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Ketosis When To Carb Up

The Other Side Of Keto Paleo: A Gut Healing Carbup

The Other Side Of Keto Paleo: A Gut Healing Carbup

What is a Carb-up, why and how to do it? WARNING: This is a carbohydrate containing recipe!! And YES intentionally so! And YES it fits in your Keto Paleo lifestyle, very much so! If you have never heard of a Carb-up or a carb night, you might be in for a nice surprise. Yes it is ok to have carbs on a Keto Paleo plan, if done the right way, with the right foods. It is actually a very beneficial practice. So what is a Carb-up in the first place? It is a meal containing a very small percentage of fat (about 1% to 5%) a moderate amount of protein(20% to 25%) and a certain quantity of carbs, calculated in base of your weight and how often you carb-up. Basically you are switching the quantity of fat for carbs in your plate when you carb-up. Why are carb-ups good and who are they for? Carb-ups are mostly beneficial for people who are very sick or have any kind of endocrine issues. A moderate amount of carbohydrates supports adrenal and thyroid function, specifically the conversion of thyroid hormone to the active form, it also stimulates Leptin production, helping you curb hunger and feel more satisfied after a meal. In healthy individuals carb-up stimulate muscle growth, when combined with resistance training. If you are having any sleep issues, hormonal issues, are very stressed or are a woman over 40, you might want to consider introducing some carb-ups to your Keto Paleo lifestyle. It will also make you less likely to cheat or binge, when you can indulge and expand your food range, without losing control of what you are doing. How do we do this carb-up thing? If you are a healthy individual you will want to use the carb-ups in conjunction with some sort of resistance training, to help you stay very lean and build muscle. In that case you would have your carb ups on workout Continue reading >>

Cyclical Ketogenic Diet Food List

Cyclical Ketogenic Diet Food List

This article gives you the cyclical ketogenic diet food list, including what to eat on low carb and high carb days. In case you don’t already know, the cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD) is a variation of the standard ketogenic diet (SKD) that includes periods of low carb periods, followed by 1-2 days of high carb refeeds. Here’s what a typical cyclical ketogenic diet schedule looks like: 5-6 days of low carb. 1-2 days of high carb The week’s menu is divided into two During low carb days, you eat the typical ketogenic macros – ultra-low carb, moderate protein and high fat. On refeed days you eat low fat, moderate protein, and high carb. The idea of carb cycling is to suppress the body’s insulin and blood sugar levels, which will increase fat burning and has other hormonal benefits. Depleting muscle glycogen initially and then refilling them with carbs has a supercompensatory effect, which increases amino acid synthesis and torches metabolic rate. Here I’ll give you the foods eaten during low carb days. These are all standard keto foods that keep insulin low and blood sugar stable. Keto Carbs – total macronutrient proportion <5-10%, in general, 20-50 grams NET a day Dark leafy green vegetables, such as spinach, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, asparagus, artichokes, Brussel sprouts, collard greens, More greens, like green beans, chard, celery, cucumber, lettuce, salad, zucchini, tomatoes, bell peppers, onions, garlic, squash, mushrooms Low carb berries, such as blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, currants, raspberries, rhubarb. Keto Protein – total macronutrient proportion 15-30%, in general, 0.7-1.2 grams/lb of lean body mass Fatty meat, such as pork chops, chicken with skin on, ground beef, game meat, bacon, sausages without wheat, organ meats, duc Continue reading >>

Video: Time To Carb-up? Signs To Watch For + Why I Do It.

Video: Time To Carb-up? Signs To Watch For + Why I Do It.

If there’s one thing I regret when I started eating high-fat, low-carb, keto, it’s that I waited way too long to do my first carb up. In all honesty? I got a little scared of eating carbs. I went months fighting the urge to eat a little bit of carrots, sweet potato or yam thinking that powering through would help me reach my goals quicker. Yah, it didn’t. If anything, it made things worse. I don’t want this guilt for you. So, I made this video. Today, we’re going through the 3 strategies for carb ups aka carb refeeds – why I (now) practice carb ups, how often to do them, why they work, and more. A must-watch if you’re using a ketogenic, high-fat eating style to heal your hormones, build muscle and/or reset your health. For video mini guide & transcript PDF, scroll down. Your Mini Guide & Transcript A 5-10 page PDF with the transcript for this video, resources, and exclusive steps to taking your keto fat burning to the next level. Download to your device and access anytime. Simply click the button above, enter your details, and the guide will be delivered to your inbox! Get the mini guide & transcript now. Highlights… Why I carb-up When to carb-up and how to do it The 3 different carb up and carb refeeding strategies to pick from Resources… Which of the 3 carb-up strategies have you done? What was your experience? Lets chat about it in the comments! Continue reading >>

