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Ketosis Urine

Overview Of Ketosis In Cattle

Overview Of Ketosis In Cattle

(Acetonemia, Ketonemia) By Thomas H. Herdt, DVM, MS, DACVN, DACVIM, Professor, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health, Michigan State University Ketosis is a common disease of adult cattle. It typically occurs in dairy cows in early lactation and is most consistently characterized by partial anorexia and depression. Rarely, it occurs in cattle in late gestation, at which time it resembles pregnancy toxemia of ewes (see Pregnancy Toxemia in Ewes and Does). In addition to inappetence, signs of nervous dysfunction, including pica, abnormal licking, incoordination and abnormal gait, bellowing, and aggression, are occasionally seen. The condition is worldwide in distribution but is most common where dairy cows are bred and managed for high production. Etiology and Pathogenesis: The pathogenesis of bovine ketosis is incompletely understood, but it requires the combination of intense adipose mobilization and a high glucose demand. Both of these conditions are present in early lactation, at which time negative energy balance leads to adipose mobilization, and milk synthesis creates a high glucose demand. Adipose mobilization is accompanied by high blood serum concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs). During periods of intense gluconeogenesis, a large portion of serum NEFAs is directed to ketone body synthesis in the liver. Thus, the clinicopathologic characterization of ketosis includes high serum concentrations of NEFAs and ketone bodies and low concentrations of glucose. In contrast to many other species, cattle with hyperketonemia do not have concurrent acidemia. The serum ketone bodies are acetone, acetoacetate, and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). There is speculation that the pathogenesis of ketosis cases oc Continue reading >>

Ketosis Plan

Ketosis Plan

What Is A Ketosis Plan? Are you considering going on a ketosis plan? Under a ketosis plan, the goal is for your body to use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates which is the usual fuel that the body uses. This is one of the biggest things attributed to the weight loss success that people see when they go on a weight loss diet like the Atkins diet or the Dukan diet. Ketosis works for weight loss because when the body is using fat that it has stored for energy, that “storage space” within the body gets smaller and smaller resulting in weight loss. How Does Ketosis Work? Our bodies first turn to carbohydrates for fuel. If there are no carbohydrates to burn for energy, our bodies turn to our fat for fuel. In the process of our bodies breaking down our fat for energy, ketones are produced. If this continues, it generates a high level of ketones in our blood, resulting in a state called ketosis. There are certain muscles in the body that actually prefer ketones over carbohydrates (glucose) when it comes to fuel. A couple of the biggest of those muscles are the heart and the kidneys. Even the brain can use ketones for their energy needs. Some diet plans like the Atkins diet encourage the monitoring of ketones within the body by using testing strips to test urine. Acetone, which is a particular type of ketone, is not usable by the body so it is expelled as waste. This is the ketone that is detected in the urine with the help of these testing strips. Again when a large number of ketones are found present in the body, it is referred to as ketosis. Is A Ketosis Plan Safe? Experts cannot agree on whether a ketosis plan is safe or not. Some claim ketosis may harm the kidney and other organs. Others claim that historically human beings were hunter-gatherers and lived primarily Continue reading >>

Is Being In Ketosis Safe And What Are The Potential Side Effects

Is Being In Ketosis Safe And What Are The Potential Side Effects

Sign up for updates to receive one week FREE of my low carb and gluten free meal plans: CHECK OUT SOME OF MY OTHER FAVORITE LOW CARB KETO RESOURCES: Is being in ketosis safe? Some people think that ketosis is extremely dangerous. However, they might be confusing ketosis with ketoacidosis, which is completely different. While ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a natural metabolic state. In fact, ketosis and ketogenic diets have been studied extensively and shown to have major benefits for weight loss (1, 2). Ketogenic diets have also been shown to have therapeutic effects in epilepsy, type 2 diabetes and several other chronic conditions (3, 4, 5, 6). Ketosis is generally considered to be safe for most people. However, it may lead to a few side effects, especially in the beginning. An Overview of Ketosis First, it’s necessary to understand what ketosis is. Ketosis is a natural part of metabolism. It happens either when carbohydrate intake is very low (such as on a ketogenic diet), or when you haven’t eaten for a long time. Both of these lead to reduced insulin levels, which causes a lot of fat to be released from your fat cells. When this happens, the liver gets flooded with fat, which turns a large part of it into ketones. During ketosis, many parts of your body are burning ketones for energy instead of carbs. This includes a large part of the brain. However, this doesn’t happen instantly. It takes your body and brain some time to “adapt” to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. During this adaptation phase, you may experience some temporary side effects. These are generally referred to as the “low-carb flu” or “keto flu.” Bottom Line: In ketosis, parts of the body and brain use ketones for fuel instead o Continue reading >>

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

How To Know If You Are In Ketosis Without Strips.

How To Know If You Are In Ketosis Without Strips.

