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Ketosis Symptoms Urine Color

Fellow Low-carbs, How Yellow Is Your Urine?

Fellow Low-carbs, How Yellow Is Your Urine?

I'm in Ketosis constantly and I notice that my urine, especially in the morning, is SUPER deep yellow. Like multivitamin-runoff yellow. I hydrate myself at the watering hole (my kitchen) in the morning. I try to sip water or ginger tea throughout the day. Since ketosis is obviously dehydrating (lose all that water weight), I replace lost water by drinking regular filtered water with a pinch of sea salt (my own version of Gatorade) or coconut water. But for the most part, when in ketosis, my pee never really gets as watered down as when I'm not in glycolysis. Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Vs. Ketosis: What's The Difference?

Ketoacidosis Vs. Ketosis: What's The Difference?

You may have heard the term "keto" or ketogenic floating around. So what exactly is ketoacidosis, ketosis and ketones? Here, we break it down for you. "Keto" is derived from the word ketone, a specific class of organic compounds in your body that are produced when your body burns fat instead of carbohydrates. Your body prefers to burn carbohydrates (glucose) for energy. However, if there is not enough glucose to burn, you will start burning fat instead. This process is called ketosis. Ketones circulate in the bloodstream and are used by tissues and muscles for fuel. You will excrete any ketones not used for energy in your urine. Don't Miss: Healthy Low-Carb Recipes Ketosis vs. Ketoacidosis "Ketosis is simply the presence of ketones in the blood," says Staci Freeworth, R.D., C.D.E., professor of nutrition at Bowling Green State University. "This can be caused by periods of energy imbalance, a change in diet, pregnancy or overconsumption of alcohol." Ketosis is a normal response in the body when a healthy person with a balanced diet starts fasting or severely restricting calories or carbohydrates (e.g., the super low-carb ketogenic diet). Ketosis happens when the body senses a state of starvation. Ketoacidosis is when blood levels of ketones are so high that your blood becomes too acidic. "Ketoacidosis is short for diabetic ketoacidosis and occurs in diabetics who do not make insulin or stop taking their prescribed insulin, typically people with type 1 diabetes," Freeworth says. It can lead to a diabetic coma or even death, according to the American Diabetes Association. Insulin helps transport your blood glucose (or blood sugar) to your cells and tissues. People with type 1 diabetes, and some people with type 2 diabetes, have to inject insulin because their bodies do not Continue reading >>

Dka – What You Need To Know

Dka – What You Need To Know

A certified diabetes educator discusses what the condition is, how it can threaten your health, and how to protect yourself. Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q – My doctor told me I needed to do ketone testing. What is it, how is it done and why is it important? A – When you live with diabetes, there’s a lot to juggle. It can be understandable if your eyes glaze over when your physician or diabetes educator mentions ketone testing (another test!), but here’s why you should take this part of your treatment plan seriously: Ketones are acid molecules generated when we burn fat for energy. This isn’t a problem as long as it doesn’t happen in excess. When you flood your body with too many acids, it starts to become toxic. Combined with dehydration and high blood glucose levels, it can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Often, DKA can occur when you’re not able to get enough glucose into your cells to burn as energy, and the body relies almost exclusively on fat for fuel. This can occur for a number of reasons: • Illness and infection (which can cause intense insulin resistance and elevated blood sugar) • A lack of insulin in the body (due to missed injections, spoiled insulin, or poor absorption) • Insulin pump malfunctions (clogs, leaks, air pockets, cannula displacement, prolonged disconnection, failure to prime the tubing, or accidentally erasing the basal settings) This is very different than nutritional ketosis, which is caused by starvation, prolonged fasting, or a severe lack of car Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Note: Ketosis and its symptoms are often confused with diabetic ketoacidosis. However, diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition, where a severe deficiency of insulin, leads to a toxic buildup of blood glucose, accompanied by excessive breakdown of fat and muscle tissues. However, such alarming levels of ketone bodies are not usually seen in healthy individuals. Our body produces energy from the glucose we get from the consumed carbohydrates. But when glucose is not available, the liver produces ketone bodies to provide the body with the required energy. Although ketones are always present in the body, their levels can rise during a period of prolonged fasting. This condition is called ketosis. The most common cause of ketosis is following a low-carb diet. When one switches over from a high-glycemic diet to a low-glycemic diet, their body enters into a stage of ketosis. The body does not immediately start producing ketones, but if carbohydrates are not included in the diet for a long time, say two days or more, the body starts utilizing the energy from its fat stores. The glucose is thus preserved only for dire conditions like preventing protein and muscle breakdown. The initial stage of ketosis is considered relatively harmless. In fact, ketosis has also been deliberately induced through a ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy. However, prolonged ketosis is harmful for the body and is highly discouraged. Symptoms The most common symptoms of ketosis include: Fatigue Dizziness Headache Excessive thirst Nausea accompanied by abdominal pain Problems with sleeping Bad breath Cold hands and feet Metallic, sweet, or fruity taste in the mouth Strong smelling urine Loss of appetite Temporary sense of euphoria Diagnosis A confirmatory urine test can be done to see whether Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

