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Ketosis Symptoms Urine Color

How To Detect Ketosis

How To Detect Ketosis

How can you tell if your low-carbing efforts have been effective enough to induce ketosis? Learn how to check your ketones! The state of ketosis The state of ketosis means that the body has switched from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. This means not only dietary fats (olive oil, guacamole, deep-fried pig ears), but also all the jiggly bits around your waist — clearly a desirable state for anyone looking to shed extra weight. When the body metabolizes fat, it generates molecules called ketones (also known as ketone bodies). As you restrict carbohydrate intake and amp up the dietary fat, more fat is metabolized and a greater quantity of ketones are created. Most of the cells in your body — including those in your brain — are able to use ketones for energy, although many people experience a few days’ adjustment period, often called the low carb flu. One of the varieties of ketones generated — acetone — cannot be used by the body and is excreted as waste, mostly in the urine and the breath. Conveniently, this makes it very simple to measure whether or not you are in ketosis. Upon entering ketosis, some people report a distinct change in the smell of their breath as a result of the extra released acetone. It could be “fruity” — it’s been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic.” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you’re in ketosis. The unusual smell isn’t anything dangerous, but it could be annoying. Drinking plenty of water should help, or get yourself some sugar-free gum. Most people report “keto-breath” diminishing after the first few weeks. Detecting ketones in urine The more accurate way — and the one we recommend — to check f Continue reading >>

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

Is There A Dark Side Of Ketosis?

I can’t remember what appetizer she pointed to, but the woman sitting to the left of me said this so casually, and several folks at the table knew exactly what she meant, confirming what I’d long suspected: Ketogenic diets have officially gone mainstream – or recognizable at a party mainstream at least – in 2017. Let’s back up and demystify ketosis, which simply means you’re utilizing ketone bodies – more commonly called ketones – rather than glucose as your body’s primary fuel. Just like your car uses gasoline, your body needs fuel. That usually means glucose. But let’s say you’re on a very-low carbohydrate, higher-fat diet. Your body doesn’t get a lot of glucose, which primarily comes from carbohydrate and to a lesser degree protein. That means your liver’s backup glucose (glycogen) also becomes in short supply. Unlike your car, your body doesn’t just shut down. Thankfully, you have an alternative fuel source called ketones. Ketones are organic compounds your liver always makes. You’re cranking out ketones right now as you read this. During starvation or (more likely) when you restrict carbohydrate and increase fat intake, your body uses ketones as its primary fuel. In other words, when your body doesn’t receive or can’t make enough glucose, it shifts to this alternative fuel. Almost every organ can utilize ketones except for your red blood cells (which don’t have ketone-metabolizing mitochondria) and liver. Your liver, in fact, does the heavy lifting. This hardworking organ metabolizes fat into three ketone bodies: acetoacetate (ACA), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetone.(1) BHB is the first substrate that kicks ketosis into action. Among its benefits, BHB reduces chronic inflammation and restores healthy inflammation levels. In Continue reading >>

How To Know If You’re In Ketosis: A Guide To Testing Ketone Levels

How To Know If You’re In Ketosis: A Guide To Testing Ketone Levels

Ketosis can be a powerful way to use your metabolism for fat loss, mental output, physical performance as well as many other health benefits. But how do you know if you’re actually in ketosis? As the old adage goes “test, don’t guess” when it comes to your health. In this guide, we’ll show exactly how to test your ketone levels to know if you’re in ketosis so you can make sure you’re getting all of the benefits that ketosis has to offer. There are three primary forms of ketones in your body, acetone, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutryate. Each of these compounds do different things in the metabolism of ketosis and can be tested individually with differing techniques. Not all measurement is created equally, however, and some can be better than others for different purposes or times. The three different ketone bodies can be measured when they spill over into three different areas of your body: your breath, urine or blood. The good news is that all of these ketone level measurements can be done at home, by yourself. You don’t have to go to any lab or use any fancy high tech equipment. Tracking diligently, at least when you’re getting used to ketosis based diets, is important so you know how much you react to different variables like exercise, type and amount of food, and amounts of exogenous ketone supplements. Also, the optimal level of ketones for specific goals can vary per person. Knowing the amount where you thrive in the goal you want to achieve (and consistently checking if you’re hitting that amount) is the fastest way to reach your goals. Testing levels of ketones with urine strips (acetoacetate) One of the ketone bodies, acetoacetate, can be measured directly in the urine if they are in excessive levels. The way metabolic substrates get into Continue reading >>

Mass Spectral Analysis Of Urine Proteomic Profiles Of Dairy Cows Suffering From Clinical Ketosis

Mass Spectral Analysis Of Urine Proteomic Profiles Of Dairy Cows Suffering From Clinical Ketosis

