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Ketosis When Sick

Being Sick While In Ketosis.

Being Sick While In Ketosis.

Despite all my efforts to the contrary....daily Zyrtec, Flonase, prayer and spiritual dances; I have fallen prey to the same October sinus infection that I've gotten each year since I moved to Houston. Usually, if I'm dieting, a sickness means the diet is off. Always, if I'm low carb dieting, a sickness means the diet is off. I'm free to slurp down as much Chicken Noodle Soup as I can stand, coupled with ginger ale, candy, and crackers---the mainstay of my "sick diet" since I can remember. But this time I want to remain in ketosis. I don't want to lose my hard earned work of muscle building since I started working with Yvette, my personal trainer, in July. That means I've got to get enough protein that my body doesn't start eating my own muscles to give my brain the glucose it requires. I managed to start the day off right thanks to the love of my life: bacon and eggs cooked in bacon grease. Halfway through I complained, as usual, that it was too many eggs (3.5 apiece) and got ordered, as usual, to finish it all. I'm glad, as usual, that I did. I had a salad for lunch...romaine lettuce, parmesan cheese, a few bits of grilled chicken and my homemade blue cheese dressing. That was around 11:30. At 12:40 the school nurse took my temp: 99.3---not bad, really, but she laughed and said it would be higher by the time I got home. Thanks, nurse! That was just the encouragement I needed. She was right. I was having chills on the drive home and got straight in the bed at 3:44. No appetite. Now for me, ketosis itself is a huge appetite suppressant, its the biological weapon I need to use if I'm going to lose 240 220lbs and keep it off. That coupled with a fever, which is also a natural appetite suppressant could be troublesome if indeed I am to get anywhere near the 161 grams of pr Continue reading >>

Trying The Keto Diet And Feeling Sick

Trying The Keto Diet And Feeling Sick

Some women have been trying Keto frantically before the holidays. Many want to drop some weight so they can afford a few days of the additional holiday carbs and some are planning to do a strict Keto Diet even after the holidays. Well ladies, it is time to learn a bit or two about keto so you do not crash and burn when you do it. Many women are emailing me already saying, “I am trying to do the Keto diet and feeling sick. Why is this?” or “I can’t stay Keto as I am feeling so ill.” Well my friends, you have made a drastic change in lowering your carbs and upping your “hopefully” beneficial healthy fats and your body is essentially going through a big change; and I mean a BIG change especially if you have been living a high carb diet. Keep in mind even if you have not been eating candy bars or lots of fruit, those nibbles of snacks throughout the day, bread here and there or those “few” French fries will keep the blood sugar elevated. If you are a mom or busy executive on the run, those quick snacks to keep going just add up! You also may be finally realizing just how many carbs you have been eating at this crucial point in the switching over, especially if you are reading labels or using a carb or keto calculator. Let’s dive in and talk the talk. By the way, if you love protein ideas you can find oodles of Paleo, low carb, keto approved friendly recipes throughout my recipe pages. Just choose your category and have fun. With lowering carbs drastically or going keto you may experience or be experiencing some nausea, headaches or irritability or feel like a cold is coming on with some sniffles or a cough. This is not all that uncommon and it will pass. This is definitely not the time to give in. If you did not read up on keto or this “keto game”, y Continue reading >>

Related Activities This

Related Activities This

KETO NEWS Focus on non-food holiday season. Crafts such as ornament decorating or candle making can help spread holiday cheer. Check out Glow Stick Bowling submitted by one of our keto families. In This Issue  Holiday Tips  Holiday Recipes  Sick Day Management  Keto In the News  Clinic Updates  Community Events Healthy fat sources are key to a successful ketogenic diet Holiday Planning The holiday season is here again! Whether you’re a ketogenic holiday expert, or a newcomer, we hope this newsletter provides helpful ideas and tips. Holidays typically include celebrations, and food tends to be the main focal point; either by family tradition or religious affiliations. While it is important to include holiday spirit into keto meals/snacks, keep in mind that there are non-food related holiday tradition’s as well. Although it is difficult to accommodate a ketogenic diet during the holidays, it is not impossible! Tips to Ease Holiday Stress  Talk to your dietitian for any recipes that you may need well before the time you need them.  Make the recipes in advance to ensure that they taste good and travel well.  For holiday events find out what will be served ahead of time so that you can find keto-variations to match what everyone else will be eating.  Make a few batches of keto treats to have handy over the holidays so that you can provide them for your child at school parties and/or family get-togethers when other kids are enjoying treats. Holiday Keto Blogs Tips for Managing Your Child’s Ketogenic Diet Over the Holidays A Keto Mom’s Tips for Managing the Holidays on the Ketogenic Diet Medical University of South Carolina Fall Edition 2016 Featured Recipe: Pumpkin Spiced Trifle Continue reading >>

