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Ketosis Symptoms In Babies

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency related to diabetes. It’s also the most likely time for a child with diabetes to die.” DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose; the person is dehydrated; and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. The initial insulin deficit is most often caused by the onset of diabetes, by an illness or infection, or by not taking insulin when it is needed. Ketones are your brain’s “second-best fuel,” Hellman says, with glucose being number one. If you don’t have enough glucose in your cells to supply energy to your brain, yo Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Warning Signs

Symptoms Of Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis Warning Signs

Ketosis or nutritional ketosis is a perfectly healthy metabolic process in which the body burns stored fats for energy when it doesn’t have adequate glucose. Mild ketosis may help you lose weight and even be therapeutic. Unfortunately, there’s another less desirable condition that’s easily confused with ketosis – and that’s diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). This is a high blood sugar-related emergency that accounts for over 100,000 hospital admissions every single year in the United States alone.1 DKA strikes those with diabetes and, if left unchecked, could even put you in a coma. Understanding ketosis and DKA and knowing how they’re different could save your life if you’re diabetic. Mild Ketosis Has Therapeutic Benefits People on diets like the ketogenic diet or Atkins diet cut down carb intake and switch to a diet that’s high in protein and fat instead. This sets your body up for ketosis, which is intended to help with weight loss. Some studies have even found that ketosis can help lower levels of blood glucose, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides, besides bringing down body weight and body mass index.2 Mild ketosis has also been explored for its therapeutic applications in diseases associated with free radical damage, hypoxia (oxygen deficiency in tissues), and insulin resistance.3 But There Are Still Some Side Effects Of Ketosis When you are on a low-carb diet or haven’t eaten for a long time, the body undergoes ketosis and you may experience some side effects.4 These are usually temporary and occur initially when your body is adjusting to burning fat and ketones instead of carbs. Some compare these ketosis symptoms to those you’d experience when you are coming down with flu, giving rise to the term “ketosis flu” or just “ket Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Signs And Symptoms Of Diabetes In Infants

Diabetes can affect individuals of any age, including infants and children. Knowing that your baby has diabetes can be really frightening. But by learning how to perform glucose testing and give insulin, you can help your child to grow up healthy. The first thing you need to do, though, is to keep your own stress level down. Your baby can sense if you feel anxious, so it is up to you to be as brave as your little one. Types Medical experts say that Type 1 diabetes is the form of the disease most often diagnosed in infants. More commonly known as juvenile onset diabetes, this autoimmune disorder prevents the body from producing enough insulin, a hormone needed so that cells can break down glucose for energy. Type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes, can also affect infants. Insulin resistance is the primary cause of Type 2 diabetes. As a result, both insulin and blood sugar levels in the body continue to rise. Certain medical conditions or genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, can cause this type of diabetes as well. Symptoms The American Academy of Pediatrics tells parents to contact their child’s pediatrician immediately if she shows any of the following symptoms. Crankiness, sweating, trembling, paleness and bluish tinge to the lips or fingers are symptoms that an infant might be hypoglycemic. A glucose test should be performed, as treatment may be needed if the infant’s blood sugar is too low. A baby’s brain development requires a continuous supply of glucose. Therefore, parents must carefully manage their child’s diabetes. Likewise, when an infant’s glucose levels climb too high, hyperglycemia means that your infant may not be getting enough insulin in combination with how much you are feeding her. While infants often display no sy Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Know The Signs

Know The Signs

Do you know the signs of type 1 diabetes? The most dangerous time in the life of a diabetic child is prior to diagnosis when the symptoms are often confused with the flu. Tragically, children sometimes die or become brain damaged by the time anyone realizes that they have diabetes. Even doctors can miss that a child has diabetes until it’s too late. Learn the warning signs. Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic illnesses of children. The majority–90%–of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes have no family history, so all parents and healthcare providers need to recognize the symptoms. Every year, the number of children getting diabetes goes up. No one knows why. If you see any of these signs and symptoms in your child, see your healthcare provider and make sure that your child is tested for type 1 diabetes. If your child is showing signs of DKA (see symptoms below), go to the ER immediately. There is no time to waste. At this stage, children are often transported by ambulance or helicopter and sometimes are placed on life support. Let’s not lose one more child to this disease due to a missed diagnosis. Let the memory of Mary Kathryn and the tragic loss of this 8 year old girl help save another child’s life. See the International Diabetes Federation’s World Diabetes Day Web page and their campaign, A Life for a Child. No child should die of diabetes. Signs of Type 1 Diabetes •Excessive thirst—may be overlooked in warm weather. •Frequent urination—toilet-trained children often begin wetting the bed or getting up during the night to urinate. Babies can soak through diapers. •Loss of weight—often the most noticeable symptom. Any weight loss should be evaluated by a doctor. •Fruity-smelling breath or acetone-smelling breath—sign that Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, And Complications

