diabetestalk.net

Ketosis What Fats To Eat

Low Carb Food List

Low Carb Food List

Here’s a low carb food list to help you get started. I have also included buying techniques and tips that will point you toward ketogenic foods that are clean, whole and offer the best nutrition. This includes information on the types of fats that are the healthiest, and where to find grass-fed meat and poultry. Fats and Oils Since the majority of calories on a ketogenic diet will come from dietary fats, choices should be made with digestive tolerance in mind. Most people cannot tolerate eating a large amount of vegetable oil, mayonnaise or even olive oil over time. And this is a good thing, since vegetable oils are high in polyunsaturated Omega-6 fatty acids. The Omega-6 fatty acids (found in nut oils, margarine, soybean oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, corn oil, and canola oil) trigger inflammation within the body and they will make you sick if they are your only fat source. In addition, cooking with them is not recommended. Most nuts (with the exceptions of macadamias and walnuts) are high in Omega 6 fatty acids as well, so go easy on them). However, there are polyunsaturated fats which are essential and these are the Omega 6 and Omega 3 fats. Your intake of Omega 6 and Omega 3 types should be balanced, and you only need about a teaspoon a day. Eating wild salmon, tuna and shellfish will provide balancing Omega 3 fatty acids and are important part of a low carb food list. A few nuts or some mayonnaise will provide the Omega 6. If you don't like seafood, then consider taking small amounts of a fish oil supplement for Omega 3s. Saturated and monounsaturated fats such as butter, macadamia nuts, coconut oil, avocado and egg yolks are tolerated more easily by most people, and since they are more chemically stable, they are less inflammatory. Fats and oils can be combi Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Eating fat to burn fat sounds contradictory, if not nuts, right? The world is full of people who are fat because of high-fat diets, so why would a fit person want to follow suit? I'm not talking about stuffing your face full of peanut butter cups. I'm talking about following a ketogenic diet—or, put simply, a high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diet designed to make the body burn fat for fuel. Bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, and researchers alike have found that such diets are an effective fat-loss tool. In fact, studies have shown that ketogenic diets induce numerous favorable metabolic and physiological changes, including weight loss, less oxidative stress, improved body composition, reduced inflammation, and increased insulin sensitivity.[1-4] That being said, what does the science surrounding ketogenic diets have to say about individuals looking to run faster or farther, jump higher, or improve other aspects of sports performance? Shouldn't athletes be swilling Gatorade before, during, and after their events instead of adopting a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate diet? Not necessarily. Ketogenic diets have become increasingly popular among athletes ranging from Olympic competitors to endurance runners, with good reason. Let's take a closer look at the science. What Exactly Is A Ketogenic Diet, Anyway? Ketogenic diets are very high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets.[5] The exact breakdown of the diet varies between individuals, but a general profile may reflect 70-75 percent fat, 15-20 percent protein, and only 5-10 percent carbohydrate. So, you're probably thinking, all I need to do then is watch out for the carbs, right? Not exactly. Ketogenic diets are not the same as high-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets. I often hear Continue reading >>

If 0-50 Grams Is Required For Ketosis, And I'm Eating Around 20, How Much Fat/day Do I Need?

If 0-50 Grams Is Required For Ketosis, And I'm Eating Around 20, How Much Fat/day Do I Need?

I don't do Keto diets anymore, but I had marginal success running Carb Backloading a few years ago. In this diet I consumed from .5gprotein per 1g of fat up to a 1:1 ratio of protein to fat. Don't go over that and staying closer to the lower range if you are afraid of getting knocked out of keto. There is no set amount of fat to eat per day, just eat it by those ratios as a minimum. Keep in mind you are eating the fat to slow gastric emptying of the stomach and slow absorbtion rates of your protein so it doesn't spike insuling too much. This means avoid big meals might help and eating more fat per gram of protein should increase the chances you stay in ketosis. Otherwise eat when you're hungry. If you gain weight over a period of time, say 3 weeks, you may need to curb total caloric intake. The phrase used by medical researchers is “ad lib eating.” Most people adopting a ketogenic diet simply monitor net carbs (total carbs minus fiber) and ad lib eat. They don’t really watch other macronutrients and simply eat until full. Some people because ketones come from fats tend to fat load and especially things like coconut oil that have high medium chain triglycerides that are shown to be quite ketogenic. I’m not a big fan of this approach because you can stall or gain weight on a ketogenic diet and the usual culprit is too much fat. My opinion is not to worry about it too much and don’t try to overload on fats. Eat fats as part of your diet and eat until you are full. You’ll be fine. It’s really quite a natural way of eating. Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