Sick Day Management Using Blood 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-ohb) Compared With Urine Ketone Monitoring Reduces Hospital Visits In Young People With T1dm: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Sick Day Management Using Blood 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-ohb) Compared With Urine Ketone Monitoring Reduces Hospital Visits In Young People With T1dm: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Abstract AIMS: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening acute complication of Type 1 diabetes, may be preventable with frequent monitoring of glycaemia and ketosis along with timely supplemental insulin. This prospective, two-centre study assessed sick day management using blood 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-OHB) monitoring compared with traditional urine ketone testing, aimed at averting emergency assessment and hospitalization. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-three children, adolescents and young adults, aged 3-22 years, and their families received sick day education. Participants were randomized to receive either a blood glucose monitor that also measures blood 3-OHB (blood ketone group, n = 62) or a monitor plus urine ketone strips (urine ketone group, n = 61). All were encouraged to check glucose levels > or = 3 times daily and to check ketones during acute illness or stress, when glucose levels were consistently elevated (> or = 13.9 mmol/l on two consecutive readings), or when symptoms of DKA were present. Frequency of sick days, hyperglycaemia, ketosis, and hospitalization/emergency assessment were ascertained prospectively for 6 months. RESULTS: There were 578 sick days during 21,548 days of follow-up. Participants in the blood ketone group checked ketones significantly more during sick days (276 of 304 episodes, 90.8%) than participants in the urine ketone group (168 of 274 episodes, 61.3%) (P < 0.001). The incidence of hospitalization/emergency assessment was significantly lower in the blood ketone group (38/100 patient-years) compared with the urine ketone group (75/100 patient-years) (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Blood ketone monitoring during sick days appears acceptable to and preferred by young people with Type 1 diabetes. Routine implementation of blood 3-OHB Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 3—being Sick On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 3—being Sick On A Ketogenic Diet

The good, the bad, and the confusing…I am fascinated by this experience and I love this diet, but it continues to leave me with more questions than answers. This week, my biggest challenge was being sick on a ketogenic diet and the associated struggles with maintaining ketosis and energy. Note: this post was originally published on Aug 1, 2013. It was edited to streamline content and improve graphics, then re-posted in June 2016, therefore some older comments may pertain to content that was removed during revision. This post is part of a series describing my attempt to follow Dr. Seyfried’s dietary recommendations for cancer. To start at the beginning, please go to the first post: Seyfried’s Ketogenic Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-Start to Ketosis. Notes: Sleep was terrible—slept for 3 hours then wide awake from 1:30 am to 5:00 am, then back to sleep, slept through the alarm. Woke up with mild headache and dry eyes, and felt slightly bloated. Mild cough and sore throat. Not hungry at all in the morning. Day 16 (2/15/13) Notes: Mild headache and dry eyes in the morning. Slightly bloated. Cold symptoms continue. Appetite was nice and low and I was able to work a very full and busy day without any problems other than feeling a little irritable. Sleep horrendous again. Day 17 (2/16/13) Notes: A bit hungry in the morning (stomach growly, slightly lightheaded). Cold symptoms worsening. No dry eyes (no olives yesterday). One hour after eating leg of duck I felt sleepy and achey. I wonder if the meat wasn’t fresh enough (it was one of those vacuum-packed meats with a longer shelf life) or if the protein grams were too many too eat all at once? I checked my blood sugar out of curiosity and it was 84. I napped for 90 minutes. I avoided olives, vinaigrette, bacon, and avo Continue reading >>

