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Ketosis When Dying

Adenohypophyseal Changes In Patients Dying Of Acute Renal Tubular Necrosis ‡

Adenohypophyseal Changes In Patients Dying Of Acute Renal Tubular Necrosis ‡

Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (1.5M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References. These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Articles from The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine are provided here courtesy of Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Continue reading >>

Last Hours Of Living

Last Hours Of Living

Dying patient Last hours of live Transitioning Once transitioning process started, discuss the goals of care with family (may be patient if he is able to) Several patho-physiological changes occur as patient is transitioning Patient develops multiple signs & symptoms as they are getting closer to death The S/S are devastating to patients and staff & friends & family. Control each symptom effectively, May require contineous care, family / friends needs access to patients 24/7 Aggressive resuscitative measure are fruitless The degree of family distress seems to be inversely related to the extent to which advance planning & preparation occurred. Spending time in preparation of families is very worthwhile Physicians, nurses & hospice staff need to have a clear understanding of: signs & symptoms pathophysiology pharmacological / non-pharmacological approach changes encountered surrounding the dying process : Decreasing Appetite/Food Intake, Wasting, Decreasing Blood Perfusion, Renal Failure, Decreasing Level of Consciousness , Terminal Delirium, Loss of Ability to Swallow,Pain, declining in all aspects of life Weakness/Fatigue : functional decline Decreasing Fluid Intake, Dehydration Neurological Dysfunction: An Overview Loss of Sphincter Control Changes in Respiration Loss of Ability to Close Eyes Manage other s/s Most common S/S are: functional decline, dependent on all ADLs, anxiety, dyspnea, delirium, death rattle, nausea, worsening of discomfort / pain. Place of death: * 59-81% wants to die at home. * 20% of dying patients are having rough time due to transition between hospital / home/ nursing home/ assisted living facilities. *Recognize transitioning and help them die peacefully at home *45% of deaths occur under hospice care in USA * Place of death of hospice patient Continue reading >>

Cancer’s Ketogenic Kryptonite With Patricia Daly – #339

Cancer’s Ketogenic Kryptonite With Patricia Daly – #339

Why you should listen – Patricia Daly is a fully-qualified nutritional therapist based in Dublin, Ireland. Following her cancer diagnosis, she left her corporate career and started studying nutrition, specializing in the area of Integrative Cancer Care. As a Swiss native, she regularly attends training courses in Switzerland/Germany, including at the renowned Tumor Biology Center in Freiburg, Germany. She’s working on a new book on the benefits of the low carb and ketogenic diet, which she’s co-writing with Irish foodwriter Domini Kemp. On today’s episode of Bulletproof Radio, Patricia and Dave talk about the ketogenic diet, tips for battling cancer, lights to avoid, hormonal irregularities, grounding, her story of overcoming cancer and more. Enjoy the show! Watch Listen Follow Along with the Transcript! Dave: Looking for a career in tech, maybe business data design or marketing? Trying to get that promotion or raise to excel in your career? You need 21st century training and skills. General Assembly is the largest and most respected school worldwide for people seeking to grow their talents and master the marketplace. Whether it’s learning remotely online or in person at one of their beautiful campuses, you can join the 350,000 people who had already gone the training needed to propel careers in tech and business. More than 2500 companies worldwide hire GAs graduates with 99% of graduates who participate in GA’s career services lending a new role in their field within 6 months of starting their job search. Take control of your talent and career now. Find out more at ga.co/bullet that’s ga.co/bullet. Enter the promo code bullet to save on your first class workshop or event. That’s ga.co/bullet code word bullet. Speaker 1: Bulletproof Radio a station of hi Continue reading >>