A question a lot of people who start a Ketogenic Diet want to know is, how long does it take to get into ketosis? After all, it is being in a state of ketosis that makes the diet, “ketogenic” in the first place. Being in Ketosis not only supercharges your body to be in an optimal fat-burning zone. It also gives you a longer, sustained energy, enhanced cognition, improved focus and other neuroprotective benefits. The Advantages of Ketosis don’t end there Being on a Ketogenic Diet and having your body rely on fats as its fuel comes with cardiovascular benefits as well. It has been shown that ketosis lowers bad LDL cholesterol while increasing good HDL cholesterol, decreasing a person’s risk of heart disease as well as improving insulin resistance amongst others. There are also studies into the ketogenic diet’s effects on Alzheimers Disease, Bipolar Disorder among others that have shown promising results. The Ketogenic Diet itself was used in the early 1900’s to control epileptic seizures and is still used today for those resistant to seizure medication. But we won’t dive deeply into all of that today. Today we’re going to answer the question, how long does it take to get into ketosis? So, how long does it take to get into Ketosis? Nobody can tell you accurately how long it will take to get into ketosis as the time it takes for your body to start creating ketone bodies varies between individuals. We all have unique metabolisms, varying resistance to insulin, previous diet, and other biological factors that differentiate us from one another. If one were to give a timeframe, it would be safe to say that typically you can expect your body to get into ketosis within a period of 2-10 days if you stick to the recommended macro nutrients. (use our keto calculator Continue reading >>

Mass Spectral Analysis Of Urine Proteomic Profiles Of Dairy Cows Suffering From Clinical Ketosis

Mass Spectral Analysis Of Urine Proteomic Profiles Of Dairy Cows Suffering From Clinical Ketosis

Background: Ketosis is an important metabolic disorder in dairy cows during the transition period. The urine proteomics of ketosis has not been investigated using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Objective: The aim is to determine differences between urine proteomic profiles of healthy cows and those with clinical ketosis, and facilitate studies of the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms that lead to liver pathology in ketosis. Animals and methods: We analyzed the urine samples of 20 cows with clinical ketosis (group 1) and 20 control cows (group 2) using SELDI-TOF-MS. Results: Thirty-nine peptide peaks differed between both groups. Polypeptides corresponding to 26 of these differential peptide peaks were identified using the SWISS-PROT protein database. We found that the peaks of 11 distinct polypeptides from the urine samples of the ketosis group were significantly reduced, compared with those of the control group as based on the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Among these were VGF (non-acronymic) protein, amyloid precursor protein, serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, C1INH, apolipoprotein C-III, cystatin C, transthyretin, hepcidin, human neutrophil peptides, and osteopontin. Conclusion: These proteins may represent novel biomarkers of the metabolic changes that occur in dairy cows with ketosis. Our results will help to better understand the physiological changes and pathogenesis observed in cows with ketosis. Clinical importance: The SELDI-TOF-MS can be used to understand the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of ketosis and identify biomarkers of the disease. Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Generally, ketone concentrations are lower in the morning and higher in the evening. Whatever time you pick to measure ketone levels, make sure to keep it consistent. Also, do not measure your ketone levels right after exercise. Ketone levels tend to be lower while your glucose levels higher so you won't get representative numbers. Keep in mind there are daily fluctuations caused by changes in hormone levels. Don't get discouraged! Another aspect that affects the level of ketones is the amount of fat in your diet. Some of you may show higher concentration of ketones after a high-fat meal. Coconut oil contains MCTs that will help you boost ketones. To easily increase your fat intake on a ketogenic diet, try fat bombs - snacks with at least 80% fat content. Ketone levels tend to be higher after extensive aerobic exercise as your body depletes glycogen stores. Exercise may help you get into ketosis faster. ketogenic "fruity" breath is not pleasant for most people. To avoid this, drink a lot of water, mint tea and make sure you eat foods rich in electrolytes. Avoid too many chewing gums and mints, as it may put you out of ketosis; there may be hidden carbs affecting your blood sugar. Increase your electrolyte intake, especially potassium. You are likely going to lose some sodium and potassium when switching to the keto diet. Finally, if you find it hard to lose weight on a ketogenic diet, there may be plenty other reasons than the level of ketone bodies: Not Losing Weight on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up and Read Further. Continue reading >>