Background: Ketosis is an important metabolic disorder in dairy cows during the transition period. The urine proteomics of ketosis has not been investigated using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Objective: The aim is to determine differences between urine proteomic profiles of healthy cows and those with clinical ketosis, and facilitate studies of the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms that lead to liver pathology in ketosis. Animals and methods: We analyzed the urine samples of 20 cows with clinical ketosis (group 1) and 20 control cows (group 2) using SELDI-TOF-MS. Results: Thirty-nine peptide peaks differed between both groups. Polypeptides corresponding to 26 of these differential peptide peaks were identified using the SWISS-PROT protein database. We found that the peaks of 11 distinct polypeptides from the urine samples of the ketosis group were significantly reduced, compared with those of the control group as based on the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Among these were VGF (non-acronymic) protein, amyloid precursor protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, C1INH, apolipoprotein C-III, cystatin C, transthyretin, hepcidin, human neutrophil peptides, and osteopontin. Conclusion: These proteins may represent novel biomarkers of the metabolic changes that occur in dairy cows with ketosis. Our results will help to better understand the physiological changes and pathogenesis observed in cows with ketosis. Clinical importance: The SELDI-TOF-MS can be used to understand the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of ketosis and identify biomarkers of the disease. Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a metabolic state of the body that comes from consuming a low-carb, moderate protein, & higher-fat diet that forces your body to use KETONES as its energy source. By controlling your intake of these macronutrients, you are essentially draining the body of its common energy source (glucose) and in turn it reacts by creating its own energy source from the fat you have stored. In other words, in the absence of carbs & sugar your body will burn FAT for fuel! Specifically abnormally stored fat which lies within the tummy, hips, thighs, triceps, and face! The problem with sugar & carbohydrates is that is spikes blood glucose, which in turn causes an insulin spike. This insulin spike then causes a "crash" - which leads to hunger, cravings, & the need for more fuel. Some people may reach for more caffeine to get them through the day etc. You typically get glucose from your diet by eating carbohydrates like: Sugar Bread Grains Fruit Starchy Vegetables The excess carbs & sugar people consume on a daily basis, over time, gets stored as fat IF you're not burning it off via strenuous exercise. This has no lead us into an obesity epidemic. Currently 71% of the U.S. is overweight or obese! When you burn off excess glucose as your energy source, it is forced to resort to using the stores you currently have, FAT (i.e. preferred energy source of the body), as a source of energy. As that fat is burned it releases your new energy source into your body (ketones) which are measured in both your bloodstream and urine. A popular term when following a ketogenic lifestyle is called the "Keto Flu". Essentially the first several days are miserable. Current research shows it takes a good 5-7 days before you can achieve a state of nutritional ketosis. This causes many people to quit becau Continue reading >>

Fellow Low-carbs, How Yellow Is Your Urine?

Fellow Low-carbs, How Yellow Is Your Urine?

I'm in Ketosis constantly and I notice that my urine, especially in the morning, is SUPER deep yellow. Like multivitamin-runoff yellow. I hydrate myself at the watering hole (my kitchen) in the morning. I try to sip water or ginger tea throughout the day. Since ketosis is obviously dehydrating (lose all that water weight), I replace lost water by drinking regular filtered water with a pinch of sea salt (my own version of Gatorade) or coconut water. But for the most part, when in ketosis, my pee never really gets as watered down as when I'm not in glycolysis. Continue reading >>

The Low Carbohydrate Or Ketogenic Diet

The Low Carbohydrate Or Ketogenic Diet

The Atkins diet and other low-carbohydrate diets are still popular. Understanding the concepts behind these diets will help you lose weight in a safe, responsible manner and avoid certain pitfalls. Force your body to burn fat On a low-carbohydrate diet, your body is forced into burning its second choice for energy, fat. Normally, your body prefers to use carbohydrate for energy. Any time you eat carbohydrate-rich foods (starch, sweets, bread, etc.), your body first burns the carbohydrate for energy. Excess carbohydrates are then stored as glycogen (a form of sugar in the liver). Once your carbohydrate stores are full, extra carbohydrate is stored as fat. When carbohydrate calories are plentiful, your body never has to use its fat reserves for energy. Only when your carbohydrate intake is limited will your body reluctantly begin to burn fat. The key to dieting success Controlling your appetite is the key to controlling your calorie intake. When dieting, most people can't stand that "starving" feeling and quit after a very short time. Normally, foods are digested and absorbed into the bloodstream, causing an increase in blood sugar, which triggers insulin secretion. Insulin pushes sugar from the bloodstream into your body's cells and liver, and keeps the blood sugar stable. Simple carbohydrates, such as pasta, breads, and most sweets get into the bloodstream too quickly, triggering a large release of insulin from the pancreas. This flood of insulin causes your blood sugar to drop quickly, triggering hunger and stress hormones to bring your sugar back up. If you try to lose weight with a high carbohydrate, low protein, low fat diet, you will constantly be fighting insulin spikes and resulting hunger. Low carbohydrate diet stops insulin spikes A low carbohydrate diet helps Continue reading >>

