diabetestalk.net

Ketosis When To Eat Carbs

All You Need To Know About Carbs On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

All You Need To Know About Carbs On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

When it comes to ideal carbs intake, I've discussed it in my post here: How Many Carbs per Day on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? However, daily carbs intake is not the only aspect you should focus on. Does our body need carbs? It's a common misconception that our body, especially our brain needs carbs. In fact, the brain can either use glucose or ketones. When you restrict the intake of carbohydrates, your body will switch to using ketone bodies instead of using glucose. Not only that, ketones are a better fuel for our body and brain than glucose, even for highly active individuals. Once you get keto-adapted (3-4 weeks), you will experience improved energy levels. Although a small amount of glucose is still needed, our body can produce glucose on demand via gluconeogenesis. Dr Volek and Dr Phinney, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance (2012): "Ketone bodies are an important lipid-based fuel, especially for the brain, when dietary carbohydrates are restricted." It has been estimated that about 200 grams of glucose can be generated daily just from protein (Dr Briffa, Escape the Diet Trap, 2012). Our body needs some glucose (e.g. for the thyroid health) but according to Dr Volek, it's a very small amount. As I said in my post here, there is no need for everybody to follow a very low-carb / "zero-carb" diet and you may need to adjust the level of carbs to fit your needs. Types of carbs in ketogenic diets Generally, you should avoid any sugary or starchy foods. The best measure to represent "good" and "bad" carbohydrates is their Glycemic Load (GL), which measures how much insulin will be released by your body for a given food measured in standard portions. This is different to Glycemic Index (GI), which doesn't take the serving size into account. As a result, some Continue reading >>

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The “rule of thumb” for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not “net”): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Fat: to satiety Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right — an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK — but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get “into” ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. I’m a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one per Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

In my previous post, How to Exercise on a Keto Diet, I outlined the some of the basic facts about exercise and the most common myths. In this and future posts, I'd like to focus on nutrition aspects of exercise. Foods containing carbs are not all evil and I'll explain when clean paleo-friendly carbs can be used even on a keto diet. Let's start by busting some of the most common myths... Carbs and Performance Do we need carbs for better performance? One of the most common myths is that low-carb eating will negatively affect your performance. This is down to studies that ignore keto-adaptation and only focus on the immediate effects of carb restriction. There is, indeed, a transitional period in which performance drop occurs but it only lasts for a few weeks. Once you get keto-adapted (usually 3-4 weeks), your body will switch from using glucose to using ketones and fatty acids as the main source of energy. This study performed on elite athletes shows that a keto diet does not affect strength performance. Eight athletes over a period of 30 days were fed virtually a zero carb diet and didn't experience any drop in performance. In fact, more and more studies are showing the beneficial effects of keto-adaptation. Even athletes that are doing very long cardio training or marathons can follow a keto diet. Timothy Allen Olson is just one of the many super athletes who have proven to be thriving almost purely on a diet that is best described as low-carb, keto and paleo. However, Timothy doesn't follow a standard ketogenic diet - he eats carbs strategically. Before or after his workouts he eats clean carbs such as sweet potatoes and fruits. He also uses glucose gels on training runs. Everyone is different and although some may thrive on a Standard Ketogenic Diet, others may benef Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