When To Carb Up On A Ketogenic Diet

When To Carb Up On A Ketogenic Diet

If you’ve been doing the ketogenic diet for long, you may have heard the term “carb up” used. We are going to explain When to Carb Up on a Ketogenic Diet to help you make the most of your recent choice to live a healthier lifestyle and work toward losing weight. When to Carb Up on a Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is mostly a low-carb and high-protein dietary option. However, many individuals restrict carbohydrates strongly and use what they call a cyclic keto diet by using a few days on a regular basis to “carb up”. Below, I will explain more about the process, and some tips for when you should choose this method. Have you hit a plateau with weight loss? If you have been doing the ketogenic diet for a length of time, your body may be at a point where it just needs a change. That includes those who have lost a lot, but have just a few last pounds to reach their goal. A carb load can switch your body out of ketosis just long enough for the change back to ketosis to boost you back into loosing mode. Are you training regularly for building muscle? Many who are focused on building muscle find that doing a carb up day helps give them the extra boost of energy needed to really push to a goal. This is especially found with those who are preparing for a competition or a marathon of some sort. A carb up day allows them to add extra energy for 1-2 full days to get past that event. Most who do this follow a weekly regimen of ketogenic for a week, then follow that with 1-2 days of carb loading. They may limit this to once a month or do it routinely each week. However, they are using this as part of their high-intensity workout regimen. Do you have the discipline to go back on plan? If you don’t have the discipline to stop and go back on plan after 1-2 days, then this ma Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

Many Americans suffer from various chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet contains excessive amounts of protein and carbohydrates, neither of which is good for your health because it eventually causes you to develop insulin and leptin resistance. As a result, you gain excess weight, develop inflammation and become prone to cellular damage. To avoid this problem, significant changes in your diet are necessary, and the best way is inducing your body into a state of nutritional ketosis, a condition where your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar. In order to reach nutritional ketosis, you must follow a ketogenic diet. But what exactly is a ketogenic diet? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about a ketogenic diet – how you can apply it to your lifestyle and what positives you can reap from it. The Various Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a dietary approach that focuses on minimal carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and high healthy fat consumption — the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In fact, it’s what I recommend for most people who would like to optimize their health. There are many reasons why you should try a ketogenic diet. It can be very beneficial for people suffering from chronic conditions, or for people who would simply like to be healthier than their current state. You’ll be excited to know that a ketogenic diet can help with the following: • Weight loss If you’re trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet: A Low-carb Approach To Fat Loss

The Keto Diet: A Low-carb Approach To Fat Loss

Along with the Atkins diet and the South Beach diet, individuals who are interested in low carbohydrate approaches to dieting will likely want to look into the Keto Diet. Popular among many who are trying to maintain blood sugar levels and lose body fat, the main premise of this diet is, 'eat fat to lose fat'. So How Does It Work? The idea of the ketone diet is to get your body into a process called Ketosis where you stop burning carbohydrates as fuel and instead turn to the burning of what are known as ketones. This will occur when you bring your carbohydrate levels to around 50 grams per day or lower. Many keto activists advise that number to be 30 grams of carbohydrates but most individuals can still maintain ketosis while consuming the 50 grams and this allows for a little more leeway in the diet since you can increase the consumption of vegetables and a variety of flavoring's that contain a few grams of carbohydrates. TKD Or CKD Usually people who are involved with exercise will follow either a TKD (targeted keto diet) or a CKD (cyclical keto diet). TKD A TKD is one where you will eat carbohydrates right before and right after your workouts. This is the best bet for those who are involved in more intense activities and require some carbohydrates to fuel them and who are not as interested in doing carb loads and depletion workouts. CKD A CKD on the other hand is a diet where you will eat a minimum amount of carbohydrates per day (that 30-50 gram number) and then on the weekend (or at a time that is appropriate for you) do a large 'carb-up' phase where you will eat a large amount of carbohydrates in an effort to refill your muscle glycogen stores so you can continue to workout the coming week. Normally right before the carb-up phase you will do a depletion workout wh Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

