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Ketosis What To Expect

Life On Keto – What To Expect On A Ketogenic Diet

Life On Keto – What To Expect On A Ketogenic Diet

A Ketogenic diet when done correctly, is a very simple and effective tool for fat loss and muscle gains. If you are unsure what a Ketogenic Diet is, check out my introduction post to Ketogenic dieting here. Speaking from experience of being on a personally modified Ketogenic diet for almost two years, I am going to enlighten you as to what you can expect when you undertake the low carb, high fat lifestyle. THE GOOD 1. Increased Testosterone Keto, when done correctly, and by correctly I mean eating a large quantities of meat, restricting carbs to under 30 – 50g per day and making sure you get a decent serve of veggies every day, you’re going to be naturally boosting your testosterone levels, and will notice that you will start feeling more and more awesome as time goes on. Cholesterol is a precursor for testosterone production and you should be eating a lot of cholesterol rich foods on Keto. When your body isn’t dealing with inflammation caused by the ignorant abuse of carbohydrates, you’ll notice that your blood work will improve from eating cholesterol rich foods (it’s the carbohydrates that cause the unhealthy levels), which is largely responsible for increasing your test levels. High testosterone will result in you becoming: More aggressive Stronger Smarter Leaner Happier More physically attractive More sexually aggressive and desirable More disciplined More awesome in all regards If you do Keto correctly and your testosterone levels will shoot through the roof. 2. Mental Focus When your brain is using ketones for fuel, you can literally feel the difference If you have ever successfully applied Ketogenic dieting before, you probably would have noticed an improvement in your mental focus. That’s because your brain operates much more effectively on ketones Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About The Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

What You Should Know About The Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Though it was originally developed to treat patients with epilepsy, interest in the ketogenic diet has taken off in recent years as we've learned more about its therapeutic and health benefits. Here’s what you need to know about ‘keto’ and why some health experts believe it's good for your body — especially your brain. Fasting and other ketogenic-like diets have been used to treat conditions like epilepsy for thousands of years. And in fact, a version of the keto diet has been traced back to 500 BC. Fast forwarding a bit, Dr. Rawle Geyelin gave a 1921 presentation to the American Medical Association in which he reported on the remarkable outcomes of several children who had benefited from fasting; his patients were having fewer seizures — and the effect appeared to be long-lasting. Geyelin continued this work, and he developed a tolerable and reproducible high-fat and low carbohydrate diet now formally known as the ketogenic diet. For the next two decades, it was used by physicians to minimize seizures in their patients. Once modern antiepileptic drugs were introduced, however, the practice declined dramatically. But interest in keto was renewed about 20 years ago as a number of scientists began to study it more closely — and not just for its ability to treat epilepsy. As we’re now learning, and despite its reputation as a “starvation” diet, a keto regimen has been shown to confer a variety of benefits. The state of ketosis The ketogenic diet is essentially a way to get our bodies to enter into a condition known as ketosis. Normally, our bodies rely on glucose for fuel — the result of our moderate to high-carb diets. Carbohydrates are broken down to glucose, which gets converted into energy and transported to our muscles and organs. But when carbs ar Continue reading >>

Two Weeks Of Keto Eating — What You Need To Know.

Two Weeks Of Keto Eating — What You Need To Know.