Diabetic ketoacidosis definition and facts Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes (though rare, it can occur in people with type 2 diabetes) that occurs when the body produces high levels of ketones due to lack of insulin. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin. The signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include Risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis are type 1 diabetes, and missing insulin doses frequently, or being exposed to a stressor requiring higher insulin doses (infection, etc). Diabetic ketoacidosis is diagnosed by an elevated blood sugar (glucose) level, elevated blood ketones and acidity of the blood (acidosis). The treatment for diabetic ketoacidosis is insulin, fluids and electrolyte therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis can be prevented by taking insulin as prescribed and monitoring glucose and ketone levels. The prognosis for a person with diabetic ketoacidosis depends on the severity of the disease and the other underlying medical conditions. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe and life-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the cells in our body do not receive the sugar (glucose) they need for energy. This happens while there is plenty of glucose in the bloodstream, but not enough insulin to help convert glucose for use in the cells. The body recognizes this and starts breaking down muscle and fat for energy. This breakdown produces ketones (also called fatty acids), which cause an imbalance in our electrolyte system leading to the ketoacidosis (a metabolic acidosis). The sugar that cannot be used because of the lack of insulin stays in the bloodstream (rather than going into the cell and provide energy). The kidneys filter some of the glucose (suga Continue reading >>

Clinical Features And Diagnosis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

Clinical Features And Diagnosis Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

INTRODUCTION Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Less commonly, it can occur in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus. DKA is caused by absolute or relative insulin deficiency. (See "Classification of diabetes mellitus and genetic diabetic syndromes".) The incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus have increased across all ethnic groups. This has been coupled with an increasing awareness that children with type 2 diabetes mellitus can present with ketosis or DKA, particularly in obese African American adolescents [1-7]. (See "Classification of diabetes mellitus and genetic diabetic syndromes", section on 'DKA in type 2 diabetes'.) The clinical features and diagnosis of DKA in children will be reviewed here. This discussion is primarily based upon the large collective experience of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. There is limited experience in the assessment and diagnosis of DKA in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus, although the same principles should apply. The management of diabetes in children, treatment of DKA in children and the epidemiology and pathogenesis of DKA are discussed separately. (See "Management of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents" and "Treatment and complications of diabetic ketoacidosis in children and adolescents" and "Diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state in adults: Epidemiology and pathogenesis".) DEFINITION Diabetic ketoacidosis – A consensus statement from the International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) in 2014 defined the following biochemical criteria for the diagnosis of DKA [8]: Hyperglycemia – Blood glucose of >200 mg/dL (11 mmol/L) AND Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Children And Adolescents

Go to: Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is considered to be a common presentation of both type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents. DKA arises due to lack of adequate insulin in the body. Insulin stops the use of fat as an energy source by inhibiting the peptide hormone glucagon. Without insulin, glucagon levels rise resulting in the release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue, as well as amino acids from muscle cells. Neurological observations should be made for warning signs and symptoms of cerebral edema, and capillary blood glucose concentration should be measured on an hourly basis. Every 2-4 h electrolytes, blood gases, and beta-hydroxybutyrate should be measured. Cerebral edema occurs in 0.5-0.9% of all episodes of DKA. It is considered to be a major cause of death in childhood DKA. Treatment of cerebral edema should be prompt and immediate. Successful DKA management in children depends upon swift diagnosis, meticulous monitoring of clinical and biochemical parameters with prompt intervention. Keywords: Cerebral edema, diabetic ketoacidosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus Go to: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is considered to be a common presentation of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and occasionally, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in children and adolescents. DKA arises due to lack of adequate insulin in the body. Insulin stops the use of fat as an energy source by inhibiting the peptide hormone glucagon. Without insulin, glucagon levels rise resulting in the release of free fatty acids from adipose tissue, as well as amino acids from muscle cells. The biochemical criteria for DKA diagnosis include hyperglycemia (blood glucose [BG] higher than 11 mmol/L or ≥200 mg/dL) with a venous pH of <7.3 and/or a bicarbonate (HCO3 Continue reading >>

