ketosis is the condition in which the body burns fats and uses ketones instead of glucose for fuel.) The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet can be complex, as it requires the dieters to closely watch the number of carbohydrate grams they eat during the intermittent period that they are not maintaining a strictly low carb/moderate protein diet.[1] When following a low carbohydrate diet, for the first few days, there is an adaptation period during which most people report feeling run-down or tired. Some people report feeling irritable, out of sorts, and unable to make decisions. For most people these feelings disappear after the adaptation period, however, and are replaced with feelings of calm and balance, and more consistent energy.[1] Although most people report a waning of cravings while in ketosis, some people may crave carbohydrates during ketosis for psychological reasons. During a hypocaloric ketogenic diet, the carb cravings may combine with hunger pangs, making matters worse.[2] (However, it is noteworthy that most people report having no hunger pangs on a ketogenic diet, due to its higher fat and protein contents, which help to increase a sense of fullness).[1] A CKD offers a way to combat this. It offers a cyclical "refeed" Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Experiment

Ketogenic Experiment

I used the Ketogenic Diet for 7 months, running an average of 85 miles/week, peaking at 200 miles/week, including over 50 marathon length runs. I was surprised how little impact the Ketogenic Diet had on my running, and I could maintain my training regime without difficulty. However I was not able to race successfully on the Ketogenic Diet and I found the Ketogenic Diet difficult to comply with. This write up should not be considered as scientific in any way; it is simply my anecdotal experience. As an ultrarunner, I've experimented with Low Carbohydrate Diets (LCD) before with little success. I found that running on LCD let me feeling like I was permanently Glycogen depleted. However, after reading The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance and Ketogenic Diets: Treatments for Epilepsy and Other Disorders I decided to experiment with a true Ketogenic Diet which is quite different from most general Low Carb Diets. I was on the Ketogenic Diet from March to November of 2013 (~7 months). For some of the time I was on the Ketogenic Diet I analyzed my food in detail. During this time my average diet was 3,740 Calories/day, 357g fat, 53g carbs, 27g fiber (26g Net Carbohydrates), and 88g protein. This is a Ketogenic Ratio of 3.13:1, and the calories ware 87.6% fat, 2.8% carbohydrate, 9.6% protein. I found the ketogenic diet remarkably hard work and tiresome. The food choices were grim, and it was not really possible to eat anything even vaguely like a normal diet. Even bacon was too low in fat to be eaten freely. I found my body fat dropped to its lowest level ever. However, I'm not sure how much of that is the Ketogenic Diet directly and how much is because I was analyzing everything I was eating, so I was far more aware of any excess calorie intake. Another possibili Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About The Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

What You Should Know About The Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Though it was originally developed to treat patients with epilepsy, interest in the ketogenic diet has taken off in recent years as we've learned more about its therapeutic and health benefits. Here’s what you need to know about ‘keto’ and why some health experts believe it's good for your body — especially your brain. Fasting and other ketogenic-like diets have been used to treat conditions like epilepsy for thousands of years. And in fact, a version of the keto diet has been traced back to 500 BC. Fast forwarding a bit, Dr. Rawle Geyelin gave a 1921 presentation to the American Medical Association in which he reported on the remarkable outcomes of several children who had benefited from fasting; his patients were having fewer seizures — and the effect appeared to be long-lasting. Geyelin continued this work, and he developed a tolerable and reproducible high-fat and low carbohydrate diet now formally known as the ketogenic diet. For the next two decades, it was used by physicians to minimize seizures in their patients. Once modern antiepileptic drugs were introduced, however, the practice declined dramatically. But interest in keto was renewed about 20 years ago as a number of scientists began to study it more closely — and not just for its ability to treat epilepsy. As we’re now learning, and despite its reputation as a “starvation” diet, a keto regimen has been shown to confer a variety of benefits. The state of ketosis The ketogenic diet is essentially a way to get our bodies to enter into a condition known as ketosis. Normally, our bodies rely on glucose for fuel — the result of our moderate to high-carb diets. Carbohydrates are broken down to glucose, which gets converted into energy and transported to our muscles and organs. But when carbs ar Continue reading >>

How To Start A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss

How To Start A Ketogenic Diet For Weight Loss

Expert Reviewed A ketogenic diet (also known as “nutritional ketosis”) is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. On a ketogenic diet, your brain uses ketones (a byproduct of your fat-burning metabolism) for fuel, instead of glucose.[1] Since humans can burn either glucose or ketones for energy, this change is possible to make, although there is some controversy surrounding ketogenic diets regarding both their efficacy and health benefit.[2] Ketosis keeps your body in a “fasting” or starvation metabolism, and consequently encourages weight loss by burning off fat reserves. While the shift to a ketogenic diet can be difficult initially, you should begin to see results after a few weeks. 1 Talk to your doctor. Although the ketogenic diet is grounded in medical and nutritional fact, there is not a universal opinion in the medical community that the diet is effective for weight-loss. Your personal doctor will be able to advise you if the diet is a good fit for you personally. Some sources view a ketogenic diet as an effective way to counter the symptoms of certain illnesses — such as epilepsy — rather than a weight-loss diet.[3] If you are pregnant or diabetic, work with your doctor so they can monitor and adjust your medications while you follow this diet. [4] If you are type-1 diabetic, seek permission from a doctor well-trained in nutrition before you start this diet. 2 Recognize the possible risks of a ketogenic diet. A ketogenic diet — and putting your body into ketosis generally — presents risks for anyone who suffers from heart or kidney problems.[5] If you are at risk for heart disease or kidney disease, avoid ketogenic diets. A ketogenic diet prescribes moderate amounts of proteins, and large amounts of fats. A ketogenic diet will also Continue reading >>

Keto In A Nutshell

Keto In A Nutshell

What the Hell is a Ketogenic Diet? A hit-the-ground-running introduction to not being fat any more" ~ keto4life, 2016 Ketogenic Diets have grown in popularity and criticism over the last twenty or so years. Popular Ketogenic Diets include: South Beach Diet, Atkins Diet (induction phase only) and several natural diets all over the world used by various tribes and peoples. 1. What Does Keto Do to My Body? Ketosis, to put it simply, is the state in which you burn fat for fuel. The human body isn’t stupid, it will burn what it has in most abundance that yields the most energy for its volume. Carbs (some) burn up quick but are packed with INTENSE fuel that yield large bursts of energy. Compare this to an energy drink that a lot of modern culture seems to adore. Fat and protein burn slowly and allow a steady stream of energy; your energy levels won’t soon crash because your body can’t get rid of it near as fast as carbohydrates. Ketosis also helps regulate your blood without complications. Involving complex carbs into your diet causes your body to heighten your blood sugar and as a result produce insulin. This stuff is nasty in large amounts; consider it to be your blood’s very own personal, fat-kicking police force. High blood sugar is interpreted as TOXIC by your body, so the insulin regulates your blood to cleanse it. Soon, though, your body starts struggling to keep up; when you take high amounts of carbs (sugar) and the insulin cant keep up....your body converts sugar to fat and insulin stores it in cells. Your body is capable of regulating your blood sugar on its own without help when you aren’t mainlining so much sucrose. Ketogenic diets avoid such problems! “But what about heart disease and cholesterol? I DON’T WANNA DIE; BACON ISN’T WORTH IT!” There Continue reading >>

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