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Ketosis Vs Low Carb

Low Carb Vs Keto - What's The Difference?

Low Carb Vs Keto - What's The Difference?

Low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets are often confused, perhaps in part because a ketogenic diet is, by default, also a low carbohydrate diet. That said, there are several important distinctions that set ketogenic diets apart from more generic low carbohydrate diets. Let's look a little more closely at each of those distinctions, so you can better understand why someone might wish to pursue a ketogenic diet. So, what's a low-carb diet? Okay, so here's where the greatest confusion generally comes in. A low-carbohydrate diet focuses on limiting carbohydrate intake. A ketogenic diet does the same. So how are they different? The difference is like that between a doctor and a surgeon. The surgeon is still a doctor but may be far more specialized. Keto diets, similarly, are specialized low-carb diets. So let's look at the generic—the low-carb diet—first. First, it's important to note that “low” in this case is pretty subjective. There's no clear consensus on how many carbs one can eat before a diet is no longer low-carbohydrate, for instance. In general, though, the idea here is to be more selective than the standard western diet. Often this means fruits, vegetables, and beans are still acceptable parts of the diet; while grains, baked goods, and processed sugars are either completely eliminated or drastically reduced. As a result of shifting from carbohydrate-dense foods in your diet, to more low-density foods, the daily carbohydrate quantity you intake is significantly cut. The subjectivity of the diet, however, can be problematic. For instance, if you were consuming 300 grams of carbohydrates daily, and cut it to 200 grams per day, this is a lower-carbohydrate diet. If you don't replace the lost calories, you may still lose weight, and technically, you could consi Continue reading >>

Comparing Three Popular Diet Trends: Paleo Vs Keto Vs Mediterranean

Comparing Three Popular Diet Trends: Paleo Vs Keto Vs Mediterranean

If you’re looking to be the fittest you can be you’ve undoubtedly looked into the diets that are likely to support your goals. You’re interested in being lean, maintaining muscle, peak performance and blowing away your doctor every time at your yearly physical. Unless you really are a cave dweller, you have heard of the Paleo (or similarly named) diets before. If you follow biohackers and scientific diet research, you’ve heard of the Ketogenic diet. And, if you ever watch or read the news, you most certainly have heard of the Mediterranean diet. Have you given any of them a try, maybe skimmed the surface or are considering which one might be best for you? When it comes to these three popular diets, Christopher Gardner, Ph.D. Professor of Medicine and Director of Nutrition Studies at Stanford University says, “the public health community should be open to these, and every other diet. We have an obesity epidemic that we haven’t been able to solve, and this goes hand in hand with a chronic disease epidemic that is crippling the health care system of the US.” So let’s look at these three diet trends, two of which have reliable research to back them up. They all include a moderate to high amount of protein intake which Americans love (a topic Dr. Gardener will be lecturing on this week). They can each give you great results for losing weight and improving important biomarkers. The issue, as with any diet is, can you adhere to one of these long term? Let’s start first with the newest of the trends – the Paleo diet - founded by Loren Cordain, Ph.D. and has branched off into a movement launching many other brands based on Dr. Cordain’s tenets of “eating foods you were designed to eat.” The belief is that when we switched from eating only foods we could Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Not to be confused with slow carb diet. This article is about low carbohydrate diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss. For low-carbohydrate dietary therapy for epilepsy, see Ketogenic diet. Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Foods high in easily digestible carbohydrates (e.g., sugar, bread, pasta) are limited or replaced with foods containing a higher percentage of fats and moderate protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (e.g., most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), although other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate allowed varies with different low-carbohydrate diets.[1] Such diets are sometimes 'ketogenic' (i.e., they restrict carbohydrate intake sufficiently to cause ketosis). The induction phase of the Atkins diet[2][3][4] is ketogenic. The term "low-carbohydrate diet" is generally applied to diets that restrict carbohydrates to less than 20% of caloric intake, but can also refer to diets that simply restrict or limit carbohydrates to less than recommended proportions (generally less than 45% of total energy coming from carbohydrates).[5][6] Definition and classification[edit] Low-carbohydrate diets are not well-defined.[7] The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[8] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[9] Used for Continue reading >>