Ketone Urine Test

Ketone Urine Test

Diabetes patients are often instructed by their doctor to consistently tested for ketone levels. It is a very important urine test as it shows indications of worsening diabetes condition and possible kidney ineffectiveness which can lead to a number of complications and even kidney failure and even death if the body is not helped to recover its proper insulin metabolism. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The test can be done by taking a urine sample, but also a blood sample. There are over-the-counter tests available at general pharmacies. Blood glucose levels are good indicators to have the test done if the glucose levels are abnormal. Other indicators are frequent urination, thirst, rapid breathing, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, fatigue, a fruity smell to your breath, muscle aches or stiffness, and confusion. Pregnant women with diabetes should regularly check their ketone levels before eating in the morning. What Are Ketones Ketones are chemicals produced when the body does not have enough insulin in the blood. When ketones build up in the body for a long time, the body is forced to burn fat to get the energy it would have gotten from insulin. Over time, serious illness or coma can result involving problems with the kidneys. Ketone buildup is especially dangerous to diabetes patients as complications can result in Diabetic Ketoacidosis. If you suspect you may be at risk of having increased levels of ketones, you may want to do a urine ketone test. More general urine tests (urinalysis) can usually tell a bigger picture about urine composition. Monitoring Ketone Levels As mentioned earlier, there are over the counter urine tests that measure the k Continue reading >>

What The Heck Is Ketosis, And Is It For Me?

What The Heck Is Ketosis, And Is It For Me?

You've probably heard of the ketogenic diet by now. Maybe you've even tried a few keto recipes. I mean, everything should be bacon-wrapped and topped with avocado, right? I never recommend jumping into a diet without understanding the ins and outs — you need to know what a diet is all about before you can decide if it is a good fit for you. The keto diet, for example, gets its name from the metabolic state called "ketosis." Fans of the keto diet say that getting your body into this state of ketosis can help you improve body composition (lose fat while retaining lean muscle), increase your energy throughout the day, and even boost your sex drive. Sounds pretty good to me. Let's take a deep dive into the world of keto to find out what ketosis is, how to achieve it, and if it's right for you. What Is Ketosis? When you follow a keto diet, your goal is to be "in ketosis." So, how do you get to the magical land of ketosis? The keto diet requires you drastically reduce your carbohydrate intake (some people go as low as five to 10 percent of their daily calorie intake) while substantially increasing your fat intake, and keeping your protein intake at a moderate level. Sadly, this doesn't mean butter and bacon at every meal. You will be swapping out your bread, oatmeal, cookies, crackers, sweeteners (even natural ones), potatoes, and most fruits for avocado, olive oil, nuts, fish, eggs, meat, green veggies, a little bit of full-fat dairy, and a few berries. So, instead of oatmeal with peanut butter and banana for breakfast, you may have an omelet with bacon, kale, and tomatoes. By shrinking your carb intake, you are also slashing the level of glucose in your bloodstream. Glucose is your body's preferred energy source, but, in its absence, your body will use up fat stores as en Continue reading >>