Ketogenic Nutrition And Exercise: Carbs

In my previous post, How to Exercise on a Keto Diet, I outlined the some of the basic facts about exercise and the most common myths. In this and future posts, I'd like to focus on nutrition aspects of exercise. Foods containing carbs are not all evil and I'll explain when clean paleo-friendly carbs can be used even on a keto diet. Let's start by busting some of the most common myths... Carbs and Performance Do we need carbs for better performance? One of the most common myths is that low-carb eating will negatively affect your performance. This is down to studies that ignore keto-adaptation and only focus on the immediate effects of carb restriction. There is, indeed, a transitional period in which performance drop occurs but it only lasts for a few weeks. Once you get keto-adapted (usually 3-4 weeks), your body will switch from using glucose to using ketones and fatty acids as the main source of energy. This study performed on elite athletes shows that a keto diet does not affect strength performance. Eight athletes over a period of 30 days were fed virtually a zero carb diet and didn't experience any drop in performance. In fact, more and more studies are showing the beneficial effects of keto-adaptation. Even athletes that are doing very long cardio training or marathons can follow a keto diet. Timothy Allen Olson is just one of the many super athletes who have proven to be thriving almost purely on a diet that is best described as low-carb, keto and paleo. However, Timothy doesn't follow a standard ketogenic diet - he eats carbs strategically. Before or after his workouts he eats clean carbs such as sweet potatoes and fruits. He also uses glucose gels on training runs. Everyone is different and although some may thrive on a Standard Ketogenic Diet, others may benef Continue reading >>

Low Carb Dieting Myths

Low Carb Dieting Myths

The myths about low carb dieting and specifically ketogenic diets abound in the American collective consciousness. These are just a few of the most pervasive myths I've encountered, with explanations as to why they are incorrect and simply don't make sense, scientifically: Myth 1: Carbs are an essential nutrient for good health. Some nutrition professionals still believe that carbohydrates are necessary to provide glucose to fuel the brain and avoid hypoglycemia. It's an old way of thinking, and it's just not true scientifically. Essential nutrients are nutrients which your body cannot make, so they have to be obtained on a daily basis from your food sources. There are essential proteins, and essential fatty acids, but there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate. When the body is in ketosis, it has a “glucose sparing” effect. First, the skeletal muscles burn fatty acids preferentially which spares glucose for the brain to use. Second, once a person is keto-adapted, the brain switches to using ketone bodies for over half of the fuel it needs, and less glucose is needed since ketone bodies are being used as an alternative fuel. This small amount of carbohydrate (glucose or blood sugar) needed to fuel the brain during keto adaptation can be generated internally. Your liver can make all the glucose needed for brain function from glycogen stored in the liver. And if need be, the body can also make glucose from the protein in your food. Hence, carbohydrates are NOT essential nutrients, and many people, such as the Inuit of Alaska and the Masai of Africa live without them for long periods of time without any effect on health and well-being. The “brain needs carbs” idea is only true if you consistently eat a high carb diet (as most registered dietitians will tel Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs Keto: Why Ketosis Is Different From A Low Carb Diet

Low Carb Vs Keto: Why Ketosis Is Different From A Low Carb Diet

Are you making a critical mistake when it comes to ketosis? I’ve been extremely guilty of it in the past. One of the biggest mistakes for people trying to improve their health is the misconception that a low carbohydrate diet equals a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case and could be killing your efforts to get all of the health benefits you are looking for. There are some critical differences in what people think a “low-carb high-fat” (LCHF) diet is and what a ketogenic diet is. High carb doesn’t mean diabetic. Just like low carb doesn’t mean ketogenic. If you’re not super down with what ketosis is, it is simply a metabolic state of using fats for energy. This provides a lot of benefits that we can get into later, but long story short, there are numerous benefits that you’re going to be missing out on if you are simply “low-carb” and not definitively in ketosis. Your low carb diet can actually be pretty brutal if it is not a ketogenic diet. As evidence, this is a maddening conversation that bubbles up more and more as I won’t shut up about ketogenic diets: Person: “Yeah, I tried ketosis and it sucked, I felt awful. Doesn’t work for me.” Me: “Hmm, that’s weird, did you check your ketone levels?” Person: “No. But, I was low carb. Ketosis isn’t for me. It sucks.” Me: “Well… low carb doesn’t mean you’re burning fats and utilizing ketones, so your body was still probably trying to use carbs as fuel, but you didn’t have enough around eating low carb, which is why it sucked.” Person: “I’m not tracking. Ketosis sucks. And so do you.” This person was low-carb, not keto. There is a huge difference. By why? Time for some definitions: Low-carb: Eating an arbitrarily “low” number of carbohydrates, or just a Continue reading >>