Reach Ketosis In 3 Days

Reach Ketosis In 3 Days

Low carbers know ketosis is the superhero of fat burning. Want to get there quickly? Try a few rapid keto techniques and eat specific low carb foods. Why ketosis makes a difference in fat loss Fast 3-Day Keto technique Printable list of 200 keto foods Online keto calculator When carbs are restricted or absent from your diet, your body must rely almost solely on fat for energy. Ketosis happens when your carb levels are very low, 20 to 50 carbs (or less) per day. How to Reach Ketosis Quickly The fastest way to reach ketosis using your diet is by limiting carbs: 20 to 50 grams per day, or less than 10% of total daily calories. Some low carbers eat less than 5%. Specific diet and exercise techniques, such as intermittent fasting and high intensity interval training (HIIT) workout routines help you get into ketosis quickly and maximize your fat loss. 3 Day Keto Technique This keto method helps eliminate liver glycogen stores rapidly. Follow this plan exactly, and you’ll reach ketosis within a few days. Day 1 Eat low carb during the day or avoid fruit, starchy veggies, grains, sugary treats, rice, bread and pasta. Do not eat anything after 6 pm. Day 2 In the morning before eating, perform a HIIT routine, another kind of intense exercise or weight training. Start eating a ketogenic diet with 0 to 2% of calories from carbs. (0 to 5 grams of net carbs per 1000 daily calories.) Example: 2% of 1000 daily calories = 20 calories. Carbs have 4 calories per gram, so 20 calories = 5 carbs. Day 3 In the morning (before eating) perform medium intensity, steady state exercises or weight training. Continue eating high fat keto foods. (Optional) Add extra butter, coconut oil or MCT oil to your meals. Allow no more than 5% of your total daily calories from carbs. How to Know You’re in Ke Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

What Is The Impact On Brain Function If You Eat A Diet That Is Low In Carbs, But Not Low Enough To Induce Ketosis?

What Is The Impact On Brain Function If You Eat A Diet That Is Low In Carbs, But Not Low Enough To Induce Ketosis?

I think you are worried that if you reduce your carbs, you brain will not get enough energy. This is not true, since the body is getting energy from both carbs and fats are the same time unless there is an extra scarcity (ketosis) or abundance of glucose. This graphic from Peter Attia's blog, gives you an idea of how this looks. If you are looking for an exact answer of how many carbohydrates to consume, I can't give that to since different individuals respond to carbohydrates differently. But, the graphic tells you is that as you reduce your carbohydrates your body will compensate to ensure it has enough energy. The benefit of a low-carb diet is that your blood sugar does not spike or fall too low. This ensure a more stable source of energy for the brain which should prevent the late afternoon slowdown. You can see in the chart below, that the low-carbohydrate diet group has a much more stable blood sugar levels. You can read the study, I stole this graphic from here: Dietary carbohydrate restriction in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome: time for a critical appraisal. Continue reading >>

How Long Can You Stay In Ketosis Safely?

How Long Can You Stay In Ketosis Safely?

Are you looking for a diet for weight-loss or fat-loss? If so then you might be interested in ketosis. The question is whether you can stay on it permanently. That’s because it’s critical for any ‘diet” to become part of your everyday life and eating habits. It’s important to first understand what it is all about. It’s a natural state of the human body when it’s fueled almost 100% by body fat. This state takes place during a low-carb or “keto” diet as well as during fasting. It’s important to understand how this process is related to fat loss. The term originates from the fact that the human produce produces tin fuel molecules known as “ketones.” When the body doesn’t have enough blood sugar/glucose it gets energy from this source. The body produces chemicals when it gets a very low supply of carbs and a moderate amount of protein. The liver’s fat produces ketones then the body and brain use it for fuel. The process is especially important for the brain since the organ can only run from glucose/ketones. Medical research shows that early humans probably experienced the state very often. The reason is that hunter-gatherer societies ate a high-meat diet and had less access to carbohydrates than modern humans. As a result human bodies evolved so they could get energy from fat even though it mimicked starvation mode. Today there are various reasons why people use the ketogenic meal plan. Some of the most common ones are to lose weight or control epilepsy. The firm supporters point out the health benefits of the diet but others note that it’s a dangerous “hack” of the body’s regular metabolic system. These are the benefits to this process: Less eating due to no appetite More fat loss from abdominal cavity Lower blood sugar/insulin levels Lo Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Plan

