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Ketosis Survival Mechanism

Anti-aging And Weight Loss With A Ketogenic Diet

Anti-aging And Weight Loss With A Ketogenic Diet

Is it possible to slow down or roll back your aging clock by what you are eating? Most people would agree that what you eat can have a significant impact on your health and aging. But what foods should you focus on to help you tap into the proverbial fountain of youth? Mounting evidence, through research and case studies, is demonstrating the value of adopting a ketogenic diet to reverse the aging process and help with a number of chronic, metabolic diseases including Type 2 Diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, neurological disease and cancer. What Are Ketones? Ketogenic diets get their name from an alternative fuel source your body can produce called ketone bodies, or simply called ketones. When blood glucose levels become low, your liver breaks down fatty acids, which are converted into ketones. Your brain and heart rely on ketones as a vital energy source during periods of fasting. This is a valuable survival mechanism passed down by our ancestors, who may have had to go several days or longer without eating. Without this survival mechanism, the human race would no longer be. What Is A Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets are high in healthy fats, from sources such as avocados, coconut oil, raw nuts and seeds, and grass-fed sources of eggs, cheese, butter and meats. Adequate protein is included and carbohydrates are very limited. Under these ratios, your body shifts from relying on glucose as a fuel source to converting fatty acids to ketones as a “clean” fuel source. The mitochondria of your cells can produce energy from either glucose or ketones. During this process of energy production free radicals are also produced, which can damage your mitochondria. Free radical production is much less when the mitochondria are using ketones instead of glucose as a fuel s Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets And Alzheimer’s Disease

Ketogenic Diets And Alzheimer’s Disease

1. Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia, accounting for over 50% of individuals affected [1]. This disease is characterized by progressive memory impairment and cognitive decline interfering with daily life activities. The most common early symptom of AD is difficulty remembering recent events. The symptoms of patients with advancing disease can include executive dysfunction, disorientation, problems with language, mood swings, behavioral changes and impaired self-care [2]. Age-standardized prevalence for individuals aged over 60 years varied between 5% and 7% in most world regions [3]. An estimated 35.6 million people lived with dementia worldwide in 2010, with numbers expected to almost double every 20 years [3]. AD has a long preclinical phase of several decades and the most important risk factor for AD is increasing age. Impaired vascular health has been shown to be another major risk factor for cognitive decline and interventions for cardiovascular risk may therefore improve cognitive health at the population level [4,5]. Other lifestyle-related factors, such as obesity, diabetes, smoking, diet, physical and mental inactivity, have been suggested to play a role in dementia, and potential preventive measures related to these risk factors should be investigated [6]. AD is neuropathologically defined by neuronal loss and the accumulation of extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-containing plaques and intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau protein-containing neurofibrillary tangles in the brain [7]. The accumulation of abnormally folded Aβ and tau proteins in amyloid plaques and neuronal tangles, respectively, appear to be causally associated with the neurodegeneration in AD [8]. However, Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Fasting: How Starving Yourself Then Feasting On Fat Can Get You Into ‘beast Mode’

Ketogenic Fasting: How Starving Yourself Then Feasting On Fat Can Get You Into ‘beast Mode’

SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST As you can probably surmise, I am advocating for us to be like cavemen, well for good reasons of course! The Paleolithic era brought about some of the fittest humans the world has ever seen. Seriously, have a think about some of the conditions cavemen had to go through just to survive. Living in a house made of stone, going days on end without food, and fending off hungry Sabre tooth tigers, just all part of the deal with being a caveman. Fast forward to today, our living standards have risen to god-like compared to our rudimentary predecessors. My point is, our bodies were designed to survive the harshest of environments, however, somewhere along the timeline of human existence, we've replaced spears with iPhones and caves with condos - lucky us, right? Although we've evolved immensely technologically, our biological evolution hasn't changed all that much - just a new haircut and fancy clothes. Now, we don't have to live like cavemen at all. What we can do is to harness some of the inherent survival mechanisms that all of us have within our D.N.A - namely, fasting and the ketogenic diet. Let's look at both briefly before we talk about going into what I like to call 'beast mode' (or having the physical prowess of a caveman!). FASTING Now you may have heard the benefits of fasting, if you haven't you've probably been living underneath a giant rock - not like there's anything wrong with that. Here's a brief list of what fasting can do for you: Burn fat stores Enhance muscle growth and repair Boosts immune function and repair Increased mental clarity and focus Increases longevity, and much more By strategically timing your meals (i.e. not eating for long periods of time), you can enter what is called the fasted state. This is essentially where your Continue reading >>