Symptom Relief For The Dying Patient

Symptom Relief For The Dying Patient

Physical, psychologic, emotional, and spiritual distress is common among patients living with fatal illness, and patients commonly fear protracted and unrelieved suffering. Health care providers can reassure patients that distressing symptoms can often be anticipated and prevented and, when present, can be treated. Symptom treatment should be based on etiology when possible. For example, vomiting due to hypercalcemia requires different treatment from that due to elevated intracranial pressure. However, diagnosing the cause of a symptom may be inappropriate if testing is burdensome or risky or if specific treatment (eg, major surgery) has already been ruled out. For dying patients, comfort measures, including nonspecific treatment or a short sequential trial of empiric treatments, often serve patients better than an exhaustive diagnostic evaluation. Because one symptom can have many causes and may respond differently to treatment as the patient’s condition deteriorates, the clinical team must monitor and reevaluate the situation frequently. Drug overdosage or underdosage is harmful, and both become more likely as worsening physiology causes changes in drug metabolism and clearance. When survival is likely to be brief, symptom severity frequently dictates initial treatment. About half of patients dying of cancer have severe pain. Yet, only half of these patients receive reliable pain relief. Many patients dying of organ system failure and dementia also have severe pain. Sometimes pain can be controlled but persists because patients, family members, and physicians have misconceptions about pain and the drugs (especially opioids) that can relieve it, resulting in serious and persistent underdosing. Patients perceive pain differently, depending partly on whether other fact Continue reading >>

Why Your Diet Should Include More Fat

Why Your Diet Should Include More Fat

Think back to the '80s and '90s when buying anything that didn't don a low-fat label was simply taboo. Back then, butter and egg yolks topped the "do not eat" list, while refined carbs and packaged foods weren't given a second thought. But times have definitely changed. These days, experts tout fat as a must-have macro and full-fat products, like whole milk, avocado, ghee and coconut oil, join the ranks of superfoods. Yet, some people still question what kinds of fat they should eat and exactly how it affects the body. That's why we called on Mark Hyman, MD, author of the "Eat Fat, Get Thin Cookbook," to help us wipe clean the greasy mess of info and lay down the facts on fat. Reality: Even though this myth is the basis for low-fat diets and food products, it's far from the truth. Eating fat won't make you fat. Completely eliminating or limiting fat from your diet can actually make you gain weight, often because it leaves you feeling so deprived. Conversely, some studies have found that fatty foods can aid in weight loss. "The problem with most diets is that they lack the key ingredient that makes food taste good and cuts your hunger," says Dr. Hyman. And you guessed it, that's fat. "Healthy fats are the best source of energy for your body, and they keep your metabolism and fat-burning mechanisms running as they're meant to," Dr. Hyman explains. Research supports this, showing that a low-fat diet could slow down metabolism. So now you have permission to enjoy a spoonful of nut butter with an apple before your next workout or a satiating piece of steak for dinner every once in a while. Reality: Not so fast. While saturated fat has long been known as public health enemy number one, recent research proves it's not so scary. Of course, you shouldn't always opt for a meal fu Continue reading >>

Carb-loaded - A Culture Dying To Eat

Carb-loaded - A Culture Dying To Eat

Carb-Loaded: A Culture Dying to Eat is a chronicle of the things it's writer and director Lathe Poland learned after he was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. He sought to find out why he got sick, because he didn't fit the classic picture of an adult onset diabetes sufferer. He quickly learned that much of what he knew about healthy eating was based on myths or fifty year old science. In the film he searches out why Americas modern food culture is killing us. The upside? There is a lot that can be done! Continue reading >>

How Do I Survive Low-carbs & High Protein? Feel Like I'm Dying...

How Do I Survive Low-carbs & High Protein? Feel Like I'm Dying...