Ketogenic Diet Plan

A ketogenic diet plan improves your health through a metabolic switch in the primary cellular fuel source to which your body and brain are adapted. When your metabolism switches from relying on carbohydrate-based fuels (glucose from starch and sugar) to fat-based fuels and fat metabolism products called ketones, positive changes in the health of your cells occur, and this translates into better overall health. A metabolic process called ketogenesis and a body state called ketosis are responsible. Ketosis is simply a normal metabolic pathway in which body and brain cells utilize ketones to make energy, instead of relying on only sugar (i.e., carbohydrate). In fact, humans developed an evolutionary ability to burn ketones as an adaptation to periods of time when food was unavailable, and being in nutritional ketosis is a beneficial body state. A great deal of research is being done on ketosis as it relates to disease. Ketone bodies have some very beneficial effects on the human body, and elevating one's blood levels of ketone bodies is an effective treatment for many disease conditions because it improves the function of cellular energy pathways and mitochondrial health. Ketogenic diets are now being used to treat medical conditions such as diabetes, epilepsy, autism, Alzheimer's, cancer and others and much of the success of these treatments is rooted in these cellular effects. This page will answer some questions you may have about a ketogenic diet plan including: Who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet: list of medical contraindications. How do I start a ketogenic diet plan? Do I need to worry about the "dangers of low carb diets"? What are the side effects of a ketogenic diet? What are the benefits of a ketogenic diet? But first a little legal and medical coverage: Alth Continue reading >>

When On A Very Low Carb Diet Or In Ketosis, Is It Bad To Fast A Lot, Like, Eating Only One Or Two Meals A Day? Or Should I Only Do This Every Other Day?

When On A Very Low Carb Diet Or In Ketosis, Is It Bad To Fast A Lot, Like, Eating Only One Or Two Meals A Day? Or Should I Only Do This Every Other Day?

There are no doubt advantages to intermittent fasting, but I wouldn't recommend it while you're on a low carb diet. When your body can't use carbohydrates to obtain energy it will switch to use other components in your body. You'll be happy to see any fat go, but unfortunately the proteins that make up your muscles aren't safe from being used. Not to mention by fasting while you're already on a high-demand diet, your body will be entirely out of balance. Getting a dangerously low blood sugar level would be a very likely to happen. Take it slow and listen to your body. I follow a strict intermittent fasting requisite and during my 'eating window' I eat mostly paleo/primal - which is very low carb. It's been over 6 months of daily intermittent fasting now. This has had HUGE benefits on my mind and body - my whole way of life, really. It can be kind of tough to stick with it during the first two weeks, but give it a shot and see how you feel. How To Start Your Intermittent Fasting Requisite And Avoid Hangovers | Avoiding Hangovers Continue reading >>

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE The ketogenic diet has become quite popular recently. Studies have found that this very low-carb, high-fat diet is effective for weight loss, diabetes and epilepsy. There’s also early evidence to show that it may be beneficial for certain cancers, Alzheimer’s disease and other diseases, too. A ketogenic diet typically limits carbs to 20–50 grams per day. While this may seem challenging, many nutritious foods can easily fit into this way of eating. Here are 16 healthy foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. 1. Seafood Fish and shellfish are very keto-friendly foods. Salmon and other fish are rich in B vitamins, potassium and selenium, yet virtually carb-free. However, the carbs in different types of shellfish vary. For instance, while shrimp and most crabs contain no carbs, other types of shellfish do. While these shellfish can still be included on a ketogenic diet, it’s important to account for these carbs when you’re trying to stay within a narrow range. Here are the carb counts for 3.5-ounce (100-gram) servings of some popular types of shellfish: Clams: 5 grams Mussels: 7 grams Octopus: 4 grams Oysters: 4 grams Squid: 3 grams Salmon, sardines, mackerel and other fatty fish are very high in omega-3 fats, which have been found to lower insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese people. In addition, frequent fish intake has been linked to a decreased risk of disease and improved mental health. Aim to consume at least two servings of seafood weekly. Summary: Many types of seafood are carb-free or very low in carbs. Fish and shellfish are also good sources of vitamins, minerals and omega-3s. 2. Low-Carb Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables are low in calories and carbs, but high in many nutrients, including vita Continue reading >>