Two weeks of Keto eating — what you need to know. Almost two weeks ago I wrote this — the start of my journey into a strict and monitored 90 day (minimum) ketogenic diet. I also promised regular and public updates. I’ve been semi-true to that goal — I’ve been doing regular updates over on twitter and I’ve even made my measurements spreadsheet public. What I haven’t done is blog; because blogging is hard and I really haven’t felt like doing it for a few weeks. Weight And Fat As it stands right now after 12 days, Ive dropped 3.3 Kg & 0.3% of fat — although at this stage since i’m using a connected scale to measure you have to assume a 2% margin of error — lets talk again in 2 additional weeks. Let’s be clear — I’m aware not all of that weight is real, some of it will be ‘water weight’ — the body using its carb stores and dumping water as that process happens. If you look at my spreadsheet, that clearly explains the initial rapid 2KG drop; but the next 1.3 seems genuine. What’s also interesting is that my initial measurements have improved; at the 1-week mark this could be down to bloating, so I can’t wait to compare to this coming Mondays when we should see a more realistic change. I wanted to get the weight and measurements out of the way first — because that’s actually the least interesting part for me. If you read my initial article you’ll understand that for me, this is more about a long term lifestyle change than short term weight/fat loss — although they are of-course related. Sleep — Quality and Duration My spreadsheet suggests my quality of sleep remains unchanged, both the duration and quality. The way I ‘feel’ doesn’t agree, so for the remainder of the 90-day period I’m going to focus a LOT more on the leng Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Ketosis Induction Phase Survival Guide

The Ultimate Ketosis Induction Phase Survival Guide

As someone who has gone through the ketosis induction phase many times now I felt like writing a ketosis induction phase survival guide, so to speak. I’m currently on day 5 of ketosis induction and want to share a day-by-day analysis of what to expect during keto-induction including hunger levels, energy levels, physical changes both internal and external and anything else you may find during your own induction phase. I’ll start with a little info on the keto-induction phase before moving into my daily expectations log and finally provide tips and suggestions on how to survive induction and speed up the induction process a little. What is ketosis induction? Ketosis induction (or keto-induction) is the process of your body moving from a glucose fueled metabolism to a ketone fueled metabolism. This means your body, once depleted of remaining glycogen stores, starts adapting itself to breaking down fat into ketones as an alternative fuel source to survive. It takes time for your body to adjust and become efficient at using its new fuel source. Once the induction phase completes, we call it being keto-adapted, meaning your body has now adapted to using fat as it’s primary fuel source. How long does keto-induction take? This varies from person to person and hence everyone’s experience, my own included, may differ greatly from another’s experience. The average time for keto-induction seems to be about 2 weeks according to most people’s experience but I have heard of it ranging from just a few days, up to 8 weeks. For me, it depends on how long I’ve been out of ketosis. If I’ve had a single day of carb bingeing I can get back into ketosis in a day or two. I didn’t watch my diet at all last month though and expect induction to be a full 2 weeks, which is about Continue reading >>

6 Things That Happen To Your Body When You Go On A Ketogenic Diet

6 Things That Happen To Your Body When You Go On A Ketogenic Diet

By now, you've probably heard of the ketogenic diet, or a low-carb, high-fat diet. It’s a popular diet trend among athletes and average folk alike. (Who doesn't love the idea of eating more steak and bacon?) But what actually happens to your body when you go on the ketogenic diet? To understand how the ketogenic diet works, you have to understand ketosis, the process by which your body is starved of glucose for fuel and must look to fat sources instead. Typically, you fuel your body by giving it glucose in the form of carbs, which can be found in flour, grains, vegetables, legumes, dairy products, and fruits. We usually introduce a steady stream of this type of fuel into our bodies with each meal or snack, explains Pamela Nisevich Bede MS, RD, CSSD, LD. These carbohydrates are usually the body’s first choice when looking for an instant fix. “When a carb is available, the body will naturally turn to this to make energy instead of dietary fat or stored body fat. However, when we remove carbohydrates from our diet, our bodies begin to break down fat and turn to a fuel source in the form of ketones, which is more efficient but generally underutilized,” explains Bede. Rob Gronkowski's Diet: This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. End of dialog window. Ketones are a substance produced by the liver when the body breaks down fat for energy, which are then released into the blood. Your body's cells use ketones to power everyday activities. When there’s a buildup of ketones in the blood and you’re switching gears into an ketogenic state, your body changes in some incredible ways. 1) Your insulin levels drop. On a normal diet, after eating glucose-containing foods, your insulin levels will be higher. But when you’r Continue reading >>

What Happens In The First Few Days Of A Ketogenic Diet?