Eating Fat, Lifting Cows, And Preventing Seizures — An Intro To The Ketogenic Diet (with Dom D’agostino)

Eating Fat, Lifting Cows, And Preventing Seizures — An Intro To The Ketogenic Diet (with Dom D’agostino)

Eating Fat, Lifting Cows, and Preventing Seizures — An Intro to the Ketogenic Diet (with Dom D’Agostino) We’re about to dive into the world of ketosis with Dominic D’Agostino. But, to get there, we must first rewind the clock and start where Dom began. There’s a problem. We’re asked to solve it. Navy SEALs divers are getting uncontrollable seizures from oxygen toxicity during their dives. How can we prevent this? We scour the research. Eventually, we find an interesting study. Fasting is an effective treatment for seizures. In fact, it may be the MOST effective treatment for seizures. But fasting is only a short-term solution. We need something more sustainable. We read about the Ketogenic Diet. It mimics the effects of fasting without the undesired downside of starvation. Hmm… Enter The Ketogenic Diet Before us sits this Keto chest. In it lies the promise to prevent seizures. We walk to it, slowly reach for it’s handle, and pull open it’s top. We find more than we expected. Weird-sounding words. Articles with conflicting statements. Studies that only Harvard-graduated PhDs could understand. Most people would quit here. It’s just too much — too much jargon. Too much complicated science. Too much of an unfinished puzzle. There are other pressing matters to attend to. But we carry on. As we organize all the things that came flying out of the chest, we realize that our search for seizure prevention has opened a door to something with much broader implications. Something bigger even than cat pictures. We learn that the Ketogenic Diet is best known as an effective treatment for epilepsy, but early research shows data that supports further investigation in all these other areas as well: Cancer Alzheimer’s Parkinson’s Diabetes Brain Injury Metabolic S Continue reading >>

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

Keto Diet: The Do's And Don't's Of This High-fat, Low-carb Nutrition Plan

I'm often asked about popular diets, so this week and next I'm covering two popular diets - the Keto Diet this week, and Whole30 next week - including the pros, cons and my take for each. I am not advocating or recommending that we all follow these programs. While these diets - or components of these diets - may be beneficial to some, my recommendation for the majority of the population is to keep it simple, streamlined, wholesome - less about hard rules with lists of do's and don't's, and more about the key fundamentals: limit added sugars and white carbs. Emphasize lean proteins. Tons of vegetables, some fruits (mostly berries), and more of an emphasis on plant based fats when possible. Find what works for your individual lifestyle, taste preferences, budget and schedule. If you do choose to try one or some of these popular diets, use it as an opportunity to help break and replace not-so-good habits, and to educate yourself and learn more about how you may respond to certain foods and ingredients so that you can make lasting behavioral changes that can stick around long after you're "off" of a particular diet plan. *** "I'm going keto." I'm hearing this more and more often. And odds are you've heard someone talk about "going keto," you've considered it yourself, or at the very least, you've seen "keto-friendly" products and recipes in stores, magazines, and social media. Keto is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, with limited protein allowed as well. As with many of these diets, healthful food selections within each of those food categories is what determines whether the diet is healthful. The keto diet's origins "Keto" is short for "ketogenic" and is a type of diet that has been used for 100-plus years for children with uncontrolled seizures. Approximately half of th Continue reading >>