Episode 63 – Pediatric Dka

Episode 63 – Pediatric Dka

Pediatric DKA was identified as one of key diagnoses that we need to get better at managing in a massive national needs assessment conducted by the fine folks at TREKK – Translating Emergency Knowledge for Kids – one of EM Cases’ partners who’s mission is to improve the care of children in non-pediatric emergency departments across the country. You might be wondering – why was DKA singled out in this needs assessment? It turns out that kids who present to the ED in DKA without a known history of diabetes, can sometimes be tricky to diagnose, as they often present with vague symptoms. When a child does have a known history of diabetes, and the diagnosis of DKA is obvious, the challenge turns to managing severe, life-threatening DKA, so that we avoid the many potential complications of the DKA itself as well as the complications of treatment – cerebral edema being the big bad one. The approach to these patients has evolved over the years, even since I started practicing, from bolusing insulin and super aggressive fluid resuscitation to more gentle fluid management and delayed insulin drips, as examples. There are subtleties and controversies in the management of DKA when it comes to fluid management, correcting serum potassium and acidosis, preventing cerebral edema, as well as airway management for the really sick kids. In this episode we‘ll be asking our guest pediatric emergency medicine experts Dr. Sarah Reid, who you may remember from her powerhouse performance on our recent episodes on pediatric fever and sepsis, and Dr. Sarah Curtis, not only a pediatric emergency physician, but a prominent pediatric emergency researcher in Canada, about the key historical and examination pearls to help pick up this sometimes elusive diagnosis, what the value of serum Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Facts Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that may occur in people who have diabetes, most often in those who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. It involves the buildup of toxic substances called ketones that make the blood too acidic. High ketone levels can be readily managed, but if they aren't detected and treated in time, a person can eventually slip into a fatal coma. DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. Although much less common, DKA can occasionally occur in people with type 2 diabetes under extreme physiologic stress. Causes With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body's cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can't get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn't available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body's metabolic processes aren't able Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms?

What Is Type 1 Diabetes (Juvenile)? Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition that usually starts in childhood, but can occur in adults (30 to 40-year-olds). In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces very little insulin. Insulin helps cells in the body convert sugar into energy. When the pancreas cannot make enough insulin, sugar starts to build up in the blood, causing life-threatening complications. Individuals with type 1 diabetes must take some form of insulin for the rest of their lives. Unusual Thirst Symptoms Unusual thirst is a very common symptom of type 1 diabetes. This condition causes the kidneys to remove excess sugar in the blood by getting rid of more water. The water is removed through urinating, causing dehydration and dehydration causes you to drink more water. Weight Loss Symptoms Patient with type 1 diabetes develop unintentional weight loss and an increase in appetite because blood sugar levels remain high and the body metabolizes fat for energy. Disrupted glucose metabolism also causes patient to feel a lack of energy and drowsy for extended periods Excess urination also cause weight loss because many calories are leaving the body in urine. Skin Problems Symptoms The disruption in glucose metabolism in patient with type 1 diabetes causes skin changes. Type 1 diabetics are at a higher risk for bacterial infections and fungal infections. Poor blood circulation in the skin may also occur. Patient with type 1 diabetes are often infected with fungal infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans. Common fungal infections include athlete's foot, vaginal yeast infection in women, jock itch, ringworm, and diaper rashes in babies. Diaper rash caused by the yeast Candida albicans can spread to other areas of the body such as the stomach and legs. Other Dangero Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious problem that can occur in people with diabetes if their body starts to run out of insulin. This causes harmful substances called ketones to build up in the body, which can be life-threatening if not spotted and treated quickly. DKA mainly affects people with type 1 diabetes, but can sometimes occur in people with type 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes, it's important to be aware of the risk and know what to do if DKA occurs. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis Signs of DKA include: needing to pee more than usual being sick breath that smells fruity (like pear drop sweets or nail varnish) deep or fast breathing feeling very tired or sleepy passing out DKA can also cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) and a high level of ketones in your blood or urine, which you can check for using home-testing kits. Symptoms usually develop over 24 hours, but can come on faster. Check your blood sugar and ketone levels Check your blood sugar level if you have symptoms of DKA. If your blood sugar is 11mmol/L or over and you have a blood or urine ketone testing kit, check your ketone level. If you do a blood ketone test: lower than 0.6mmol/L is a normal reading 0.6 to 1.5mmol/L means you're at a slightly increased risk of DKA and should test again in a couple of hours 1.6 to 2.9mmol/L means you're at an increased risk of DKA and should contact your diabetes team or GP as soon as possible 3mmol/L or over means you have a very high risk of DKA and should get medical help immediately If you do a urine ketone test, a result of more than 2+ means there's a high chance you have DKA. When to get medical help Go to your nearest accident and emergency (A&E) department straight away if you think you have DKA, especially if you have a high level of ketones in Continue reading >>

