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Ketosis Vs Low Carb

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Keto & Low-carb Diets

The Difference Between Keto & Low-carb Diets

By Myprotein Writer | Shaun Chapman The Ketogenic Diet or – Keto Diet – limits carbohydrate intake to around 50g per day or 5% energy intake – whereas a low-carb diet has no definition. Personal perceptions of low carb may be completely different to another person’s. In fact, on a ketogenic diet, the macronutrient content would be similar to like 5% carbs, 15% protein and 80% fat. This is according what we are currently giving people for a research study we are running at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge. This is the key difference between going keto and low carb, as this very limited amount of carbohydrate depletes the body and brain of glucose. This is where “keto-adaption” takes place and the body shifts away from carbohydrate metabolism and towards predominantly fat metabolism both at rest and during exercise. However, the central nervous system and brain cannot do this as fatty acids cannot cross the blood-brain barrier and therefore the increase of blood ketones (b-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone) reaches concentrations of 2mmol/l or more. This is why for the first few days on the diet you may feel tired, lethargic and lacking concentration. Ketosis & Ketones Ketone bodies are a major source of energy during periods of fasting or severe carbohydrate restriction (<50g) per day and are produced mainly in the liver. Originally thought of as just a metabolite; ketones may serve an important role linked with the increase of particular enzymes regulating endurance training adaptations. In addition, ketones may even play a role in influencing food intake control by affecting specific parts of the brain that regulate this (the hypothalamus) as well as the way they interact with hunger regulating hormones such as ghrelin. A carbohydrate intake grea Continue reading >>

Atkins Vs. Keto: Difference Between The Two Low-carb Diets

Atkins Vs. Keto: Difference Between The Two Low-carb Diets

Credit: Pixabay Whether you need to reduce weight for medical reasons, or you are the health-conscious type who wants to watch and manage your weight to prevent any related health issues, chances are that you have been advised to follow a certain type of diet. Either a ketogenic (keto) one or the Atkins diet. While both are low-carb diets, the differences between the two are key to understanding which one will work best for you. We put them side-by-side to give you a comparative analysis of the ketogenic diet vs. Atkins diet, and how they stack up on these factors. Ketogenic Diet vs. Atkins Diet: How the Two Diets Work Well, like most diets, it involves eating certain things and refraining from eating certain things. A keto diet includes having low-carb, high-fat foods that help our body to go into a state of ketosis. This is a natural process during which our body produces ketones from the liver fats to be used as the energy we need. When we have a normal high-carb diet, most of our energy comes from the glucose content in the carb-rich diet. This means that the fats we consume are stored away and left unused. The idea of the ketogenic diet is to use this stored fat, and enter into a metabolic state in which the fats in the body get converted into energy. Thus, using the body fat instead of storing it, and possibly helping to reduce weight. The basic thing about the ketogenic diet is that it gets the body burning fats for fuel instead of carbohydrates (when followed properly). Here’s How the Ketogenic Diet Works: When an average human being consumes a high-carb meal, our body converts these carbs to glucose for fuel. Insulin then helps to move that glucose into the main bloodstream. However, when on a keto diet, things are different. The carbohydrate intake is either Continue reading >>

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Low-carbohydrate Diet

Not to be confused with slow carb diet. This article is about low carbohydrate diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss. For low-carbohydrate dietary therapy for epilepsy, see Ketogenic diet. Low-carbohydrate diets or low-carb diets are dietary programs that restrict carbohydrate consumption. Foods high in easily digestible carbohydrates (e.g., sugar, bread, pasta) are limited or replaced with foods containing a higher percentage of fats and moderate protein (e.g., meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, cheese, nuts, and seeds) and other foods low in carbohydrates (e.g., most salad vegetables such as spinach, kale, chard and collards), although other vegetables and fruits (especially berries) are often allowed. The amount of carbohydrate allowed varies with different low-carbohydrate diets.[1] Such diets are sometimes 'ketogenic' (i.e., they restrict carbohydrate intake sufficiently to cause ketosis). The induction phase of the Atkins diet[2][3][4] is ketogenic. The term "low-carbohydrate diet" is generally applied to diets that restrict carbohydrates to less than 20% of caloric intake, but can also refer to diets that simply restrict or limit carbohydrates to less than recommended proportions (generally less than 45% of total energy coming from carbohydrates).[5][6] Definition and classification[edit] Low-carbohydrate diets are not well-defined.[7] The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[8] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[9] Used for Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