What Happens In The First Few Days Of A Ketogenic Diet?

The ketogenic diet comes with the caveat of experiencing the keto flu. The keto flu can stop you from getting into ketosis quickly as it may place a psychological barrier in from of you preventing you from continuing with the diet. Here’s a basic outline on why keto flu occurs and the simple and effective steps you can take to minimise the negative effects. The keto flu is generally a sign that the ketogenic diet is working. There are some measures you can take to firstly, speed up how quickly you get into ketosis and secondly reduce the symptoms of the keto flu. Ketosis (using fat for energy) occurs when your diet is comprised of high fat and low carb. Generally, this entails consuming 5% carbohydrates (or 50g per day). The keto flu describes the symptoms (flu-like) which come when people transition from using glucose as their primary source of fuel to ketones as their primary source of fuel. The body may fail to quickly enough as it struggles to use the dramatic change in macronutrient ratios effectively. Flu symptoms may include: Fatigue Craving for sugary foods Nausea Headaches Brain fog Problems sleeping Irritability The keto-flu duration and severity is different for everyone and this is going to depend on a few key factors. The first reason is based on how drastic the reduction of carbs are. You will enter the state of ketosis much quicker this way, but the downside of this is that the symptoms of the keto flu are likely going to be more pronounced. Symptoms are dependent on the drastic of the cut of carbohydrates but also your age, gender, exercise frequency. The flu will generally last about a week. This may last upwards of several for some individuals, or as little as a few days if you are lucky or take more extreme measures such as incorporating a prolonged Continue reading >>

What To Expect On A Ketogenic Diet

What To Expect On A Ketogenic Diet

With the seemingly infinite range of food choices, availability, and convenience in today’s world, watching what you eat has never been so important. And lacking the time (and qualifications) to draw up detailed, personalized food plans, most of us turn to diet programs at some point. But knowing which one to pick is never easy, and it never pays to start out on one without knowing what the eventual payout will be. The ketogenic diet has been consistently growing in popularity and notoriety in recent years. But it seems to be masked with a lot of confusion and misinformation. Ever wonder exactly what you can expect from the ketogenic diet? We’ll fill you in. A lot of people think this is the best diet in the world. But what can you expect on a ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet (or keto diet) is a high-fat, low-carb diet. Its bread and butter are meats, full-fat dairy, and vegetables, while it cuts out grains, high-glycemic fruits that spike blood sugar levels, and processed foods. It’s pretty radical compared to similar low-carb diets like Atkins in that it either completely eliminates or significantly reduces your carb intake. But there’s a very good reason for this. Put simply, the ketogenic diet changes (and indeed upgrades) your body’s energy supplier. Being starved of glucose-producing carbohydrates, the body starts burning fat in the liver which, in turn, produces ketones. When these ketones become the main source of your body’s fuel, one enters into a state of ketosis (never to be confused with ketoacidosis). Putting your body into ketosis brings amazing advantages. Weight loss is one of the clearest benefits of the keto diet, letting you reap all the rewards of fasting without having to go through its famishing downsides. And drawing on your body’ Continue reading >>