Oily Urine: Causes And Treatment

Oily Urine: Causes And Treatment

While you may notice a change in the color or smell of your urine, a change in its consistency could also be an indicator of something amiss with your bodily functions. Continue reading to find out what causes oily urine and what it means for your overall health. What causes oily urine There are many factors that can cause your urine to change, but what causes oily urine? Below are the four most common reasons your urine may become oily. Dehydration: Dark yellow or amber colored urine is a telltale sign of dehydration that may be accompanied by an oily consistency. Drinking more water should clear this up; however, if the condition persists, you should contact your doctor. Chyle: This is an oil-like substance that consists of fats and proteins. It is expected that small amounts of chyle will be found in the urine, especially if it has been held in the bladder for a long period of time. If you notice that your urine appears to be exceptionally oily and is accompanied by a frothy or milky consistency, it is important to contact your doctor as this could be the sign of a more serious issue. Ketones: The presence of ketones in the urine can be caused by the metabolism of fats due to the body’s inability to use carbohydrates for energy. This issue occurs in those who have changed their diet to be protein-rich or void of carbohydrates. This may also happen in individuals who have been fasting or endured prolonged starvation, as well as people with uncontrolled diabetes. These ketones can cause the urine to take on an oily appearance that is not considered normal. Vitamins: Oily urine may also be a result of excess vitamin intake. Too much of a good thing is possible, especially in terms of vitamin D, which can result in oily urine. This issue may be fixed by changes to your Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis symptoms are a result of the way the body gets rid of the excess ketone bodies which build up in the blood stream when a person eats a low carb, ketogenic diet. In short, the body has three ways of dealing with excess ketone bodies: First, the muscles liver and brain can burn them for energy in the cells. Second, the body can breathe ketones out through the lungs. And third, the body can flush ketones out through the kidneys and urine. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The ketosis symptoms associated with the benign dietary ketosis caused by eating a low carb, ketogenic diet are not dangerous. They may differ for each individual, with the most common symptoms being: Ketosis breath, which has a fruity odor, and the person in deep ketosis may feel a sort of slight burning in the nose and a slight smell of ammonia. Dry mouth, which is alleviated by drinking more regular tap or bottled water. (Reverse osmosis water will make this worse.) In the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet, most people experience frequent urination followed by fatigue, as insulin levels come down, and the kidneys release extraneous water stores. Minerals such as sodium, magnesium and potassium are also lost with excreted urine, and it is the mineral loss that causes the fatigue. This can be offset by eating more salt, drinking more fluids, and increasing the intake of magnesium and potassium containing foods. (Dairy foods and avocados are high in potassium, and you can drink broth for more sodium.) A slight headache at first which goes away in a few days. This is usually a sign of not getting enough salt. Ketone bodies become detectable in the urine. Ketone bodies are molecu Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Definition, Symptoms, Strips & When Does Ketosis Start?

Ketosis: Definition, Symptoms, Strips & When Does Ketosis Start?

What Is Ketosis? A basic ketosis definition is an increase of ketones in the body caused by a reduction in carbohydrate intake.5 Today, it’s common to hear people talking about “going into ketosis” to lose weight or manage hunger. As one of the latest movements in the health industry, more and more people are looking to achieve this metabolic state. But what does ketosis mean? To explain ketosis, we first need to understand ketones. Ketones are water-soluble molecules produced in the liver. They’re a by-product of the production of glucose (the body’s fuel) from non-carbohydrate sources. In other words, they are produced when the body is short on ready-made fuel.6 Such shortages occur when the body experiences low intake of calories, during extreme exercise, low-carb diets, fasting, or starvation. In some cases, people suffering from alcoholism or poorly treated Type 1 diabetes will have excessive ketone production.6 Ketosis is a normal metabolic process that occurs naturally during short-term periods of fasting, such as sleep. In the body, a small number of ketones are always present in the blood and urine, but are generally undetectable.6 In terms of dieting, ketosis occurs when carbohydrates are severely limited for extended periods of time. The body then turns to stored fatty acids and ketones for fuel.6 This is why it’s popular among people trying to lose weight. How to Get into Ketosis If you are looking to lose weight, it’s important to know how to put your body in ketosis without jeopardizing your health. Fasting will prompt ketosis but is difficult to sustain. Instead, many people follow a ketosis diet. This is a way of eating that severely reduces the intake of carbohydrates. In most cases, carbs make up 5-10% of calories. Protein accounts for 20 Continue reading >>