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Today, we’re excited to share with you another guest blog from Katie Janowiak, who works for the Medtronic Foundation, our company’s philanthropic arm. When she first told me her story about food poisoning and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), I knew others could benefit from hearing it as well. Thanks Katie for your openness and allowing us to share your scary story so that the LOOP community can learn from it. Throughout this past year, I’ve had the honor of sharing with you, the amazing LOOP community, my personal journey and the often humorous sequence of events that is my life with T1. Humor is, after all, the best (and cheapest) therapy. Allow me to pause today to share with you the down and dirty of what it feels like to have something that is not the slightest bit humorous: diabetic ketoacidosis.You are hot. You are freezing. You are confused. You are blacked out but coherent. You go to talk but words fail you. Time flies and goes in slow motion simultaneously. You will likely smell and look like death. In my instance, this was brought on by the combination of excessive vomiting and dehydration caused by food poisoning and the diabetic ketoacidosis that followed after my body had gone through so much. In hindsight, I was lucky, my husband knew that I had food poisoning because I began vomiting after our meal. But I had never prepped him on diabetic ketoacidosis and the symptoms (because DKA was for those other diabetics.) Upon finding me in our living room with a bowl of blood and bile by my side (no, I am not exaggerating), he got me into the car and took me to emergency care. It was 5:30 p.m. – and I thought it was 11:00 a.m. The series of events that led up to my stay in the ICU began innocently enough. It was a warm summer night and my husband and I walke Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia refers to low blood sugar, or technically a lower than normal blood glucose level. It is rarely encountered in pediatric practice outside of the newborn nursery, where it is a commonplace event. Profound hypoglycemia in the newborn can cause brain damage. Aggressive blood glucose monitoring of asymptomatic (nothing appears to be wrong) infants has been the standard. I think attitudes are softening in the era of cost-benefit analysis, since many babies seem to be subjected to large numbers of (in retrospect) needless blood glucose determinations compared to the actual number of significant problems identified. Symptoms of hypoglycemia are generally related to the body's efforts to raise the blood glucose level back to where it should be. These symptoms are really just the manifestations of adrenaline (epinephrine) release, which is the chief signal the body uses to mobilise stored glucose into the bloodstream. The most noticable adrenaline effects are nervousness, light-headedness, increased heart rate, and a particularly urgent sense of hunger. Headache is sometimes a symptom of hypoglycemia; I believe the explanation is brain neuronal cell dysfunction. In the newborn, symptoms of hypoglycemia include sweating, jitteriness, rapid breathing, rapid heart rate, pallor, or even apnea. Profound or very difficult to treat hypoglycemia in a newborn can signal the presence of rare but dangerous conditions such as galactosemia, growth hormone deficiency, insulin secreting tumors, or may reflect severe intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Hypoglycemia is the opposite of hyperglycemia - high blood glucose - which is the hallmark of diabetes. True hypoglycemia in children older than newborns is reasonably rare and is not the cause of the myriad complaints and condit Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Pregnancy

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious metabolic complication of diabetes with high mortality if undetected. Its occurrence in pregnancy compromises both the fetus and the mother profoundly. Although predictably more common in patients with type 1 diabetes, it has been recognised in those with type 2 diabetes as well as gestational diabetes, especially with the use of corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity and β2-agonists for tocolysis.1–3 Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in the second and third trimesters because of increased insulin resistance, and is also seen in newly presenting type 1 diabetes patients. With increasing practice of antepartum diabetes screening and the availability of early and frequent prenatal care/surveillance, the incidence and outcomes of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy have vastly improved. However, it still remains a major clinical problem in pregnancy since it tends to occur at lower blood glucose levels and more rapidly than in non-pregnant patients often causing delay in the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to illustrate a typical patient who may present with diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and review the literature on this relatively uncommon condition and provide an insight into the pathophysiology and management. MAGNITUDE OF THE PROBLEM In non-pregnant patients with type 1 diabetes, the incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis is about 1–5 episodes per 100 per year with mortality averaging 5%–10%.4 The incidence rates of diabetic ketoacidosis in pregnancy and the corresponding fetal mortality rates from different retrospective studies5–8 are summarised in the table 1. As is evident from the table, both the incidence and rates of fetal loss in pregnancies have fallen in recent times compared with those before. In 1963 Continue reading >>

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