What It Feels Like To Be On The Keto Diet

What It Feels Like To Be On The Keto Diet

Putting your body into ketosis—causing it to switch from burning carbs to burning fat for fuel—is a major metabolic change. Some people don’t react well, while others thrive on it and feel more energy. “Low-carb and ketogenic diets aren’t for everyone, so it’s important to listen to your body,” says Alissa Rumsey, R.D., C.S.C.S., of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “If after a few weeks you still feel worse than you did before you started, you should stop and reconsider if it’s the right diet for you.” Here’s what she says you should expect when going keto. The first few days on keto You may feel low on energy, lethargic, and dizzy. Some people suffer from headaches or flulike symptoms during the first few days or weeks due to the depletion of muscle glycogen and the lack of glucose. This is the hard part, because you have to avoid eating carbohydrates to halt the cycle of glucose-based metabolism, even though your glycogen stores are dwindling and your cravings are probably increasing. Your body is used to burning glucose, not fat, for fuel, which is why—for the first few weeks, while your body adapts—your energy levels may be down. The first week on keto You’ll likely see a pretty rapid weight loss in the first week, though this will be from water depletion. Glycogen is attached to water in our bodies, so when you lose glycogen, you also lose water—as much as four-plus pounds of just fluid. Your workouts may also suffer during the first few weeks; many people report a loss of strength and endurance until their bodies become more efficient at using fats for fuel. The second week on keto Your body will still be adapting to using fat for fuel, but toward the end of the second week and into the third week, you may start to see increasi Continue reading >>

Preparing For Ketosis

Preparing For Ketosis

Recently, I wrote about Ketogenic eating. If you’re not sure what it is, go and acquaint yourself there, otherwise, keep on reading. Just like any change in your life, it takes time to adapt, and in this case, particularly for your body. How long does it take to enter Ketosis? As with everything biological, it does vary person to person. It could be as short as three days, or as long as ten. Making sure you keep your carbs under 20g a day in the first week is critical. If you make sure your carbs are that low, and fat is adequately high, you can probably expect to be in Ketosis within five days. As your body needs time to start effectively burning fat again, there will be a few days where you feel sub-par, often referred to as “Keto flu” What’s Ketoflu? And how long does it last? Ketoflu is a sort-of carb detox, your body doesn’t have any carbs left to burn, and isn’t yet great at burning fat, so you’ll feel like you have the flu. How poorly you feel and how long it lasts varies, and it’s best to keep hydrated during this time. Many people have reported relief by drinking broth or stock, as sometimes you can feel very, very flat, from a lack of Sodium and Potassium. Thirst, Hydration, and Salt When you cut out carbs, your body will stop retaining unnecessary water. Due to this, you will lose weight rapidly in the first week. Another effect of this is that you’ll be going to the toilet a lot more, and intaking more water than you probably would on another diet. Because of the increased toilet visits, you’ll be losing minerals from your body, so also try and be mindful of how much salt you’re consuming. Remember, the body is very good at telling you what it needs, if you’re craving salt, you probably need it. Tip: See if you can track down ‘Lite Continue reading >>

How I Survived My First Week Of Keto (low Carb Ketosis)

How I Survived My First Week Of Keto (low Carb Ketosis)

How I Survived My First Week of Keto (Low Carb Ketosis) – The first few days of a diet are the most important ones. I, like many others, have a hard time staying motivated and focused on a new diet and tend not to stick to one. Here are my 5 tips on how I survived week 1 of the ketogenic diet for beginners – the longest “diet” I have ever lasted on! Love seeing the results! © Jessmine / Dollar Photo Club As the week started to come to an end, I thought many times if I wanted to share this kind of post or not. Should my blog be only about recipes? Is this type of post a little too personal? In the end, I thought what the heck, just write that darn post. I’m sure I am not the only person who is wondering how the heck does one survive the first week of keto or any diet. Dieting isn’t fun; dieting is HARD. It’s blood, sweat, tears hard for me. I can never stick to a diet and every time I start one I always fail and end up “cheating”. Either I wasn’t enjoying the type of food on each particular diet, or the diet was boring, or I didn’t see enough progress to keep chugging along. If you have read my blog for any amount of time, you should know I like quick meals that pack a big punch of flavor. Over an hour of prepping for the meal is a no-go with me. The longest prep snack I have made since being on keto was a mixed berry whip with approximately 15 minutes of prep time. Not too bad. So far I have lasted a FULL WEEK, and I am the happiest I have been in a long time. My energy is starting to come back, the food is fantastic, and I am down 6 pounds! And I forgot to mention, I am not starving!! I am satisfied and eat when I want to. I love not having to watch the clock and eat every 3 hours or so. ©MSPhotographic / Dollar Photo Club So here are my tips on Continue reading >>