How To Identify Ketosis

How To Identify Ketosis

Expert Reviewed Ketosis is a normal metabolic process by which your body breaks down stored fat for energy, which can also result in a dangerous buildup of ketones in the body called ketoacidosis.[1] Ketosis is often the product of a low-carbohydrate diet that people use to lose weight and gain muscle or it can also be a product of malnutrition. Although the long-term risks of ketosis are not clear, there is some evidence that it can increase your risk of heart disease and certain cancers.[2] By recognizing the signs of ketosis, you can help minimize your risk for developing ketoacidosis.[3] Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver breaks down fat to produce ketones. Ketones, on a ketogenic diet, are the primary fuel source for the body. If you’re new to the ketogenic diet and you still have questions, consider reading our Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Keto > There are three main ways to measure the ketones in your body, all of which have their advantages and disadvantages. The most common ways to measure are: Blood Ketone Meter. Very accurate but the strips are extremely expensive. Breath Ketone Meters. More accurate than the urine strips, but can sometimes vary in accuracy. Cheaper than blood strips in the long-run. Urine Stricks. This will answer the question “Am I in ketosis?” but will not provide an accurate measure of blood ketones. Scroll down to read a more in-depth analysis of each, and what we recommend for you. Measuring Ketones with Urine Sticks Urine sticks will always be the cheapest and easiest way to measure ketosis. For beginners, this should cover everything you need – there is no point in getting more complex blood strips so early on when you are still trying to understand the nuances of a ketogenic diet. Ultimately, keto sticks are very easy to use – you hold the sticks in your urine stream for a few seconds, and within 10-15 seconds you should notice a color change in the strip (if you are in ketosis). The color of the stick typically is measured in red: light pink being low in ketone production and dark purple being high in ketone production. While keto sticks can be ideal for a general answer to the question “Am I in ketosis?”, they aren’t precise with their accuracy. They measure the acetoacetate in your urine, which is an unused ketone by the body. As you get deeper into ketosis and your body adapts, your b Continue reading >>

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A Keto Diet For Beginners

A keto or ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, which turns the body into a fat-burning machine. It has many proven benefits for weight loss, health and performance, as millions of people have experienced already. 1 Here you’ll learn how to eat a keto diet based on real foods. You’ll find visual guides, recipes, meal plans and a simple 2-week get started program, all you need to succeed on keto. Get even more, custom meal plans, ask the experts and low-carb TV, with a free trial. 1. Introduction: What is ketosis? The “keto” in a ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it makes the body produce small fuel molecules called “ketones”. 2 This is an alternative fuel for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to blood sugar). Ketones are produced in the liver, from fat. They are then used as fuel throughout the body, including the brain. The brain is a hungry organ that consumes lots of energy every day, 3 and it can’t run on fat directly. It can only run on glucose… or ketones. On a ketogenic diet, your entire body switches its fuel supply to run almost entirely on fat. Insulin levels become very low, and fat burning increases dramatically. It becomes easy to access your fat stores to burn them off. This is obviously great if you’re trying to lose weight, but there are also other less obvious benefits, such as less hunger and a steady supply of energy. When the body produces ketones, it’s said to be in ketosis. The fastest way to get there is by fasting – not eating anything – but nobody can fast forever. A keto diet, on the other hand, can be eaten indefinite Continue reading >>

A Detailed Guide On How To Test Your Ketone Levels

A Detailed Guide On How To Test Your Ketone Levels

I have to be honest with you. I’ve been making some critical mistakes. I was assuming that I was in ketosis for months but I’m now finding out that isn’t the case. Not even close. I’ve finally hunkered down and have been measuring my ketones the right way and the results have been pretty surprising. I was eating too much protein, and too little fat. I was eating too frequently. I was eating too few calories. I never would have known this without testing. Time for you to learn from the mistakes I made and test the right way. Ketosis can be a powerful nutrition approach to use switch your metabolism to prioritize for fat loss, mental output, physical performance, and much more. The main problem? Many people just assume that if they are “low carb” they are in ketosis, but think again. How do you know if you’re actually in ketosis? As I love to say, “test, don’t guess” when it comes to your health. (Still trying to get “track, don’t slack” to catch on…) I’ll outline in this article the three ways to test your ketone levels and which you should be doing when. HOW TO TEST YOUR KETONE LEVELS: THREE DIFFERENT WAYS There are three testing methods because there are three forms of ketones in your body: acetate, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutryate. Each of these ketone bodies do slightly different things and are in different forms, so they can be tested individually with different methods. The three different area these ketones exist in your body are your breath, urine or blood. The good news is that all of these ketone level measurements can be done at home, by yourself. You don’t need to go to a lab or use any fancy high-tech gadgetry. Tracking consistently, at least when you’re getting used to a ketogenic diet, is important so you know how mu Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

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