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A keto or ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many proven benefits for weight loss, health and performance, as millions of people have experienced already. 1 Here you’ll learn how to eat a keto diet based on real foods. You’ll find visual guides, recipes, meal plans and a simple 2-week get started program, all you need to succeed on keto. Get even more, custom meal plans, ask the experts and low-carb TV, with a free trial. 1. Introduction: What is ketosis? The “keto” in a ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”. 2 This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then used as fuel throughout the body, including the brain. The brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day, 3 and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose… or ketones. On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low, and fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is obviously great if you’re trying to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, such as less hunger and a steady supply of energy. When the body produces ketones, it’s said to be in ketosis. The fastest way to get there is by fasting – not eating anything – but nobody can fast forever. A keto diet, on the other hand, can be eaten indefinite Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

It’s not uncommon for the ketogenic diet and the famous Atkin’s Diet of the 1990’s to get lumped into the same conversation as one and the same. But are they actually different, and is one healthier than the other? Which is more impactful over the long term? There are definitely differences between the two diets, and the real comparison might surprise you! But first, let’s step back and look at them individually. The Ketogenic Diet The ketogenic diet was founded all the way back in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the famous Mayo Clinic. The diet was initially used because it was discovered to be highly effective in treating epilepsy. The principles of the ketogenic diet are based on eating a specific percentage of macronutrients: high fats (60%), adequate protein (35%), and low carbohydrates (5%), to force the body to use what are called “ketone bodies” for energy. In the absence of carbohydrates for an extended period of time, our liver converts fats into fatty acids and ketone bodies, also just simply called “ketones.” Ketones can then be processed into ATP, which is the energy currency of the cells. Now, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood leads to a state known as nutritional ketosis. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet There are several ways the ketogenic diet can help the health and lifestyles of those who follow it. Here are some of the biggest advantages: Blood Sugar Stabilization The ketogenic diet actively helps to lower glucose levels and improve insulin resistance. Without having frequent carbohydrate intake, blood sugar levels can stabilize more rapidly. Trigger Fat Burning Ketogenic diets can also be very effective for fat loss because they ultimately reset your body’s “enzymatic machinery” to burn fat as its primary fuel source Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Low-carb Athlete Podcast

Ketosis Vs. Low-carb Athlete Podcast

In this episode Coach Brock rejoins Debbie with an ongoing conversation topic... do endurance athletes need to be in ketosis to get the benefits of burning fat? Debbie and Brock chat in the first part of this episode about fat adapted vs. ketosis for endurance athletes. The second part is a quick chat with the Ketogenic Guru- Maria Emmerich as she sits outside in Maui and soaks up her last few days of fun in the sun! Mark Sisson said it best in one of his blog posts (link below) - A quick note about ketosis: Fat-adaption does not necessarily mean ketosis. Ketosis is ketosis. Fat-adaption describes the ability to burn both fat directly via beta-oxidation and glucose via glycolysis, while ketosis describes the use of fat-derived ketone bodies by tissues (like parts of the brain) that normally use glucose. A ketogenic diet “tells” your body that no or very little glucose is available in the environment. The result? “Impaired” glucose tolerance and “physiological” insulin resistance, which sound like negatives but are actually necessary to spare what little glucose exists for use in the brain. On the other hand, a well-constructed, lower-carb (but not full-blown ketogenic) Primal way of eating that leads to weight loss generally improves insulin sensitivity. Here are some links Brock and Debbie discuss: This is the Low Carb vs Low Fat article Brock mentioned: And make sure to check out: Continue reading >>

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

Bulletproof Vs. Paleo Vs. Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets: What’s The Difference?