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

Why Ketones (and Ketosis) Can Cause Stomach Pain

This is not a “feel-good” post. We are going to talk about some of the not-so-pleasant side effects of transitioning into ketosis, especially looking at why ketones (and transitioning to ketosis, in general) can cause stomach pain. We will also talk about what you can do to solve the issues. Some are practical solutions; others have to do with summoning the mental strength to just deal with a little discomfort to get the rewards and results you want. If Captain Jack Sparrow were doing the ketogenic diet, he would probably say. “The stomach pain is not the problem… it’s your attitude about the stomach pain which is the problem.” I’ve been there too. The first time I ever tried exogenous ketones, I was about 16 hours removed from carbohydrates (In-N-Out burger) and I was feeling awful. I thought Perfect Keto would make it all better. I took a heaping scoop of Peaches and Cream and waited 30 minutes. The results? Significant stomach issues, to put it kindly. I thought surely these ketones are bad and I quit my attempt to “go keto” on the spot. Why Ketosis Causes Stomach Pain The short answer is dehydration. The process of keto-adaptation is going to dehydrate us. Remember that one purpose of taking exogenous ketones is to speed up keto-adaptation. This means taking ketones will also speed up the side-effects of keto-adaptation. Why Does Ketosis Dehydrate? Transitioning to keto means we are moving from using glycogen and carbs to using fat and ketones. There are two reasons this dehydrates us. 1) One of the main inefficiencies with glycogen and carbs is that it must be stored with water. It takes 4 grams of water to store a gram of glycogen.[1] As you run through your glycogen you will lose tons of water (not literally tons but you get the point). 2) High Continue reading >>

Yoyo Ketosis And Bad Feelings?

Yoyo Ketosis And Bad Feelings?

I think it's probable that dipping in and out of (deep) ketosis is suboptimal. Stephan Phinney, whose research focuses on ketogenic diets, says adaptation to deep ketosis can take three weeks or longer: The most obvious of these is the time allotted (or not) for keto-adaptation. In this context, the prescient observation of Schwatka (that adaptation to "a diet of reindeer meat" takes 2???3 weeks) says it all. None of the comparative low-carbohydrate versus high-carbohydrate studies done in support of the carbohydrate loading hypothesis sustained the low carbohydrate diet for more than 2 weeks [5], and most (including the classic report of Christensen and Hansen [2]) maintained their low-carbohydrate diets for 7 days or less. There are to date no studies that carefully examine the optimum length of this keto-adapataion period, but it is clearly longer than one week and likely well advanced within 3???4 weeks. The process does not appear to happen any faster in highly trained athletes than in overweight or untrained individuals. This adaptation process also appears to require consistent adherence to carbohydrate restriction, as people who intermittently consume carbohydrates while attempting a ketogenic diet report subjectively reduced exercise tolerance. He and his co-author Volek offer a little more detail regarding why that might be in their new book, The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Living: Within a few days of starting on carbohydrate restriction, most people begin excreting ketones in their urine. This occurs before serum [blood] ketones have risen to their stable adapted level because un-adapted renal tubules actively secrete beta-hyroxybutyrate and acetoacetate [two forms of ketones] into the urine. This is the same pathway that clears other organic acids l Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

What Is Keto Flu ?

What Is Keto Flu ?