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

16 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet has become quite popular recently. Studies have found that this very low-carb, high-fat diet is effective for weight loss, diabetes and epilepsy (1, 2, 3). There's also early evidence to show that it may be beneficial for certain cancers, Alzheimer's disease and other diseases, too. A ketogenic diet typically limits carbs to 20–50 grams per day. While this may seem challenging, many nutritious foods can easily fit into this way of eating. Here are 16 healthy foods to eat on a ketogenic diet. Fish and shellfish are very keto-friendly foods. Salmon and other fish are rich in B vitamins, potassium and selenium, yet virtually carb-free (4). However, the carbs in different types of shellfish vary. For instance, while shrimp and most crabs contain no carbs, other types of shellfish do (5). While these shellfish can still be included on a ketogenic diet, it's important to account for these carbs when you're trying to stay within a narrow range. Here are the carb counts for 3.5-ounce (100-gram) servings of some popular types of shellfish (6, 7, 8, 9, 10): Clams: 5 grams Mussels: 7 grams Octopus: 4 grams Oysters: 4 grams Squid: 3 grams Salmon, sardines, mackerel and other fatty fish are very high in omega-3 fats, which have been found to lower insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese people (11). In addition, frequent fish intake has been linked to a decreased risk of disease and improved mental health (12, 13). Aim to consume at least two servings of seafood weekly. Many types of seafood are carb-free or very low in carbs. Fish and shellfish are also good sources of vitamins, minerals and omega-3s. Non-starchy vegetables are low in calories and carbs, but high in many nutrients, including vitamin C and several minerals. Vegeta Continue reading >>

Why Do We Need To Eat Fat For Ketosis, If We Already Have Bodily Reserves?

Why Do We Need To Eat Fat For Ketosis, If We Already Have Bodily Reserves?

This is perhaps a stupid question, however it's something that's baffled me recently. If we're burning fat for energy, then why do we need to consume fat if we already have reserves in our body that can be burned, assuming we already do? Is our body fat a last resort? What then happens to the fat that is consumed and how is hunger then regulated? Thanks! Continue reading >>

The Low-carb, High-fat Diet That's Sweeping The Nation

The Low-carb, High-fat Diet That's Sweeping The Nation

It took a while, but by now most of us know that fat is not the enemy, that there are certain kinds of fat that can actually help your heart, and that it need not be obliterated from your diet if you’re trying to lose weight. In fact, for some people, fat is actually the superhero of their diet—and chowing down on olive oil, butter, and heavy cream is the key to watching the scale dive lower and lower, without feeling hungry or deprived. But can a diet heavy on the heavy cream turn out to be not unsafe—and maybe even good for you? We consulted top-shelf, unbiased sources that specialize in diet and nutrition, and were surprised to find that the answer is a resounding yes. First, the basics about the diet. It’s called a ketogenic diet, one that’s heavy on fat, moderate in protein, and extremely light in carbohydrates (typically less than 50g a day). The way it works involves a neat little trick of your body’s own biology, says Charles Passler, a nutritionist in New York City, who works with many of the top models you see sashaying down the runways at fashion week. (Bella Hadid is among his clients, as are many of the Victoria’s Secret models, including Adriana Lima.) The body typically burns carbohydrates—aka glucose—for fuel. But if you give your body little to no carbohydrates, it will go into ketosis. This is a state in which fat stores in the body are broken down into ketones, which then fuel the muscles and brain. If that sounds a bit odd, it’s not, says Passler. “The human body is designed to be able to handle times of food scarcity,” says Passler. “The trouble is, we currently have access to food 24/7, but our physiology hasn’t caught up with that yet. Say you have breakfast at 8 a.m., and then it's 1 p.m. and you think you're starving, Continue reading >>

After Being In Ketosis For A Few Weeks And Eating Carbs Does Your Body Still Burn Fat At A Higher Rate For A Time?

After Being In Ketosis For A Few Weeks And Eating Carbs Does Your Body Still Burn Fat At A Higher Rate For A Time?