I was in my 20s when I started suffering from severe fatigue and cognitive dysfunction. I was 300 pounds, sick constantly, and almost had to drop out of grad school because I couldn’t concentrate. Back then, I thought my inability to think clearly and perform at high levels was some sort of moral failing. I would beat myself up. I would work harder and stay up later, trying to catch up with my peers. I tried every diet imaginable, including raw vegan and years of falling off the low-fat bandwagon. I hit the treadmill for hours every day. Nothing worked. So I took matters into my own hands. The Bulletproof Diet was born after a decade of working with some of the world’s top health and nutrition researchers. Over a span of about 15 years, I devoured thousands of research papers and books on human nutrition. I used my body as a testing ground to determine what worked best for my biology. The result is a diet that has helped thousands of people lose fat and gain the energy and clarity they thought they’d lost forever. So, what differentiates the Bulletproof Diet from other low-carb diets? Read on to find out. For an in-depth plan on how to boost energy and increase brain function in just two weeks, get your copy of Head Strong. Bulletproof vs. Paleo: The Big Picture If you were to map out the most popular diets, you’d see a vast spectrum of practices and plans ranging from low-fat vegan to high-fat, low-carb (HFLC). This deliciously fatty end of the spectrum is where the Bulletproof Diet and the Primal, Paleo, and Atkins diets would lie. The Paleo diet eliminates processed foods and focuses on what our paleolithic ancestors ate – mostly meat, plants, nuts, and seeds. The Bulletproof Diet is similar but designed to maximize your willpower by reducing cravings and m Continue reading >>

Atkins Vs. Keto: Difference Between The Two Low-carb Diets

Atkins Vs. Keto: Difference Between The Two Low-carb Diets

Credit: Pixabay Whether you need to reduce weight for medical reasons, or you are the health-conscious type who wants to watch and manage your weight to prevent any related health issues, chances are that you have been advised to follow a certain type of diet. Either a ketogenic (keto) one or the Atkins diet. While both are low-carb diets, the differences between the two are key to understanding which one will work best for you. We put them side-by-side to give you a comparative analysis of the ketogenic diet vs. Atkins diet, and how they stack up on these factors. Ketogenic Diet vs. Atkins Diet: How the Two Diets Work Well, like most diets, it involves eating certain things and refraining from eating certain things. A keto diet includes having low-carb, high-fat foods that help our body to go into a state of ketosis. This is a natural process during which our body produces ketones from the liver fats to be used as the energy we need. When we have a normal high-carb diet, most of our energy comes from the glucose content in the carb-rich diet. This means that the fats we consume are stored away and left unused. The idea of the ketogenic diet is to use this stored fat, and enter into a metabolic state in which the fats in the body get converted into energy. Thus, using the body fat instead of storing it, and possibly helping to reduce weight. The basic thing about the ketogenic diet is that it gets the body burning fats for fuel instead of carbohydrates (when followed properly). Here’s How the Ketogenic Diet Works: When an average human being consumes a high-carb meal, our body converts these carbs to glucose for fuel. Insulin then helps to move that glucose into the main bloodstream. However, when on a keto diet, things are different. The carbohydrate intake is either Continue reading >>

Pilot 12-week Weight-loss Comparison: Low-fat Versus Low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) Diets

Pilot 12-week Weight-loss Comparison: Low-fat Versus Low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) Diets