Hi guys, I'd love your help. I'm on day 12 of Paleo, and I went from a pasta-heavy (though pretty healthy)diet onto full Paleo because I needed to lose weight. Day 4 I could hardly walk and I had t cancel meetings and go back to bed. Then I felt a bit better. Day 7 I had to go back to bed again. I had zero energy and couldn't even walk up the stairs in my house without collapsing into bed. I haven't ever felt hungry on the diet (which is a Paleo miracle that I absolutely love), but I've felt like my body was cannibalising itself. In general I'm fairly sensible, and feel that maybe I've gone a bit OTT by going to such a protein-heavy diet (from about 15% to 50%). I'm very active and have to cycle to work and back, about 15 km (the reason i went Paleo was because I couldn't believe I was doing that much exercise, not eating more than I usually do, and yet not losing weight). But I'm so tired on the diet (I can literally feel my muscles searching for energy that isn't there), that I'm worried a) I can't keep up my active lifestyle and b) maybe I'm actually doing something really dangerous to my body. I went on the Internet and read all about ketosis - which made me feel better because I decided I wasn't actually dying - but my good friend who is a distinguished doctor is begging me to stop the diet because he says over-eating protein can lead to devastating other illnesses, and in extreme cases, can even kill you. Any thoughts? And if I wanted to increase my carbs a bit (just because my body seems to need the energy to function), any suggestions? My average diet is: Breakfast: an avocado, fruit (strawberries, blueberries, grapes, banana), almond and walnuts. Or 3 times a week I have scrambled eggs or an omelette. Lunch: salmon sashimi, or grilled chicken with big salad Sna Continue reading >>

Keto To Stay Alive With Cancer

Keto To Stay Alive With Cancer

Yes, the title of this blog entry is provocative, it is provocative for a reason. I am tired of hearing about cancer patients dying because they were told there was nothing they could do, or they agreed to the standard treatment even if that treatment didn’t have good statistics associated with it. It is important to understand how cancer cells proliferate in order to understand why something so simple as staying on a ketogenic diet can keep cancer at bay. All cells require fuel to produce ATP for energy and proliferation. Under a normal western modern-day diet, that fuel is glucose. Under conditions of extremely low carbohydrate and moderate protein intake, that fuel is fat. All cells but cancer cells can utilize ketone bodies (specific fats) as their fuel source. Cancer cells require 19 times the amount of glucose as a normal cell for their ATP production. They can only use this one pathway to fuel production. When serum glucose levels drop below 80, cancer cells start having difficulty staying alive, let alone dividing. In instances of low fat and high carb dieting, when someone misses a meal, they often feel weak and dizzy. But when eating a high fat diet with very low carbs, that bad feeling is not there, even when missing a meal. It’s not there because their brain is happy with ample fuel for activity. That fuel is fat. Almost all of my cancer patients come to me thinking they haven’t been eating too many carbs, but almost all of them have signs of insulin resistance, including higher than normal fasting glucose levels and difficulty bringing their serum glucose levels below 80 on the “induction” phase of the keto diet. Until very recently, American institutions had not been looking at ketogenic dieting as a way to treat cancer or to boost treatments. Th Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Dying: Simple Act Of Feeding Poses Painful Choices

The Cost Of Dying: Simple Act Of Feeding Poses Painful Choices

A small plastic tube is all that stands between survival and starvation. The benefits of a feeding tube — helping elders who have forgotten how to eat — seem so obvious that it is used on one-third of demented nursing home residents, contributing to a growing device market worth $1.64 billion annually. Except it does little to help. And it can hurt. Decades after the tube achieved widespread use for people with irreversible dementia, some families are beginning to say no to them, as emerging research shows that artificial feeding prolongs, complicates and isolates dying. The tale of the feeding tube, known as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), is the latest installment of “Cost of Dying,” a series exploring how our technological ability to stave off death creates dilemmas unimaginable decades ago, when we died younger and more quickly. Food is how we comfort those we love; when all other forms of communication have vanished, feeding remains a final act of devotion. So the easy availability of feeding tubes forces a wrenching choice upon families: Do we say yes, condemning a loved one to dependency on a small plastic tube in their stomach? Or do we say no, consenting to their death? Blessing, then a curse Tubes are useful as a nutritional tool for patients struggling with a critical illness, such as Lou Gehrig’s disease, or recovering from stroke, cancer or anorexia. But if no turnaround is in sight — particularly in elders with progressive neurological illness — they can be a dreadful mistake, medical researchers now say. For families praying for a reversal, or just the gift of a few more days, the decision to insert a tube into the stomach can initially feel like the right choice. The device helped sustain Fran Cole’s beloved mother when Parkins Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Fear, Uncertainty And Doubt