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

Keep Yourself In Ketosis

When talking about a Grain Brain lifestyle, and the very similar ketogenic diet, it’s frequently mentioned that we are aiming to keep our bodies in ketosis. However, if you’re new to my work, it may be that you’re not exactly sure what ketosis is, or why we should be worrying about getting our body into this state. Allow me to explain. Ketones are a special type of fat that can stimulate the pathways that enhance the growth of new neural networks in the brain. A ketogenic diet is one that is high in fats, and this diet has been a tool of researchers for years, used notably in a 2005 study on Parkinson’s patients finding an improvement in symptoms after just 28 days. The improvements were on par with those made possible via medication and brain surgery. Other research has shown the ketogenic diet to be remarkably effective in treating some forms of epilepsy, and even brain tumors. Ketones do more than just that though. They increase glutathione, a powerful, brain-protective antioxidant. Ketones facilitate the production of mitochondria, one of the most important actors in the coordinated production that is the human body. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Our bodies are said to enter ketosis at the point when blood sugar levels are low and liver glycogen are no longer available to produce glucose as a fuel for cellular energy production. At this point, not only is the body doing the natural thing, and burning off fat, it’s also powering up the brain with a super efficient fuel. We can jump start ourselves into ketosis with a brief fast, allowing our body to quickly burn through the carbs that are in our system, and turn to fat for fuel. A ketogenic diet is one that derives around 80% or more of of its calories from fat, and the rest from carbs and prote Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

I'm often asked about popular diets, so this week and next I'm covering two popular diets - the Keto Diet this week, and Whole30 next week - including the pros, cons and my take for each. I am not advocating or recommending that we all follow these programs. While these diets - or components of these diets - may be beneficial to some, my recommendation for the majority of the population is to keep it simple, streamlined, wholesome - less about hard rules with lists of do's and don't's, and more about the key fundamentals: limit added sugars and white carbs. Emphasize lean proteins. Tons of vegetables, some fruits (mostly berries), and more of an emphasis on plant based fats when possible. Find what works for your individual lifestyle, taste preferences, budget and schedule. If you do choose to try one or some of these popular diets, use it as an opportunity to help break and replace not-so-good habits, and to educate yourself and learn more about how you may respond to certain foods and ingredients so that you can make lasting behavioral changes that can stick around long after you're "off" of a particular diet plan. *** "I'm going keto." I'm hearing this more and more often. And odds are you've heard someone talk about "going keto," you've considered it yourself, or at the very least, you've seen "keto-friendly" products and recipes in stores, magazines, and social media. Keto is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, with limited protein allowed as well. As with many of these diets, healthful food selections within each of those food categories is what determines whether the diet is healthful. The keto diet's origins "Keto" is short for "ketogenic" and is a type of diet that has been used for 100-plus years for children with uncontrolled seizures. Approximately half of th Continue reading >>

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Diets Decoded: The Ketogenic Diet

Is the ketogenic diet healthy? We’re going to let you in on a little secret. Most popular healthy diets that are touted for weight loss—from Paleo to Mediterranean and vegetarian—share many of the same basic principles. All involve eating whole foods (as opposed to packaged and processed) and filling your plate with quality sources of protein, healthy fats, complex carbohydrates, and vitamin-, mineral-, and fiber-rich vegetables. (Again, we’re talking about the ones that fall somewhere on the healthy spectrum, not unhealthy fad diets like, ahem, the Grapefruit Diet.) However, each proposes a slightly different path that leads to fulfilling those principles. In this column, we’ll be breaking them down for you one by one so you can figure out which (if any!) is right for you. We’ll quickly explain the facts and then provide quick, actionable tips on how to follow the diet as part of a Nutritious Life. The Ketogenic Diet: What It Is The ketogenic diet is like Atkins amplified. Instead of just low-carb, it’s “almost no carb” and lots of fat. It’s been around for a long time but has recently gotten a lot of attention. Originally developed to treat children with epilepsy, the ketogenic diet restricts carb intake to as low as two to four percent of calories, with a 4:1 ratio of fat to carbs and protein combined. (For comparison, standard diets contain about 45 to 65 percent of calories from carbs; we generally recommend sticking to the lower end of that spectrum and avoiding refined carbs.) The goal of eating this way is to move the body into a state called ketosis. During ketosis, instead of breaking down carbs (there are none!) into glucose for fuel, the liver converts fat into ketone bodies, which become the body’s primary source of energy. Advocates s Continue reading >>

More in ketosis