What To Expect

What To Expect

What should I expect when starting a keto diet? –Frequent urination. When first starting a ketogenic diet, you will notice more frequent urination. This is normal. Carbohydrates hold onto excess water, and since you are limiting carbohydrates, your body is no longer holding onto this excess fluid. When this begins, you will need to consciously increase your electrolytes (sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) and water. The added electrolytes will help you maintain hydration levels and avoid unpleasant side effects of dehydration such as muscle cramping, constipation, and headaches. My favorite electrolytes are saltstick caps (can be purchased on amazon). I take at least 4 a day along with plenty of water (at least 64 oz a day — sometimes closer to 100 oz). –Weight loss. Most people notice weight loss that begins occurring very rapidly. At first, this is due to the purging of excess water weight. You may then notice a “plateau” in your weight loss. Do not be discouraged (if your goal is indeed weight loss), as this is also normal. Most people begin noticing that their clothes fit more loosely before the scale begins to really show a difference. –Hunger. While your body is making the transition from being a “sugar burner” (glucose) to being a “fat burner” (ketones), you may experience hunger or cravings. The best defense is a good offense in this regard. Plan ahead and keep keto-friendly, high fat snacks on hand. Avocado, coconut oil (yes, you can eat this straight), hard boiled eggs, ghee, homemade fat bombs, pork rinds, macadamia nuts, and almond butter are all great snacks. Watch the portions on the pork rinds (protein), macadamia nuts and almonds / almond butter (carbs) to be sure you stay within your determined daily limits and macro ratios. Continue reading >>

Keto Flu 101: Everything You Need To Know

Keto Flu 101: Everything You Need To Know

In Keto Flu 101 my goal is to answer the questions I get asked on a daily basis about the Keto Flu. Many people who are interested in going into ketosis are afraid that they will get the keto flu and are looking for ways to avoid getting it all together. While every person’s experience is different, knowledge is power, so prepare to arm yourself with as much information about the keto flu as possible before you start the diet, so you know what to expect. ~ This post contains affiliate links to help you find the products we use. Already started Keto? Don’t worry; this post will still give you the tools you need to prepare yourself as well. Look, this is the rest of your life we are talking about. As my favorite author, C.S. Lewis said “Hardship often prepares an ordinary person for an extraordinary destiny.” and that is true even in the case of the keto flu! Keto Flu 101: Everything You Need To Know The “keto flu” is what we commonly call carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms usually occur in people who start a low carb diet that alters their hormones and causes and electrolyte imbalances. Don’t let this alarm you; this is a GREAT thing. In other words, it describes a cycle in the body adapting to a newly started low carb diet. Think about the keyword here, which is withdrawal. The same way an addict withdrawal from any drug. Your body is so used to living off of carbs that both your body and your mind think you need these to survive. On most diets you’ve tried in the past, your mind was probably much harder to fight than your body. Maybe you’ve never been on a diet that caused you to go through any form of withdrawal, and that’s where you’ll find the greatest source of power when it comes to Keto! With Keto, once your body goes through w Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet – What To Expect