So What is Keto Flu Anyways!? I posted this What is Keto Flu article below back in the summer of 2013 when I had no idea what I was doing or what keto flu was. All I knew is that I was sick as a dog! I’ve learned so much since then and so many people manage to find this article, so I thought I should update it with the solutions that work! The Keto flu is also called Ketosis Flu, Ketogenic Flu, Induction Flu and Carb Flu depending on what groups you hang out in. It normally is what happens after your first couple of days without carbs. Not to every single person, but most people go through some sort of carb withdrawal and/or carb detox. What actually causes the Keto Flu Symptoms? Keto flu happens when our bodies shift from glucose or sugar burning mode to fat burning mode. It is basically an electrolyte imbalance. On a keto diet we need more magnesium, potassium and sodium. Luckily, this is a pretty easy problem to solve and I wish I had known about this 3 years ago! Can You Stop Keto Flu ? You know, for some of us, the keto flu is something we just have to go through for a few days. Think of it as a detox because bottom line, that is what is happening. You are detoxing from sugar, carbs, wheat, all those things that are holding you back from optimal health. But even though you likely can’t stop keto flu, you sure can minimize the symptoms! Drink lots of salty chicken broth. Use a magnesium supplement. You will be amazed at how helpful this will be! I recommend using Lo Salt or any similar blend that has potassium and sodium. My other go to remedy is a nightly drink of Calm. This is a magnesium drink that I swear by and I still use it almost every night. Not only does Calm prevent leg cramps but it also keeps me regular, which can be an issue for low carbers. It is Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

High Protein Diets

High Protein Diets

High-protein Diets: Trading Your Health for Temporary Weight Loss Once again, medical doctors and the paperback book industry advocating high-protein and fat- laden diets are grabbing the attention of millions of desperate people. “Lose 20 pounds in 30 days!” “Eat all the bacon you want and be thin as a breadstick!” The truth about these types of fad “diets” is that people can temporarily lose large amounts of weight, and can even lower their blood cholesterol, sugar, and triglycerides — but the method is unhealthful. The only study published on the most popular high-protein diet, Dr. Atkin’s diet, shows the cholesterol goes up and LDL “bad” cholesterol goes up significantly, and HDL “good” cholesterol goes down significantly in women. Free fatty acids levels, which when elevated are associated with heart arrhythmias, are doubled. (J Am Diet Assoc 77:264 – 270, 1980). Hyperinsulinism and Insulin Resistance Advocates of high-protein diets explain the reason people are fat is not because of the fat they eat, but because of hyperinsulinism and insulin resistance. Insulin, the major regulator of fuel storage and release, is synthesized by the pancreas and secreted into the blood stream after we eat. Insulin stimulates the synthesis of fat, proteins, and glycogen (the storage form for sugars). It encourages fat cells to store fat and prevents the release of fat from these cells. Therefore, high levels of insulin, known as hyperinsulinism, would be expected to promote obesity. Eating simple sugars (including too much fruit), flours, and drinking alcohol stimulate insulin production and release. Eating all kinds of fat raises insulin levels (Diabetes Care 16:1459, 1993; Am J Clin Nutr 73:878, 2001). Exercise, eating whole grains, and small frequent me Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Remedies For Keto Flu Sore Throat

Remedies For Keto Flu Sore Throat

My throat started hurting a couple days ago. Until today, I considered a sore throat as a sign of success. I’ve gone through keto induction four times. Every single time I’ve gotten a rotten, awful sore throat. It’s pretty much like, “oh! my throat hurts! must be in ketosis!” Pee on a keto stick. Confirmed. But it still hurts like hell, and today I connected the dots and realized that it’s a symptom of a bigger keto problem. Searching through the internets will give you a bunch of people who will ask “does keto give you a sore throar?” Followed by a bunch of keto-ers and low-carbers who will tell you going on keto won’t give you a sore throat, and neither will keto flu. I can’t blame them, they’re just speaking from their personal experience. But they’re a little wrong, and that’s the puzzle piece I figured out today. A keto diet naturally lowers your pH, which can do a whole host of bad things to your body. Last year I went to a natural health clinic where they tested my blood and pH. This was about a month after being in ketosis. One major red flag that came up was my pH. My pH was around 6 when it’s supposed to be between 6.4 and 7.4, ideally closer to the 7.4. In fact, they say Cancer dies at a pH of 8. A pH of 6 might not look far off, but it is. A reading of 5.5 is acidosis. Guess what one of the side effects of having a pH around 6? Oh you know, just a SORE THROAT, amongst lots of other issues, like being a magnet for infection and sickness. Did you know that when your pH is low, you also absorb 20% less oxygen, too? So regardless of whether your sore throat comes from your low pH balance directly, or because you got sick based on your low pH balance – this is something to watch. It’s not healthy, in fact I think eating bread and s Continue reading >>

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