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Introduction Numerous dietary components and supplements have been evaluated as possible cancer prevention agents; however, until recently few studies have investigated diet as a possible adjuvant to cancer treatment. One of the most prominent and universal metabolic alterations seen in cancer cells is an increase in the rate of glycolytic metabolism even in the presence of oxygen [1]. Although increased glucose uptake by tumor cells was thought to support increased cancer cell proliferation and energy demands, recent studies suggest that increased tumor cell glycolytic metabolism may represent an adaptive response to escape metabolic oxidative stress caused by altered mitochondrial oxygen metabolism [2–4]. These data support the hypothesis that cancer cells are reliant on increased glucose consumption to maintain redox homeostasis due to increased one electron reductions of O2 to form O2•− and H2O2 in mitochondria. This divergence from normal cell metabolism has sparked a growing interest in targeting mitochondrial oxygen metabolism as a means of selectively sensitizing cancer cells to therapy [5–17]. In this regard, dietary modifications, such as high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets that enhance mitochondrial oxidative metabolism while limiting glucose consumption could represent a safe, inexpensive, easily implementable, and effective approach to selectively enhance metabolic stress in cancer cells versus normal cells. What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet consists of high fat, with moderate to low protein content, and very low carbohydrates, which forces the body to burn fat instead of glucose for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Generally, the ratio by weight is 3:1 or 4:1 fat to carbohydrate+protein, yielding a diet that has an energy dis Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality And Improves Memory In Aging Mice

Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality And Improves Memory In Aging Mice

Summary Ketogenic diets recapitulate certain metabolic aspects of dietary restriction such as reliance on fatty acid metabolism and production of ketone bodies. We investigated whether an isoprotein ketogenic diet (KD) might, like dietary restriction, affect longevity and healthspan in C57BL/6 male mice. We find that Cyclic KD, KD alternated weekly with the Control diet to prevent obesity, reduces midlife mortality but does not affect maximum lifespan. A non-ketogenic high-fat diet (HF) fed similarly may have an intermediate effect on mortality. Cyclic KD improves memory performance in old age, while modestly improving composite healthspan measures. Gene expression analysis identifies downregulation of insulin, protein synthesis, and fatty acid synthesis pathways as mechanisms common to KD and HF. However, upregulation of PPARα target genes is unique to KD, consistent across tissues, and preserved in old age. In all, we show that a non-obesogenic ketogenic diet improves survival, memory, and healthspan in aging mice. To access this article, please choose from the options below Now available: purchase access to all research journal HTML articles for 6 or 36 hours. Click here to explore this opportunity. Purchase Access to this Article If you are a current subscriber with Society Membership or an Account Number, claim your access now. Subscribe to this Journal Continue reading >>