Last week, my staff nutritionist Laura Schoenfeld wrote a guest post for my blog called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health”. Perhaps not surprisingly, it has caused quite a stir. For reasons I don’t fully understand, some people identify so strongly with how many carbohydrates they eat that they take offense when a suggestion is made that low-carb diets may not be appropriate for everyone, in all circumstances. In these circles low-carb diets have become dogma (i.e. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true). Followers of this strange religious sect insist that everyone should be on low-carb or even ketogenic diets; that all carbohydrates, regardless of their source, are “toxic”; that most traditional hunter-gatherer (e.g. Paleolithic) societies followed a low-carb diet; and, similarly, that nutritional ketosis—which is only achievable with a very high-fat, low-carb, and low-protein diet—is our default and optimal physiological state. Cut through the confusion and hype and learn what research can tell us about low-carb diets. On the other hand, I’ve also observed somewhat of a backlash against low-carb diets occurring in the blogosphere of late. While I agree with many of the potential issues that have been raised about low-carb diets, and think it’s important to discuss them, I also feel it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that low-carb diets can be very effective therapeutic tools for certain conditions and in certain situations. With this in mind, here are 7 things I think everyone should know about low-carb diets. #1: Paleo does not equal low-carb, and very low-carb/ketogenic diets are not our “default” nutritional state, as some have claimed. Some low-carb advocates have claimed that mo Continue reading >>

Is Ketosis Necessary On A Low-carb Diet? Let’s Ask The Experts!

Is Ketosis Necessary On A Low-carb Diet? Let’s Ask The Experts!

One of the most asked about aspects of livin’ la vida low-carb has got to the issue of ketosis. There is so much misinformation about there about this very natural state that the body goes through when you are on a low-carb diet (primarily confusing it with a serious condition that diabetics must be careful of called ketoacidosis–NOT the same as ketosis). As such, there may be confusion that lingers out there among my readers who are just learning about this way of eating. In this recent blog post where I provided some “quickie one-liner” responses to some e-mails, I made the following statement: Being in ketosis is like being pregnant–you either are or you’re not; regardless of what the Ketosticks show you, if you are eating less than 30g carbohydrates a day, then you ARE in ketosis.? One of my readers named Charles Fred decided to respond to my statement which he disagreed with and it gets to the very heart of this issue about ketosis. Here’s what he wrote: Your statement reflects today?’s informed opinion, but my article in work, ?Unified Physiology of the Metabolic Syndrome,? has given me an unusual perspective which for the sake of brevity I?’ll state dogmatically. Ketosis need not and should not be part of low-carb eating. Low-carb diets should never be labeled as ?ketogenic? diets. Ketosis appears to be an ?Induction? phase of low-carb eating, but in fact it is a last ditch response to inadequate glucose. As such it is either temporary or avoidable. Low-carb eating is the evolution-derived diet of humans (unlike other primates). Humans are carnivores, hunters, because human evolution happened pre-fire and pre-agriculture when very few carbs were edible. For carnivores, gluconeogenesis in the liver supplies all necessary glucose. But if someone a Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs Keto - What's The Difference?

Low Carb Vs Keto - What's The Difference?