The following summarizes information presented at multiple conferences on a pilot study conducted by Greene et al. This information was written by Atkins professionals. Obesity Research Greene, P., Willett, W., Devecis, J., et al., "Pilot 12-Week Feeding Weight-Loss Comparison: Low-Fat vs Low-Carbohydrate (Ketogenic) Diets," Abstract Presented at The North American Association for the Study of Obesity Annual Meeting 2003, Obesity Research, 11S, 2003, page 95OR. Greene, P.J., Devecis, J., Willett, W.C., "Effects of Low-Fat Vs Ultra-Low-Carbohydrate Weight-Loss Diets: A 12-Week Pilot Feeding Study," abstract presented at Nutrition Week 2004, February 9-12, 2004, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Summary: BACKGROUND: Some researchers claim that people only lose weight on very low carb diets due to a reduction in calorie intake. Others have argued that very low carb diets offer a “metabolic advantage” allowing people to lose weight without restricting calories. The objective of this study was to evaluate if people who follow very low carb diets lose weight only due to restricting calories. METHOD: Twenty-one participants were recruited and were randomly assigned to three separate diets for 12 weeks: a low fat diet (55% carb, 15% protein, and 30% fat) and two different very low carb diets (both had 5% carb, 30% protein, and 65% fat). The low fat (LF) diet and one of the very low carb (LC1) diets provided a total of 1500 calories a day for women and 1800 calories a day for men. The second very low carb diet group was allowed 300 additional calories a day (1800 calories for women and 2100 calories for men). Meals were provided during the study. RESULTS: After 12 weeks, all participants lost weight. Both the very low carb groups lost more weight than the low fat group (LC1: -23 lbs, LC Continue reading >>

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

Last week, my staff nutritionist Laura Schoenfeld wrote a guest post for my blog called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health”. Perhaps not surprisingly, it has caused quite a stir. For reasons I don’t fully understand, some people identify so strongly with how many carbohydrates they eat that they take offense when a suggestion is made that low-carb diets may not be appropriate for everyone, in all circumstances. In these circles low-carb diets have become dogma (i.e. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true). Followers of this strange religious sect insist that everyone should be on low-carb or even ketogenic diets; that all carbohydrates, regardless of their source, are “toxic”; that most traditional hunter-gatherer (e.g. Paleolithic) societies followed a low-carb diet; and, similarly, that nutritional ketosis—which is only achievable with a very high-fat, low-carb, and low-protein diet—is our default and optimal physiological state. Cut through the confusion and hype and learn what research can tell us about low-carb diets. On the other hand, I’ve also observed somewhat of a backlash against low-carb diets occurring in the blogosphere of late. While I agree with many of the potential issues that have been raised about low-carb diets, and think it’s important to discuss them, I also feel it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that low-carb diets can be very effective therapeutic tools for certain conditions and in certain situations. With this in mind, here are 7 things I think everyone should know about low-carb diets. #1: Paleo does not equal low-carb, and very low-carb/ketogenic diets are not our “default” nutritional state, as some have claimed. Some low-carb advocates have claimed that mo Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto and Paleo are two of the most popular diets of the 21st century. But what’s the difference between them? Which one will help you lose weight? Which one will help you heal your health? A Quick Summary of The Differences Between Keto And Paleo: Focus on Ketone Levels: A Keto diet focuses on raising your body’s ketone levels by altering your food choices so you enter a metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. A Paleo diet doesn’t pay attention to ketone levels. Focus on Food Quality: A Paleo diet focuses strongly on choosing whole foods that are nutrient-dense, high-quality, and free from toxins. A healthy Keto diet should also include high quality food, but this isn’t the emphasis. Amount of Carbs: A Keto diet has a very low carbohydrate intake. While a Paleo diet is certainly lower in carbs than many other diets out there, it typically still has a higher carb intake than a Keto diet. Amount of Fat: A Keto diet puts far greater emphasis on increasing your fat intake than a Paleo diet. Although Paleo does encourage eating healthy fats, it’s not typically as high fat as a Keto diet. This is a very brief explanation of the differences between Keto and Paleo, so please keep reading to discover more about both diets. Want to figure out which diet is best for you? We’ll cover that below… The 4 Main Differences Between A Keto And Paleo Diet: Here’s a more detailed breakdown of the key differences between Keto and Paleo: Keto vs Paleo – Difference #1 – A Keto diet focuses on raising your ketone levels. The Keto diet has one main aim: raising your ketone levels so you reach nutritional ketosis. If you’re new to all this, then ketosis might be a bit confusing. So let me explain… What are ketones? Ketones (or ketone bodies) are naturally produced by y Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Keto & Low-carb Diets