To know whether or not you’ve entered ketosis you can measure your blood ketone levels. But how to know if you are in ketosis without strips? Well, we’re already mildly ketogenic after an overnight fast. Once our liver glycogen stores have been depleted we begin to produce ketone bodies at an exponential rate. Despite that, it doesn’t mean that we’ll be utilizing them efficiently. If we’re not adapted, then our brain and muscles won’t be able to put those ketones into use. Nutritional ketosis begins if our blood ketone levels are over 0.5mMol. To indicate that, you can use either urine strips like Ketostix. There are also breath takers. The most optimal range for ketosis is between 0.5 and 3 mMol. Ketoacidosis occurs over 10mMol, which is quite hard to reach. It usually happens with people who are diabetic or after excessive alcohol consumption. But there are a few problems with measuring ketones. Having elevated levels of ketones doesn’t mean you’re in ketosis. These urine strips are expensive and taking several measurements a day is very costly. That’s why there’s another way how to know you’re in ketosis without strips. Like said, elevated ketone levels doesn’t necessarily mean ketosis. It might even be the opposite. If we’re not putting ketones into use, then we’re probably urinating it out. That’s why urine strips are not ideal. What we want to know as well is our blood sugar levels. Glucose and ketones are contradicting fuel sources. If one is elevated, then the other has to be decreased. If we have high blood sugar levels, then we won’t be able to use fat for fuel. We definitely won’t be in ketosis. Quantifying is great because it gives us an accurate interpretation of our condition. However, we shouldn’t get stuck with the dat Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

One of the reasons The Bulletproof Diet with Bulletproof Coffee works so well for people looking to lose weight is that Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting helps your body to more easily enter a state called cyclical ketosis, which is great for a whole bunch of reasons. Ketosis is a cornerstone of becoming Bulletproof; listen to these recent Bulletproof Radio episodes with ketosis experts Jimmy Moore and Dominic D’Agostino to get the scoop on how and why it works. It’s what happens when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar for energy, and it only happens when you eat almost no carbohydrates, or when you hack it using certain kinds of oils. Many people first stumble upon the idea of ketosis while looking for a weight loss strategy. That can be a major part of it for so many people out there who have tried just about every other diet out there but haven’t seen the results they’d hoped for. But when people experience the mental clarity and focus that ketosis brings, the game changes! This post walks you through one of the most important yet underrated mechanisms that makes ketosis so effective for people who have tried everything else to lose weight and failed to keep it off: appetite suppression. Ketosis works for weight loss in the short term, but that’s not why it’s so amazing. Short term weight loss is easy (I’ve lost at least 200 pounds of short term weight…because it always roared back on with a vengeance so I could lose it again!) When you look at keeping your weight off forever, ketosis provides a level of appetite suppression that is actually liberating. Ketosis helps you literally stop thinking about food all the time. Why Calorie Counting Is So Ineffective One of the reasons old-fashioned, calorie-restricted diets tend to fail is becau Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

(diet Review) Pruvit Keto/os Exogenous Ketones: Ketosis Or Not?

(diet Review) Pruvit Keto/os Exogenous Ketones: Ketosis Or Not?

I’ve gotten a crazy number of requests do this Pruvit Keto/OS review. Keto/OS is a new exogenous ketone supplement that people are using to lose weight, among other things. I found very little in terms of research on exogenous ketones in humans. Exogenous ketones have been studied a bit in rats, and no one has studied them in terms of weight loss in people or in rodents. The product Keto/OS has no research behind it either, so I decided to bite the bullet and put myself on it for a week to see what would happen. I hate using small studies as proof for anything, but in this case, I had no choice. It was totally an n=1. I also hate drinking disgusting things, but again, in this case I had no choice. Sigh. Before I talk about how that all went, let’s chat about ketones and how they work in your body. What are ketones? Ketones are the byproduct of fat metabolism. When you deprive your body of it’s favorite source of energy – glucose – it starts burning your fat for fuel. That’s the premise of the ketogenic diet: burn fat, use the ketones that result as energy. Staying on the ketogenic diet is tough for most people, but it can be done, and for most healthy people, it’s probably not harmful. Check with your doctor or dietitian before starting any diet. Read my ketogenic diet review here. The issue with ketosis for weight loss is that when you break ketosis, the weight will probably come back on. If you’re a person who lives to eat and not eats to live, it might not be the best weight-loss option for you. Because a ketogenic diet is so difficult for most people to maintain, Pruvit is marketing Keto/OS by saying that you can eat a normal diet, drink Keto/OS, still go into ketosis, and lose weight when your body burns fat for energy from being in ‘ketosis’ fr Continue reading >>