Ketosis Diet

Ketosis Diet

*Teaser: This transformation picture of us was 8 weeks of progress. Kodie ate 2 days 3 servings carbs, 1 day 1 serving carbs alternating, & Tanner's carb consumption was strategic according to mode of exercise. ​ Ketosis Diet: What is it and is it beneficial? The Ketosis diet can be characterized by high fat, low carb. The goal of the diet is to force the body to produce ketones which are created from the breakdown of fats in the liver. This does not happen from starving the body of calories but it stems from starving the body of carbohydrates. Benefits you can find on the web of the Ketosis diet: 1. Control of cholesterol and blood pressure 2. Decreased acne 3. Increased energy and normalized hunger 4. Increased mental focus 5. Control of blood sugar 6. Increased weight loss But wait..don't those benefits sound familiar? Isn't that what every "diet" does? Stay tuned for tomorrow's post regarding all types of diets and find out THE MOST BENEFICIAL ONE!!! Back to Ketosis... An example Ketosis meal plan will lead to a macronutrient breakdown of: 10-25% carbohydrate, 25-40% protein, and 35-65% fat. As I have referenced many time, fats are much more dense in calories than the other 2 macronutrients. For example, 2 pieces of Dave's Killer bread are about 240 calories. 25 almonds are about 180 calories. This forces someone on the keto diet to ingest a lot less food in comparison to the typical meal plan with macro balance. This is beneficial for some that are on the go constantly and are not big eaters but for those of us that enjoy quantity of food, this really limits intake. Exogenous Ketones: Another supplement that increases laziness and ensures results Uh huh...typical of a supplement company to promise something that allows for results without having to work for it. W Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet – The Big Mistake

Ketogenic Diet – The Big Mistake

Watch the rest of the series – let us notify you when future videos become available Ketogenic diets are all the rage these days for weight loss, mental clarity and dealing with cancer or epilepsy. What was once looked at as a therapeutic diet for medical issues has now gone mainstream with athletes and extreme dieters using it to push the limits. America is the land of extremes so it’s the perfect diet at the perfect time because if it’s done right, it is as extreme as you can get. The ketogenic diet is based on a type of fat called a ketone. Your body has the capability to break down fat and convert it into ketones as an alternative fuel for your brain and heart. It’s a survival mechanism that is built-in to fuel survival in times of starvation. The body runs out of sources for sugar and then switches to ketones to survive until you can find food. Fifty years or so ago the ketogenic diet was discovered as a successful treatment for epilepsy. The advent of the pharmaceutical industry pushed it out of the spotlight and soon it was discarded in favor of the new and easy solution of prescription drugs. Well it’s back now and bigger than ever in part due to the cancer epidemic and partly because low carb diets are so popular. Eating a ketogenic diet is extremely low carb with over 70% of calories coming from fat. Throw in 15% calories from protein and there isn’t much room left for carbs. This type of diet raises ketones and drops blood sugar. You’re eating less sugar and the ketones themselves influence your levels of insulin and blood sugar, limiting access of both to the cells. Combined with herbs like adaptogens, the ketogenic diet is probably the best blood sugar regulating diet you can be on. Why adaptogens? Because outside of carbs and simples sugars, Continue reading >>

Does Fasting To Get Into Ketosis Really Work?

Does Fasting To Get Into Ketosis Really Work?

If you have finally acknowledged the benefits of Ketogenic diet and gung-ho to start the diet, you must be wondering what is the fastest way to get your body into ketosis. Since, Ketosis resembles the body’s starvation survival mechanism, many people ask if fasting to get into ketosis really work? For those who don’t know, Ketosis is a natural process in which the body starts burning fat for energy instead of the usual source carbohydrates, thus allowing faster fat burn and quicker weight loss. If you are desperate to get onto ketosis, for whatever reason, the answer for you is extremely simple. Go on a complete 3-day fast! Yes, if you fast completely i.e., absolutely zero food over the next 3 days, your body will go on survival mode and automatically trigger ketosis. However, we wouldn’t recommend it as it is not healthy and you may develop some health concern in the process. Your motive is to reach this concentration of Ketone in the body: However, we recommend a rather gradual, more effective, and healthier way to get into Ketosis. Try our 3-day program to get into Ketosis for free. Although complete fasting might give you the desired result, it might lead to more complications. Thus, it is better that you stick to intermittent fasting instead. Begin with a 16 hour fast by skipping all meals from the night of Day 0 till 4 PM on Day 1. This will allow your to burn the existing carbs in the body and prepare your body for ketosis. You should continue intermittent over the next few days as well. But, you can reduce the hours of fasting. For instance, you may choose to skip any 1 meal within the day. Additionally, during your intermittent fasts you may include exogenous products into your diet to quicken the process. Though we usually recommend our clients to use na Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketogenic Diet And Food Intake Control: A Complex Relationship