The Difference Between Keto & Low-carb Diets

By Myprotein Writer | Shaun Chapman The Ketogenic Diet or – Keto Diet – limits carbohydrate intake to around 50g per day or 5% energy intake – whereas a low-carb diet has no definition. Personal perceptions of low carb may be completely different to another person’s. In fact, on a ketogenic diet, the macronutrient content would be similar to like 5% carbs, 15% protein and 80% fat. This is according what we are currently giving people for a research study we are running at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge. This is the key difference between going keto and low carb, as this very limited amount of carbohydrate depletes the body and brain of glucose. This is where “keto-adaption” takes place and the body shifts away from carbohydrate metabolism and towards predominantly fat metabolism both at rest and during exercise. However, the central nervous system and brain cannot do this as fatty acids cannot cross the blood-brain barrier and therefore the increase of blood ketones (b-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone) reaches concentrations of 2mmol/l or more. This is why for the first few days on the diet you may feel tired, lethargic and lacking concentration. Ketosis & Ketones Ketone bodies are a major source of energy during periods of fasting or severe carbohydrate restriction (<50g) per day and are produced mainly in the liver. Originally thought of as just a metabolite; ketones may serve an important role linked with the increase of particular enzymes regulating endurance training adaptations. In addition, ketones may even play a role in influencing food intake control by affecting specific parts of the brain that regulate this (the hypothalamus) as well as the way they interact with hunger regulating hormones such as ghrelin. A carbohydrate intake grea Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Atkins Diet

Keto Vs Atkins Diet

The Keto vs Atkins debate has been raging for years with neither able to establish a clear advantage in the eyes of the public. Both have their passionate advocates and equally ardent detractors so trying to find a definitive answer to which is better can be challenging. Much of the confusion regarding which low carb diet is better centered on the fact that there is a significant amount of overlap between the two diets. But while the overlay is real there are genuine differences as well. Below we’re going to take a close look at both the similarities and the differences between the diets. First a brief overview of each. The Atkins Diet is often called the "Atkins ketosis diet", which you eat as much fat and protein as possible while avoiding foods that are high in carbs. This process has been known to work for many people along with medical proof from proven professionals. The Atkins diet has been highly popularized and it consists of 4 different phases: The Keto diet (read about it in-depth here) was developed nearly a century ago. Like the Atkins diet that came after it (and borrowed from it) this diet relies on drastically reducing carbohydrate intake and entering ketosis where the body is burning fat for energy. There are several accepted variations of the diet: The following table presents a side by side comparison of known issues with the 2 diets so you can better understand the important ways in which they differ. Possible Issue Atkins Keto Carbohydrate Levels With Atkins this changes from phase to phase, starting with drastic reductions followed by gradual re-introduction. Fixed level: Approximately 10% of average consumption. Carbohydrate Monitoring Method Net carbohydrates Total carbohydrates Protein Intake Three 4 to 6 ounce servings of protein daily. Appro Continue reading >>

The Effect Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet Versus A Low-glycemic Index Diet On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The Effect Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet Versus A Low-glycemic Index Diet On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (<20 g of carbohydrate daily; LCKD) or a low-glycemic, reduced-calorie diet (500 kcal/day deficit from weight maintenance diet; LGID). Both groups received group meetings, nutritional supplementation, and an exercise recommendation. The main outcome was glycemic control, measured by hemoglobin A1c. Forty-nine (58.3%) participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03), body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p < 0.001) compared to the LGID group. Diabetes medications were reduced or eliminated in 95.2% of LCKD vs. 62% of LGID participants (p < 0.01). Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in motivated volunteers with type 2 diabetes. The diet lower in carbohydrate led to greater improvements in glycemic control, and more frequent medication reduction/elimination than the low glycemic index diet. Lifestyle modification using low carbohydrate interventions is effective for improving and reversing type 2 diabetes. Effect of diet programs on indices of glycemic Continue reading >>

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