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Go to: Methods The KetoPerformance study with its before-and-after comparison design was registered at germanctr.de as DRKS00009605 and took place from February to June 2016. Exclusion criteria included underweight, obesity, kidney stones, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and any fatty acid-metabolism disorders. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Commission of the Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg (494/14) and all subjects signed a written consent form. Twelve of the 42 subjects from the KetoPerformance study could be recruited for the present substudy. Experimental design and dietary intervention The experimental intervention consisted of a KD without caloric restriction lasting 6 weeks with a previous preparation period including detailed instructions during teaching classes and individual counselling by a dietitian. The subjects were free to follow a KD according to their personal preferences but were advised to reach a ratio by weight of approximately 1.8:1 fat to carbohydrate and protein combined, yielding a diet with 80, 15, and 5 % of total energy intake from fat, protein and carbohydrate, respectively. During the KD intervention's sixth week, our substudy subjects were instructed to measure urine and blood ketone concentrations at regular intervals in as close proximity as possible during a 24-h period from 07:00 to 07:00 in the morning. During the day (07:00 till 22:00) blood and urinary ketones were measured every full hour and every three hours, respectively. During the night, blood and urinary ketones were measured once at 03:00. In total blood and urine and ketones were measured 18 and 8 times, respectively, and were recorded in a table sheet. Subjects were asked to drink 400 ml of water every 3 h during the day to ensure sufficient urination and to Continue reading >>

Comparing The Urine Ketone Strip Test And The Handheld Ketone Meter To Diagnose Ketosis In Early Lactation Dairy Cows1

Comparing The Urine Ketone Strip Test And The Handheld Ketone Meter To Diagnose Ketosis In Early Lactation Dairy Cows1

Introduction Ketosis is a common metabolic disease in fresh dairy cows. Clinical and subclinical ketosis (SCK) can cause reduced milk yield, decreased milk protein, reduced reproductive capacity, and increased risk of displaced abomasum. Subclinical ketosis may be present in 30%–50% of early lactation cows in some herds (Divers and Peek 2008). Subclinical ketosis in dairy cattle is defined as an excess level of circulating ketone bodies in the absence of the clinical signs of ketosis (Andersson 1988). Ketosis occurs in early lactation because of the drop in blood glucose levels, which leads to a high degree of fatty acids mobilization in the form of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). The NEFA are then oxidized by the liver, leading to ketone body production, namely acetone, acetoacetate, and ß-Hydroxybutyrate (BHBA). Treatment for clinical ketosis or SCK is aimed at restoring glucose levels by administration of glucose i.v., glucocorticoids i.v., and propylene glycol orally or combinations. Usually, diagnosing ketosis is performed by measuring acetoacetate or BHBA levels in the blood, urine, or milk samples. The threshold for BHBA levels in the blood or urine samples to classify cows as having SCK ranges from ≥ 1.0 millimoles/liter (Ospina et al. 2010) to ≥ 1.4 mmol/L (Duffield et al. 2009), with most using ≥ 1.2 mmol/L (McArt et al. 2011; Oetzel 2004). Cows are classified as having clinical ketosis if BHBA concentration is ≥ 3.0 mmol/L (McArt et al. 2011; Oetzel 2004). Converting the BHBA measurement from mmol/L to mg/dL is done by multiplying the measurement in mmol/L by 10 (10.4 to be precise; American Medical Association 2004). Measuring BHBA in serum or plasma is considered the gold standard diagnostic test for subclinical ketosis, because this method has Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

Color Of Urine Strips For Ketosis

Color Of Urine Strips For Ketosis

Ketosis occurs when the body runs out of carbohydrates for energy. As a result, the body begins to process dietary and bodily fat to carry out necessary functions; the presence of ketones in urine thus indicates the metabolism of fat. Ketone testing strips evaluate the presence and concentration of ketones using a urine sample. Ketosis is evidenced by the a chemical reaction on the testing pad, which will change colors based on the concentration of ketones. Presence of Ketones The presence of ketones in urine may be surmised by a simple urinary test. Some test strips offer further evaluation of the presence of glucose, proteins or other material in urine. However, in testing for ketosis, strips need only to test for the presence of ketones. Use of Test Strip Urinary ketone test strips (or reagent strips) are simple to use. The testing pad, on one end of the test strip, is exposed to urine; it can be passed through a urine stream or dipped into a urine specimen. The testing pad contains a chemical that reacts in the presence of ketones, changing color depending on concentration. Ketone Readings For utmost accuracy, ketone readings should be conducted exactly 15 seconds after exposure to urine. On the testing bottle will be a small selection of colored squares demonstrating (in ascending order) what colors the test pad will turn in the event that ketones are present. Test Strip Readings Ketone test strips generally have five categories associated with ketone concentration in blood. A negative reading indicates no ketones are present in urine. Trace (5 mg/dL), small (15 mg/dL), moderate (40 mg/dL) and large (80 to 100-plus mg/dL) are the four positive ranges, indicated by a pale pink (trace) through deep burgundy (large) color on the test pad. Accuracy The testing pad may Continue reading >>

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