Ketosis, Ketogenic Diet And Food Intake Control: A Complex Relationship

Introduction Hunger and satiety are two important mechanisms involved in body weight regulation. Even though humans can regulate food intake by will, there are systems within the central nervous system (CNS) that regulate food intake and energy expenditure. This complex network, whose control center is spread over different brain areas, receives information from adipose tissue, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and from blood and peripheral sensory receptors. The actions of the brain's hunger/satiety centers are influenced by nutrients, hormones and other signaling molecules. Ketone bodies are the major source of energy in the periods of fasting and/or carbohydrate shortage and might play a role in food intake control. Hypothalamic Control of Feeding/Appetite/Hunger The hypothalamus is the brain's main center responsible for hunger/satiety (H/S) control. In the theory that Mayer proposed more than 60 years ago, he assigned a central role to glucose levels in the H/S control: the so-called “glucostatic theory” (Mayer, 1955). Mayer suggested that depletion of carbohydrate availability leads to hunger, and the hypothalamic centers with receptors sensitive to glucose levels might be involved in the short-term regulation of energy intake (Mayer, 1955). The “feeding center” in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), according to the glucostatic theory, reacts to the between-meal fall of blood glucose and stimulates food intake. The LHA contains glucose-inhibited neurons that are stimulated by hypoglycemia, a process crucial to mediating the hyperphagia normally induced by hypoglycemia. The subsequent post-prandial hyperglycemia activates the “satiety center” in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), which contains glucose-excited neurons and inhibits both “feeding ce Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Is The High-fat, Low-carb Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

Is The High-fat, Low-carb Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

In the past several years, as measured by Google Trends, interest in an unusual style of eating called the ketogenic diet has tripled, and chances are you have a friend or coworker who’s tried it. Early adopters are typically people who run or ride a lot and want a food plan that doesn’t just fill their tanks but also boosts performance. Followers scarf eggs, cheese, and olive oil in hunger-killing quantities, turning their backs on just about every carb other than vegetables. They don’t use half-and-half in their coffee—they use heavy cream. Still, they’re likely to look a little lean, since the ketogenic diet turns them into 24/7 fat burners. (Even while surfing the couch.) And don’t be surprised if they report feeling better and stronger than ever. Ketones are a type of organic substance that includes ketone bodies, a collective name for the three molecules that are produced naturally by the liver when it breaks down fat for energy, a process that the ketogenic diet jump-starts. Under normal circumstances—that is, if you’re eating a standard, balanced diet—your body gets most of its energy by turning carbohydrates into glucose, which cells then convert to energy. If you significantly reduce carb intake (typically to less than 50 grams per day), your body undergoes a fundamental change: it starts relying on fat-generated ketone bodies as its primary energy source. The brain, heart, and muscles can all burn ketone bodies efficiently if you’ve been eating this way for a month or so. This metabolic state is called ketosis. Historically used as a driver of weight loss, carb restriction has recently gained favor in ultra-endurance circles and the military’s Special Forces. The idea is to radically crank up fat burning so that athletes and soldiers are Continue reading >>

Are There Different Types Of Ketosis?

Are There Different Types Of Ketosis?