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver breaks down fat to produce ketones. Ketones, on a ketogenic diet, are the primary fuel source for the body. If you’re new to the ketogenic diet and you still have questions, consider reading our Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Keto > There are three main ways to measure the ketones in your body, all of which have their advantages and disadvantages. The most common ways to measure are: Blood Ketone Meter. Very accurate but the strips are extremely expensive. Breath Ketone Meters. More accurate than the urine strips, but can sometimes vary in accuracy. Cheaper than blood strips in the long-run. Urine Stricks. This will answer the question “Am I in ketosis?” but will not provide an accurate measure of blood ketones. Scroll down to read a more in-depth analysis of each, and what we recommend for you. Measuring Ketones with Urine Sticks Urine sticks will always be the cheapest and easiest way to measure ketosis. For beginners, this should cover everything you need – there is no point in getting more complex blood strips so early on when you are still trying to understand the nuances of a ketogenic diet. Ultimately, keto sticks are very easy to use – you hold the sticks in your urine stream for a few seconds, and within 10-15 seconds you should notice a color change in the strip (if you are in ketosis). The color of the stick typically is measured in red: light pink being low in ketone production and dark purple being high in ketone production. While keto sticks can be ideal for a general answer to the question “Am I in ketosis?”, they aren’t precise with their accuracy. They measure the acetoacetate in your urine, which is an unused ketone by the body. As you get deeper into ketosis and your body adapts, your b Continue reading >>

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

10 Signs And Symptoms That You're In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is a popular, effective way to lose weight and improve health. When followed correctly, this low-carb, high-fat diet will raise blood ketone levels. These provide a new fuel source for your cells, and cause most of the unique health benefits of this diet (1, 2, 3). On a ketogenic diet, your body undergoes many biological adaptions, including a reduction in insulin and increased fat breakdown. When this happens, your liver starts producing large amounts of ketones to supply energy for your brain. However, it can often be hard to know whether you're "in ketosis" or not. Here are 10 common signs and symptoms of ketosis, both positive and negative. People often report bad breath once they reach full ketosis. It's actually a common side effect. Many people on ketogenic diets and similar diets, such as the Atkins diet, report that their breath takes on a fruity smell. This is caused by elevated ketone levels. The specific culprit is acetone, a ketone that exits the body in your urine and breath (4). While this breath may be less than ideal for your social life, it can be a positive sign for your diet. Many ketogenic dieters brush their teeth several times per day, or use sugar-free gum to solve the issue. If you're using gum or other alternatives like sugar-free drinks, check the label for carbs. These may raise your blood sugar levels and reduce ketone levels. The bad breath usually goes away after some time on the diet. It is not a permanent thing. The ketone acetone is partly expelled via your breath, which can cause bad or fruity-smelling breath on a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets, along with normal low-carb diets, are highly effective for losing weight (5, 6). As dozens of weight loss studies have shown, you will likely experience both short- and long Continue reading >>

Blood Ketones

Blood Ketones

On This Site Tests: Urine Ketones (see Urinalysis - The Chemical Exam); Blood Gases; Glucose Tests Elsewhere On The Web Ask a Laboratory Scientist Your questions will be answered by a laboratory scientist as part of a voluntary service provided by one of our partners, the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS). Click on the Contact a Scientist button below to be re-directed to the ASCLS site to complete a request form. If your question relates to this web site and not to a specific lab test, please submit it via our Contact Us page instead. Thank you. Continue reading >>

Dehydration Or Something More? Decoding Your Urine’s Color

Dehydration Or Something More? Decoding Your Urine’s Color

Without costing you a penny, keeping track of the color of your pee is a great way to monitor wellness. Peeking into the toilet bowl after you’ve urinated can give insight into your body’s current state of health. Even though the color of your pee can reveal a wide range of issues, few take advantage of this easily accessible health barometer. According to Thomas Griebling, MD, MPH, vice chair of the urology department at the University of Kansas, “Urine and urinalysis have, for hundreds of years, been one of the ways physicians have looked at health. From a historical view, urinalysis was one of the original windows into what’s happening in the body.” This window is possible because many of the substances circulating in the body, including bacteria, yeast, excess protein and sugar, eventually make their way into the urine. Our urine’s color is one of the oldest and simplest types of urinalysis. The urine can take on most colors of the rainbow. Several yellow hues are most common; however, they are not the only colors that can be normal. Below is a list of the most frequently seen urine colors and accompanying explanations of what that color might imply: Clear or transparent – Clear colored urine usually means you are drinking too many fluids or too much coffee. Diuretics, whether in the form of coffee or medications, force the body to eliminate lots of water. If reducing water and coffee intake still results in transparent pee, discuss this with a physician as it could implicate a kidney problem. Light yellow, straw-colored, yellow or gold – Due to the pigment called urochrome, these types of yellows are ideal, indicating properly functioning kidneys and adequate hydration levels. Bright or fluorescent yellow – This startling color is most likely the Continue reading >>

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