Most likely yes, but this isn’t necessarily a good thing. Let’s say you make a dramatic shift from a high fat low carb diet to a low fat high carb diet. Since you’ve avoided carbohydrates for a period of time, you likely will not tolerate them as well when you first reintroduce them. Since you are not burning carbs efficiently they may be stored as body fat, despite your body becoming so efficient at oxidizing fat for fuel. In my opinion this is the most likely scenario based on how the body works, but it doesn’t necessarily apply to everyone. You may not have been in ketosis long enough for this to happen. You may still be producing the enzymes that break down carbs. Basically, with our bodies and food intake, there’s always a compensatory effect. Continue reading >>

The Diet I'm On Seems To Have Everything Right. I Am Allowed A Maximum Of Two Tablespoons Of Olive Oil Per Day. I Also Take Omega 3 Supplements. Is It Possible To Achieve Fat Burning Ketosis Without Eating So Much Extra Fat?

The Diet I'm On Seems To Have Everything Right. I Am Allowed A Maximum Of Two Tablespoons Of Olive Oil Per Day. I Also Take Omega 3 Supplements. Is It Possible To Achieve Fat Burning Ketosis Without Eating So Much Extra Fat?

As Sarah Strelow said, to achieve the true fat burning effects of ketosis, your diet needs to be almost entirely fat and protein. You want 70-80% of your total daily calories to be from fat, with about 15% from protein, and 5% or less from carbohydrates. If you are TRULY in ketosis you won't be storing all the extra dietary fat as fat, you're will be converting it to multiple usable energy sources in your body, mainly glucose( blood sugar), which will be burned off. So if you eat 2000 calories per day you should eat around 165g of fat a day, with about 80g of protein( kind of low if you want to maintain large amounts of muscle) and less than or equal to 25g of carbs daily. Hope this helped. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Ketogenic Diet Food List: Everything You Need To Know

Not sure what to eat on a ketogenic diet? Here’s a quick food list for you to reference. Below you’ll find a brief overview of what you can eat. Scroll further down to see more details on each section. Being on a diet isn’t the easiest thing in the world, especially when you don’t know what you should eat. We’ve put together this ketogenic diet food list to help people out there make decisions on what they are eating and shopping for. Below you can find a quick visual guide to what to eat on a ketogenic diet. Let’s go over some of the commonly identifiable items that people use on keto: All of the food above sticks to the strict 5% carbohydrate allowance that we use on keto. In general, you can eat from the following food groups: Fats & Oils. Try to get your fat from natural sources like meat and nuts. Supplement with saturated and monounsaturated fats like coconut oil, butter, and olive oil. Protein. Try to stick with organic, pasture-raised and grass-fed meat where possible. Most meats don’t have added sugar in them, so they can be consumed in moderate quantity. Remember that too much protein on a ketogenic diet is not a good thing. Vegetables. Fresh or frozen doesn’t matter. Stick with above ground vegetables, leaning toward leafy/green items. Dairy. Most dairy is fine, but make sure to buy full-fat dairy items. Harder cheeses typically have fewer carbs. Nuts and Seeds. In moderation, nuts and seeds can be used to create some fantastic textures. Try to use fattier nuts like macadamias and almonds. Beverages. Stay simple and stick to mostly water. You can flavor it if needed with stevia-based flavorings or lemon/lime juice. If you scroll down, you can see in-depth breakdowns of each section along with some ideas on what types of food to eat! If you’r Continue reading >>

Will My Body Burn Fat If I'm Eating 20g Of Carbs A Day, Or Do I Need To Be In Ketosis?

Will My Body Burn Fat If I'm Eating 20g Of Carbs A Day, Or Do I Need To Be In Ketosis?