Before reading this, if you haven’t already, I suggest reading What is a Ketogenic Diet and Understanding Ketosis so you will have a stronger understanding of what it means to be in a state of ketosis. The next step necessary in comprehending the ketogenic diet is learning the different types of ketosis that can occur. For this article, we will refer to three different forms of ketosis: fasting ketosis, nutritional ketosis, and pathological ketosis. The different types of ketosis vary in their degree of ketone production as well as their method of induction. Fasting Ketosis The idea of fasting has been around for hundreds of years and played a major part in the origins of the ketogenic diet. In fact, many great philosophers, such as Hippocrates, Socrates, and Aristotle, all praised the many benefits of fasting. Paracelsus, physician and father of toxicology, was quoted saying, “Fasting is the greatest remedy—the physician within.” While these early scientists and philosophers were definitely ahead of the game in recognizing the potential of fasting, the mechanisms were still yet to be understood. Ketosis tends to occur when insulin and blood glucose levels decrease to an extent that allows for increased fat oxidation, which is ultimately followed by greater ketone production. A minor state of ketosis can occur following periods of complete food restriction, such as an overnight fast. This may produce ketone levels around 0.1 mmol/L to 0.03 mmol/L. Shorter duration fasts typically will not raise ketone levels above these levels because the rate of ketone metabolism matches ketone synthesis. As the fast continues, the rate of ketone production exceeds ketone clearance, resulting in an increase in blood ketone levels (1). While a minor state of ketosis can occur du Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

Why Go On A Ketogenic Diet

Why Go On A Ketogenic Diet

The latest low carb fad is definitely nutritional ketosis. You’ve probably heard about it and are wondering, why go on a ketogenic diet. Ketosis is an innate part of our biology. It’s a metabolic state in which the body has shifted from using glucose as its primary fuel source into burning fat for fuel. Our body is made to burn fat. The adipose tissue acts like a black hole with infinite storage capacity. Any surplus calorie we don’t need right away gets deposited for future use. When in ketosis, we’ll be withdrawing energy from our own body fat to maintain a caloric balance. In the ancestral landscape, it would happen at times of food scarcity. Nutritional ketosis is the tool that helps us to survive famine and is an evolutionary mechanism. After the agricultural revolution, food has become more than abundant. We have year-round access to calories and scarcity has become a thing of the past. In addition to that, those calories are mainly derived from sugar. Because nutritional ketosis can only be induced by the lack of carbohydrates, this metabolic pathway has become deviant. Being in a constantly fed state and burning only glucose teaches the body to become dependent of it. Every function of an organism is there for a reason and the result of necessity. If there isn’t a way to start using fat for fuel, then ketosis won’t occur. What’s wrong with that? It doesn’t look like we’ll be facing famine any time soon, but losing this vital mechanism would be very detrimental. That’s why go into ketosis, at least every once in a while. The reason, why go on a ketogenic diet, isn’t only about survival. Its greatest benefits are not losing body fat or increasing your chances to make it, once sh*t hits the fan. The difference between burning sugar and fat is Continue reading >>

What's A Keto Diet?

What's A Keto Diet?

What is a ketogenic diet and how does it work? The process was initially developed in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder as an effective, non-pharmacological treatment for intractable childhood epilepsy. The process works when the body is put into a metabolic state called Ketosis, where ketones become the main source of energy for the brain and body to function. The ketogenic diet plan is high in fat and low in carbohydrates while supplying adequate protein to the body. This specific combination changes the manner in which your body uses energy. Additionally, while reducing epileptic seizures, this process lowers glucose levels while improving the body’s resistance to insulin. So I know a lot of you are probably wondering "what is Ketosis?" am I right? By definition, it is when your body goes through a metabolic state in which the body transforms ketones created from fat into energy, instead of energy created from converting carbohydrates. What are they exactly did you ask? Biochemically speaking, ketones are organic, carbon-based compounds that contain a central carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and two carbon-containing substituents, denoted by “R.” Ketones are considered simple compounds because they do not contain chemical groups that are readily reactive. Fatty acids in the body are oxidized by the liver for energy production. There are 3 different ketone bodies produced in mitochondria of the liver: acetone, acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Some of these fatty acids are oxidized by the liver for energy production while others can be partially oxidized to form the substrate acetoacetate, which is then converted to beta-hydroxybutyric acid; collective. These bodies produced in the liver are referred to as endogenous ketone bodies and are those Continue reading >>

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