All About Keto Carb Ups And Cyclical Ketosis

All About Keto Carb Ups And Cyclical Ketosis

Lots of cyclical ketogenic resources to help show you how to do a keto carb up, why it may be a game changer, and take your keto awesomeness to the next level! Carbs are not all bad (*gasp*). However, eating too many carbs can cause a plethora of problems, from blood sugar spikes to digestion problems. You probably already know this… and you know it’s not fun. Carb ups (also known as cyclical ketosis), a strategy one can practice on a ketogenic diet, are when you eat more carbs, on a ketogenic diet. And, there are specific strategies to doing this right while doing keto. By adding a carb up practice to your keto diet, you have the potential to encourage your body to heal, overcome plateaus, balance hormones, and more. To show you why you want to carb up, and how to do it, I’ve put together a bunch of resources to help guide you through carbing up while still rockin’ it at keto! In these resources you’ll find lots of helpful info on: What a carb up is When you should carb up How many carbs are in a keto carb up Examples of keto carb ups and cyclical ketosis Keto meal plans with a cyclical ketogenic practice Good carb up recipes PODCAST: KETO CARB UPS 101 Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes Okay, let’s start with the basics of carbing up with keto. The hardest part is usually just figuring out how to get started. Once you get past that, you’re golden. Everyone is different so it’s good to arm yourself with enough information to know if carbing up on a keto diet is something that’s right for you. Highlights… What a carb up is Your body during and after a carb up How to know if carb ups are right for you VIDEO: TIME TO CARB UP? SIGNS TO WATCH FOR + HOW TO DO IT Plateauing with weight loss on keto? Need to balance out your hormones? There are several signs Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

Carb Ups On Keto Diet (cyclical Ketosis)

Carb Ups On Keto Diet (cyclical Ketosis)

If you have already mastered the standard ketogenic diet, have a solid workout routine and would like to mix things up a little, you might want to consider starting to do carb ups, or a cyclical ketogenic diet. A carb up (also called “carb loading” or “carb refeeding”) is a period of time, usually 1 day (but it could be as short as 1 meal or as long as 2 days) where you’re intentionally consuming more carbs than usual. Yes, this will kick you out of ketosis and this is the purpose – find out why below. Warning: carb up practice is NOT for everyone. You need to understand your body and your goal first. If you’re a beginner, this is absolutely NOT recommended. Why do carb ups on a Keto Diet? Carb ups can serve a few purposes: break a weight loss stall, improving hormonal balance, enhancing muscle growth, increases energy expenditure and leptin concentration (1). To get the full benefits of a carb refeed, you need to do it in a controlled manner, in order to make sure that you get back to keto right after that, and that your carb up weekend does not turn into a carb up week or month. Things to consider before doing a carb up You should consider doing carb ups on a keto diet only once your body has adapted to burning fat as its primary fuel source, which for most people comes after at least 4-6 weeks into their new ketogenic way of eating. Related: 5 Signs You Are Fat Adapted If you start doing carb ups earlier, you risk getting keto flu all over again, and your body will need to restart the fat adaptation process, which can be a generally unpleasant (and unnecessary) experience. Carb ups might awaken your carb cravings, so you need to be extra careful if you’re prone to having strong cravings in the first place. In order to keep those at bay in the days aft Continue reading >>