Atkins Diet – What To Expect

Having recently posted an overview of five popular low-carb plans, I’ve been asked which is the one I prefer myself. For me personally, it is still the good old Atkins. Having lost a substantial amount of weight on Atkins back in 2007, I still follow Atkins Maintenance principles. Here’s my advice on what to expect when you go on Atkins. Atkins Diet – quick overview Atkins is a classical LCHF diet – your food will be low in carbs, and high in fat and protein. The diet consists of four phases, starting with a really strict two-week Induction phase. It then gradually relaxes over phases 2-4. If you can manage the first two weeks, the rest will be much easier. Your carb allowance starts with just 20g of carbs a day on Induction (can be 30-40g for very active people). You then add more carbs and more food groups in increments throughout the next two phases. The last stage of Atkins – Maintenance – is more like a nutritional guideline rather than a “diet”. All wholefoods are back on the list, with only sugar and white flour excluded. By Maintenance stage, your carbs intake could be up to around 100g a day or over. This is a comfortable amount, but it is still lower than the average carb consumption of people who eat sugar and grains. Atkins Diet Phase 1 – Atkins Induction Atkins Induction is designed as a shock to your system. It completely resets your food habits, to break away from sugar addiction and kick-start fat-burning metabolism. The ultimate aim is to get you into ketosis – a safe and natural metabolic state where you will burn fat for fuel instead of carbs. Induction is very strict. You can only have 20g net carbs a day, and only from the list of permitted foods. This amounts to several cups of salad vegetables a day (see more information on Atk Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet As Epilepsy Treatment: What To Expect From The Treatment

Ketogenic Diet As Epilepsy Treatment: What To Expect From The Treatment

Epilepsy refers to a group of neurological disorders characterized by epileptic seizures. Seizures are brief episodes of vigorous shaking. An episode occurs due to abnormal electrical energy within the brain. Unfortunately, epileptic seizure has no known cause. But it could be a result of brain trauma, tumor, substance abuse and genetic mutations. There is also no known cure for epilepsy. It’s also common among children. While epilepsy has no known cure, there are treatments that could help prevent an episode. One such treatment is the ketogenic diet. What is Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic is a high-calorie, high-fat diet that requires a child to eat four times per day. Each meal, the patient should be given calorific foods from carbohydrates or protein. An example of a meal includes a small portion of chicken, a serving of fruit and loads of butter or cream. Simply put, ketogenic diet isn’t meant for grownups at all. There is the real risk of developing heart diseases if grownups took this diet. To start the diet, the child has to be taken to the hospital for observation. During the first 36 to 48 hours, the patient has to fast. After fasting, solid food is gradually introduced. Most of the food are high in calories. Although a ketogenic diet is accepted for its therapeutic effects, it will not provide all the nutrients your child needs for the day. As such, your child will be given sugar-free supplements. How Ketogenic Diet Works Ketogenic diet was developed in the 1920s and was meant to treat epilepsy. However, after anticonvulsant drugs were introduced, the diet was abandoned. Most experts do not know how this diet change the body at all. But the general concept was by reducing the amount of carbohydrates a person eats, the body will start burning off fat instead. Th Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

7 Signs You Might Be In Ketosis When Doing The Ketogenic Diet

One of the main goals of starting the ketogenic diet is to get your body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. Note: If you don’t know what the ketogenic is all about then check out the Ketogenic Diet: Beginner’s Guide to Keto and Weight Loss. This is when your body starts to produce a lot of ketones to supply energy for your body. Why is this good? Because it means your body has converted from a sugar-burner to a fat-burner. If your body is burning fat for energy then something amazing starts to happen. The fat on your body starts to disappear. But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Besides using test strips or an instrument there are some signs that your body will give. 7 Signs You Might Be in Ketosis These don’t 100% guarantee that your body is in ketosis but if it is in ketosis then these signs will appear. 1. Weight Loss One of the obvious signs of ketosis is weight loss but this can also be pretty deceptive because many people don’t experience the kind of weight loss that they expect. This can happen for a variety of reasons but when you get close to entering ketosis or do enter ketosis you’ll find that you lose a healthy amount of weight quickly. For example, when you switch to low carbs you usually experience significant weight loss in the first week. In fact, my wife lost 12 lbs in the first 28 days of Keto and I lost 13. This isn’t your body burning fat but finally being able to release the water that was being held by the fat cells. If your fat cells don’t release this water then they can’t flow through the bloodstream to be used as fuel so losing water weight is a good thing. After the initial rapid drop in water weight, you should continue to lose body fat consistently if you are able to stick with the low-carb aspects of the diet Continue reading >>

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