Low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets are often confused, perhaps in part because a ketogenic diet is, by default, also a low carbohydrate diet. That said, there are several important distinctions that set ketogenic diets apart from more generic low carbohydrate diets. Let's look a little more closely at each of those distinctions, so you can better understand why someone might wish to pursue a ketogenic diet. So, what's a low-carb diet? Okay, so here's where the greatest confusion generally comes in. A low-carbohydrate diet focuses on limiting carbohydrate intake. A ketogenic diet does the same. So how are they different? The difference is like that between a doctor and a surgeon. The surgeon is still a doctor but may be far more specialized. Keto diets, similarly, are specialized low-carb diets. So let's look at the generic—the low-carb diet—first. First, it's important to note that “low” in this case is pretty subjective. There's no clear consensus on how many carbs one can eat before a diet is no longer low-carbohydrate, for instance. In general, though, the idea here is to be more selective than the standard western diet. Often this means fruits, vegetables, and beans are still acceptable parts of the diet; while grains, baked goods, and processed sugars are either completely eliminated or drastically reduced. As a result of shifting from carbohydrate-dense foods in your diet, to more low-density foods, the daily carbohydrate quantity you intake is significantly cut. The subjectivity of the diet, however, can be problematic. For instance, if you were consuming 300 grams of carbohydrates daily, and cut it to 200 grams per day, this is a lower-carbohydrate diet. If you don't replace the lost calories, you may still lose weight, and technically, you could consi Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Atkins Diet

Keto Vs Atkins Diet

The Keto vs Atkins debate has been raging for years with neither able to establish a clear advantage in the eyes of the public. Both have their passionate advocates and equally ardent detractors so trying to find a definitive answer to which is better can be challenging. Much of the confusion regarding which low carb diet is better centered on the fact that there is a significant amount of overlap between the two diets. But while the overlay is real there are genuine differences as well. Below we’re going to take a close look at both the similarities and the differences between the diets. First a brief overview of each. The Atkins Diet is often called the "Atkins ketosis diet", which you eat as much fat and protein as possible while avoiding foods that are high in carbs. This process has been known to work for many people along with medical proof from proven professionals. The Atkins diet has been highly popularized and it consists of 4 different phases: The Keto diet (read about it in-depth here) was developed nearly a century ago. Like the Atkins diet that came after it (and borrowed from it) this diet relies on drastically reducing carbohydrate intake and entering ketosis where the body is burning fat for energy. There are several accepted variations of the diet: The following table presents a side by side comparison of known issues with the 2 diets so you can better understand the important ways in which they differ. Possible Issue Atkins Keto Carbohydrate Levels With Atkins this changes from phase to phase, starting with drastic reductions followed by gradual re-introduction. Fixed level: Approximately 10% of average consumption. Carbohydrate Monitoring Method Net carbohydrates Total carbohydrates Protein Intake Three 4 to 6 ounce servings of protein daily. Appro Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Low-carb Athlete Podcast

Ketosis Vs. Low-carb Athlete Podcast

In this episode Coach Brock rejoins Debbie with an ongoing conversation topic... do endurance athletes need to be in ketosis to get the benefits of burning fat? Debbie and Brock chat in the first part of this episode about fat adapted vs. ketosis for endurance athletes. The second part is a quick chat with the Ketogenic Guru- Maria Emmerich as she sits outside in Maui and soaks up her last few days of fun in the sun! Mark Sisson said it best in one of his blog posts (link below) - A quick note about ketosis: Fat-adaption does not necessarily mean ketosis. Ketosis is ketosis. Fat-adaption describes the ability to burn both fat directly via beta-oxidation and glucose via glycolysis, while ketosis describes the use of fat-derived ketone bodies by tissues (like parts of the brain) that normally use glucose. A ketogenic diet “tells” your body that no or very little glucose is available in the environment. The result? “Impaired” glucose tolerance and “physiological” insulin resistance, which sound like negatives but are actually necessary to spare what little glucose exists for use in the brain. On the other hand, a well-constructed, lower-carb (but not full-blown ketogenic) Primal way of eating that leads to weight loss generally improves insulin sensitivity. Here are some links Brock and Debbie discuss: This is the Low Carb vs Low Fat article Brock mentioned: And make sure to check out: Continue reading >>