Advanced Ketogenic Dieting

Advanced Ketogenic Dieting

There is a lot of confusion out there when it comes to ketogenic dieting. All around us we have hundreds of books, so many experts, endless opinions from people who have done it themselves and posted their views online. Right now the water is exceedingly muddied. The goal of this article it to not only give a clear view on the keto protocols but also lay out an sound tried and true protocol along with a systematic way to set it up. Ketogenic Dieting Defined Lets start this off talking about what ketogenic dieting means and doesn’t mean. A lot of people think that keto means eating low carbs. Some people think it means just eating protein. Ketogenic dieting is achieved by getting into ketosis, and that is a process that the body has to go through. Eating low carbs or only eating protein, etc, doesn’t mean the body will get into ketosis. Generally speaking being keto means that someone has limited their carbohydrate intake to extremely low levels until their body runs out of stored glycogen causing the body to start making ketones (fats) to run on. THAT is what the main goal of a ketogenic diet is- being in ketosis and a state of using fat for fuel. We all have glycogen (carbs) stored in our liver, and when we limit carb consumption our liver kicks out stored glycogen to fuel our activity. When that liver glycogen runs out that is when the body flips the switch and starts making ketones for us to use as energy. Ketones are fractionated fats that yield 7 cals per gram (regular fats yield 9 calories per gram when used for energy). This is very interesting because when we are eating a carb based diet, carbs give us 4 calories per carb eaten to burn for energy. Being in a ketogenic state we are burning 7 calories per ketone….meaning we are burning more energy at rest. I Continue reading >>

Not Losing Weight On Low Carb? Try Carb Cycling.

Not Losing Weight On Low Carb? Try Carb Cycling.

Carbohydrates are just as addictive as nicotine, if not more. The first time I quit smoking after fourteen years, I quit it for two years. Then one night at a party I was offered a cigarette by someone I hadn’t seen for a while and I, figuring I was “cured,” lit it up. The next day I bought a pack and jumped right back into smoking a pack a day for three more years before I finally quit again (2.5 years now!) When it comes to carbohydrates, I don’t see a difference. Last year on my birthday, after doing keto for a solid six or seven months, my wonderful fiance got me a doughnut cake as a cheat day treat. A doughnut, the size of a cake. I figured hey, it’s one day, one doughnut. But it wasn’t. The minute carbohydrates were back in my system it was as if they were never gone. And suddenly we were ordering Dominos and drinking Coca-Cola. And again. And again. In fact, I never ate pizza regularly or drank soda until that moment. It’s like one big doughnut was a gateway drug to everything bad, even things I didn’t eat before. Eight months and 20lbs later we were able to get the will power together to quit them again. Losing Weight on a Low Carb Diet If you’re on a low carb diet, you don’t need me to tell you the benefits. Some do it for weight loss, others for mental clarity, and others for illnesses like cancer and alzheimers. But remember, quitting carbs doesn’t mean quitting real food. Every day I eat grass-fed meat, organic greens like spinach, and even berries. If you choose to drink diet coke and processed things loaded with fake sugars, with a block of cheese for lunch, you’re not making yourself healthier, you might even be damaging your body rather than helping it. One thing I’ve learned from quitting carbohydrates and then falling off the Continue reading >>

5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Going Keto

5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Going Keto

You will ask yourself “can everyone smell my breath or is it just me?” My husband Declan and I are currently eating keto. Why? Well keto is the new black. Everyone’s talking keto and what better way to test out the new craze then to embark on the keto way of living. So we set ourselves an eight week experiment to lower our carbs, increase our good fat and get our bodies in to ketosis. Here are the five thoughts that run through your head. 1. You can survive without your beloved carbs but it will be brutal At first I was afraid, I was petrified! Carbs and I go way back. So removing them was not easy! And what happens when you remove carbs? The Carb Flu – when your body starts to freak out on you. You see, when you eat carbs your body turns those carbs in to glucose and that’s what your body uses as its primary source of energy. When you take that glucose away by decreasing the amount of carbs you eat, your body needs to look for something else to use for energy. So it turns to your fat stores. And that’s exactly what we want on our keto journey. This metabolic state is called Ketosis. I’m not going to lie to you, the first two weeks of eating keto are brutal and your body doesn’t go down without a fight during this transition. You feel lethargic, a little cranky and generally hangry and you will think to yourself surely one or two Oreos won’t hurt? But Carb Flu is exactly what you want. It means you are transitioning to using those fat stores for energy. The Carb Flu is short lived, maybe for a few days and then once you transition in to ketosis. 2. Your breath will smell – like really bad Lucky for me I’ve been waking up next to the same person for eight years, and Declan my husband is also going keto too. So while we knew we both had horrible morn Continue reading >>

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