Ketosis: Fear, Uncertainty And Doubt

Perhaps nothing is more damaging to the new low-carber than the intentional spread of fear, uncertainty and doubt regarding the state of ketosis compared to the dangerous state of ketoacidosis. The former is a natural and healthy state of existence, the latter is a condition that threatens the life of type 1 diabetics and type 2 diabetics whose disease has progressed to the point where their pancreatic beta cells can no longer produce insulin (ketoacidosis is also a risk for alcoholics). So if you’re not an alcoholic, a type 1 diabetic or a late-stage type 2 diabetic, fear of ketosis is misdirected. You should regard with suspicion anyone who confuses the two and warns you against a low-carb diet because they cannot tell the difference. The confusion between ketosis and ketoacidosis is a sign of a grave misunderstanding of basic biology (if not a complete lack of critical faculty). So too is the assumption that ketosis is the “early stage” of ketoacidosis or that “ketosis leads to ketoacidosis” in a person whose pancreas is still able to produce insulin. If you don’t trust me (and why should you), you should consider listening to some people who know a lot more about this than either you or I ever will: Nutritional ketosis is by definition a benign metabolic state… by contrast, ‘diabetic ketoacidosis’ is an unstable and dangerous condition that occurs when there is inadequate pancreatic insulin response to regulate serum B-OHB. This occurs only in type-1 diabetics or in late stage type-2 diabetics with advanced pancreatic burnout. (Dr. Phinney & Dr. Volek, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, p.4) Later in the book (p.80), Phinney and Volek explain further: [Type-1 diabetics] need insulin injections not just to control blood glucose levels, Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

Journey Into Ketosis Part Ii

Journey Into Ketosis Part Ii

TL;DR This is a journal of my first month of ketosis. A quick recap of Part I: Ketosis is when your body metabolizes fat instead of sugar as its primary fuel source. To enter ketosis you must eat fewer than 50 grams of carbs per day for a minimum of two weeks, and ideally 60-80% of your diet is fat. You can measure blood ketones with over-the counter-tests. Ketones are the preferred fuel for organs like your brain, heart, and muscles. Ketosis is safe and all humans show improved blood lipid profiles, profound anti-inflammation, and weight loss with lean muscle mass preservation in ketosis, better than any other diet. May 2014: The Descent Of Insulin I had just returned from a two week long trip to Israel and Jordan. On the flight back I finished reading The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Living, which answered all my questions about ketosis. (The Art and Science...Performance is a wonderful, short follow up, and Keto Clarity is on the to-read list.) I had been "paleo" for about five years, which for me meant avoiding grains and most sugars. I was not striving for high fat, and I still occasionally craved sugar. One way to know you've achieved ketosis is measuring blood levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BOHB. It's the fuel your liver produces when it metabolizes fat. Your organs, especially your brain, consume it copiously. You can measure BOHB by pricking your finger with a Precision Xtra lance, bleeding on to a ketone test strip, inserting the strip into the Precision Xtra, and waiting. It will spit out your blood ketone density in milligrams of ketones per millimoler of blood. The (semi-arbitrarily) decided on level for a human to be in "nutritional ketosis" is a minimum of 0.5 mg/mmL. I was eating "low carb" for five years, so I figured this was easy, and I was Continue reading >>

New Mother Nearly Dies From A Low Carb Diet: 32-year-old Developed Life-threatening Condition After Ditching Bread, Rice And Pasta While Breastfeeding

New Mother Nearly Dies From A Low Carb Diet: 32-year-old Developed Life-threatening Condition After Ditching Bread, Rice And Pasta While Breastfeeding