Reddit Low Carb Vs Keto

Reddit Low Carb Vs Keto

Skip to content (recipe in comments): www.reddit.com/ Keto Vs Paleo Reddit . kristafb. I was just at Reddit keto. Vegetables are an essential part of a healthy low-carb ... Below youll find a quick visual guide on the best (and worst) low-carb vegetables for keto. It may be overkill, but theres science to support this extremely low-carb diet. With minimal carbohydrate intake, I was just at Reddit keto. Reddit Low-Carb Recipes for the Keto Diet. Keto Bars are the only high fat, low carb ketogenic diet bar. SHARE THIS PAGE CLOSE. On /r/keto: [FP] Carne Asada Normal vs Abnormal ... On /r/keto: Okay, seriously. There are many possible drawbacks of low-carb diets compared to ketogenic diets. 3.3K 1.3K Tweet. I was wondering if there are any advantages to staying Keto for the long haul? Shares 4K. The Caveman Keto website is supported by fans like you; consider making a donation! Question about dietary fat vs body fat. Can anyone help with finding carb count for Burger Jones? The dangers of going on a unique protein diet are great. Here it is, plus how to transition if you think you want to. Wondering about the difference between low-carb/keto diets and Paleo? *if you don't like meat or dairy, don't watch this video. The Best and Worst Low Carb Sweeteners. Reddit Keto. Keto Bars are made with love and the quality ingredients keto dieters are looking for. ... total carbs vs net carbs, ... keto, low carb, and paleo marinara or pizza sauce. Low Carb Garlic Butter Pork Chops. How to Get Started with Low Carb / Keto. Want low carb products delivered to your door? Keto reddit. Check out some of the yummy things subscribers get in this Keto Krate review of the January 2017 box. Low Carb High Fat Diet Athletic Performance ... Low Carb VS Keto?!? How to Get Started with Low Carb / Ket Continue reading >>

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A keto or ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many proven benefits for weight loss, health and performance, as millions of people have experienced already. 1 Here you’ll learn how to eat a keto diet based on real foods. You’ll find visual guides, recipes, meal plans and a simple 2-week get started program, all you need to succeed on keto. Get even more, custom meal plans, ask the experts and low-carb TV, with a free trial. 1. Introduction: What is ketosis? The “keto” in a ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”. 2 This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then used as fuel throughout the body, including the brain. The brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day, 3 and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose… or ketones. On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low, and fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is obviously great if you’re trying to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, such as less hunger and a steady supply of energy. When the body produces ketones, it’s said to be in ketosis. The fastest way to get there is by fasting – not eating anything – but nobody can fast forever. A keto diet, on the other hand, can be eaten indefinite Continue reading >>

Staying In Ketosis Vs. Carb Cycling

Staying In Ketosis Vs. Carb Cycling

Many people struggle, sometimes for years, to lose stored fat and lower body weight. One of the biggest problems with low-calorie and even low-fat diets is that they can cause the dieter to lose weight indiscriminately, reducing fat, muscle and water weight. A ketogenic diet, a type of very low-carb eating plan, attempts to fight this problem by causing the body to lose fat while maintaining or building muscle mass. A carb cycling diet attempts to reduce some of the side effects of a ketogenic diet through limited carbohydrate intake. Video of the Day Nearly all the carbohydrates must be removed from the human body to put it into ketosis. When there are no carbohydrates left in the diet, the body relies on stored carbohydrates for energy. Once all of the stored carbohydrates are used up, the body switches to using fat stores for energy. Entering ketosis can be a difficult process for the dieter. The first couple of days on a ketogenic diet, or a diet designed to induce ketosis, often result in lethargy and muscle fatigue. It is only after you've reached ketosis that your body achieves a sort of equilibrium and the fatigue fades. However, staying in this ketosis phase is very difficult. If you eat carbohydrates, your body leaves ketosis and the initial phase must start over again. A carb cycling diet is designed to help to reduce some of the negative effects of a ketogenic diet by allowing the body to replenish its carbohydrate stores on a periodic basis. During the carb depletion phase of the diet, the dieter reduces carb intake to almost nothing, and focuses on workouts that deplete the carbohydrate stores more quickly. Then the dieter eats a specified set of carbs to refill the body's carbohydrate stores; this is called a re-feed or carbo load. This gives the dieter t Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

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