Your body can and will burn fat regardless of whether you're in a state of nutritional ketosis, as long as you are consistently burning more calories than you are taking in. But if fat loss is your goal, a keto diet will likely get you where you want to go more quickly than any other diet/nutrition plan. Most people will enter the state of nutritional ketosis if they are consistently consuming 20g of net carbs per day. But you don't want to guess at what that that carb number is for you. And you don't have to. The carb limit for getting into a state of nutritional ketosis and staying there depends on your total daily calories, which is based on your age, weight, activity level, sex and weight loss goal, which you can quickly calculate here. From there it’s all about calculating the actual number of grams you need to take in for fat, protein, and carbs following the 75/20/5 keto ratio. And to come up with those number you simply multiply your total daily calorie goal by the percentage for each macro. You then divide each of those numbers by the calories per gram below: Fat = 9 calories per gram Protein = 4 calories per gram Carbs = 4 calories per gram Here's an example of how those macros would break down for the average male and female: Keep in mind that the carb number means net carbs. So when you're reading food labels be sure to subtract the grams of fiber from the grams of total carbs for your net carb number. For more information on following a keto diet, including free 4-week meal plans, visit Keto Diet Plan Explained, Best Ketogenic Diet Foods & Ketosis Diet Menu Continue reading >>

Eat Healthy Fat To Burn Fat Fast

Eat Healthy Fat To Burn Fat Fast

When it comes to losing weight, most people usually experience a plateau right at the point of making progress. It is mainly a result of the body fighting against the weight loss process through enhanced unhealthy food cravings and a change in hormone levels. Most people then gain back the lost weight as they succumb to the pressure from hormones, and have to start the entire process all over again. However, by following a LCHF ketogenic diet taking the body through ketosis, you are able to reprogram your hormones and continue losing weight without stalling. Being in ketosis is on the rise and is something that is very familiar to the low carb, keto, and paleo community. LCHF dieting is a way of eating that centers on limiting net carbs by eating fatty foods to burn fat. Being in ketosis supports weight loss and helps you keep up with your ketogenic dieting plan ensuring that you meet your goals. First, you need to understand the consequences of keto and make sure eating fat is the right lifestyle for you. Eating Fats to Burn Fat When you reduce your calorie intake by implementing a low carb high fat ketogenic diet, your body is forced to burn fat instead of carbs to get the level of energy needed. When the glycogen levels in the bloodstream drop, the body is forced to burn ketone bodies by using up fats instead of draining proteins in the muscles. It’s what is known as ketosis. If you feed on fat to burn fats, you are lowering your blood sugar and insulin levels and shifting your metabolism to fat burning ketones. See what foods to eat on keto for a better understanding. The ketone bodies prevent your body from working against you by reprogramming the active hormones in the process. This weight loss strategy can be used to get your mind off food cravings all the time Continue reading >>

If You Have Fasted For 24 Hours Will Eating A Ketogenic Diet Lower Your Rates Of Ketosis By Using The Proteins For Energy Instead Of Fat If You Are Not Keto-adapted?

If You Have Fasted For 24 Hours Will Eating A Ketogenic Diet Lower Your Rates Of Ketosis By Using The Proteins For Energy Instead Of Fat If You Are Not Keto-adapted?

One does NOT burn protein. Protein becomes amino acids which become glucose and it is glucose that competes with the burning of fat. All digested food including the amino acids from digested protein pass through the liver before reaching general circulation. Roughly half of them are metabolized in the liver and converted into glucose. Depending on how much is consumed this may be enough to break ketosis. (The commonly recommended 1.5 grams per kg of body mass is 120 grams for an 80 kg human. That alone becomes 60 grams of glucose which exceeds the commonly recommended 50 grams total when initiating ketosis. ) Even after a fast, one can break ketosis and this is why a ketogenic diet must not include macro levels of protein. For both the novice who might gain one pound of muscle per week and the pro who might plateau at one pound per month, one only needs 20–30 grams of protein beyond the RDA. For most that means 50–70 grams total. If one breaks ketosis and begins to require glucose the body will cannibalize muscle for those amino acids to convert into glucose. It is that damage which must be repaired after the next protein meal and which people try to prevent with still larger protein input. That just feeds the fire until one either saturates the small intestine’s ability to absorb protein (only a 15 gram serving for whey) or saturates the ability of muscle satellite cells to generate muscle nuclei to build new tissue. Better to build muscle slowly in ketosis and not be destroying it between meals. Continue reading >>

More in ketosis