A new mother developed a life-threatening condition due to eating a low carbohydrate diet while breastfeeding, doctors claim. The 32-year-old Swedish woman was rushed to hospital with nausea and vomiting, heart palpitations, trembling and spasms in her limbs. When questioned, she said she had been following a a strict low carbohydrate high fat diet (LCHF) in order to lose her baby weight, doctors describing her case in the Journal of Medical Case Reports said. The regime saw the woman, who is unidentified, eating less than 20g of carbohydrate day, the equivalent of a medium-sized potato, or a thick slice of toast, while breastfeeding her 10-month-old son. In the UK, adults are advised to get half of their daily energy intake from carbohydrates, according to a report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition, who advise the Government. This is the equivalent of 200 - 240g of carbohydrates in a person eating 2,000 calories a day. The woman said she had lost 4kg on the diet but had begun to feel very ill. In hospital, medics carried out tests and discovered she was suffering from ketoacidosis, a rare but potentially life-threatening condition normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. ‘The primary diagnosis was thought to be ketoacidosis due to starvation induced by the LCHF diet,’ doctors writing in the journal. When a person has raised blood glucose levels, or are eating a low carbohydrate diet, their body may go into a state of ketosis. Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blo Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ok, first thing is first, before we get into the Ketogenic diet and alcohol’s effect on ketosis; that is most western cultures drink far too much. Now I know most people (those on a keto diet included) don’t want to hear that, and I’m not trying to be a party-pooper, but I’m here to tell you the truth as I know it, not to tell you what you want to hear. Anyway, there’s a little room for debate depending on how you read the evidence on whether there’s room in a Ketogenic Diet for alcohol and whether alcohol will throw you out of ketosis, it may or may not, but there are certainly side effects to be aware of, some very dangerous. Ketogenic Diet and Alcohol Effects on Ketosis I’ve read quite a few articles and forums about keto and alcohol and almost all of them dance around it looking for some loophole in the figures to squeeze in some amount of alcohol. Many try to satisfy the vast majority who think giving away alcohol on a keto diet will be a deal breaker. They all try hard I have to say. Let’s be real, if you’re dying to fit alcohol into your ketogenic diet and it’s a must have for you, I doubt the small amount that could possibly fit in will satisfy you. Here are a few things to consider if you’re to drink alcohol while trying to maintain a keto diet: You will undoubtedly get drunk much quicker on a ketogenic diet than if you weren’t. Hangovers will be worse, as you know a keto diet flushes your body of water retention and the chances that you’ll be staying hydrated while drinking is slim, alcohol is notorious for dehydrating you. Even if alcohol itself doesn’t kick you out of ketosis, when tipsy self-control goes out the window, you’re likely to eat whatever is in front of you. If you are determined to include alcohol in your ketogenic Continue reading >>

Dying To Find The Right Diet For You?

Dying To Find The Right Diet For You?

In today’s world, we live among an abundance of options to choose from when it comes to the foods we eat. There are many factors to consider when making this daily decision, whether it is based on lifestyle, allergies, or even your blood type! We get that there is a lot of hype surrounding some of these avenues as well, but they all have their benefits! Although we are not doctors, we are definitely informed wellness advocates who do know that no matter the route you take, having plant-based options weaved throughout your day to day is still paramount. Fruits and vegetables provide our bodies with vitamins, minerals, and all the essential nutrients like not many other food groups have the ability to do! Some ways you can navigate the sea of options would be through either trying an “elimination diet”, a cleanse, or checking with your physician. Some diets may be temporary to fulfill a certain goal, others are lifelong and represent a life that feels more balanced and supported. Even trying out interesting online quizzes like this one (linked) by BBC to show whether you are more of an emotional eater, feaster, or constant craver. All in all, we hope that your aim is to live not only a long life, but a great quality life. If you are wondering what Raw Republic can do for you on your health journey, just step foot inside and ask our amazing staff how we can serve you what you need! Vegan / Vegetarian Vegans and vegetarians are similar in the case that they both are diets that do not include meat. One of the main differences is that vegetarians have more flexibility in whether they choose to include either dairy or some fish (pescatarian). Vegans can also decide on whether they do not want to consume honey, or even use lifestyle products that have anything to do with Continue reading >>

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