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Ketosis Survival Mechanism

Ketogenic Diet – The Big Mistake

Ketogenic Diet – The Big Mistake

Watch the rest of the series – let us notify you when future videos become available Ketogenic diets are all the rage these days for weight loss, mental clarity and dealing with cancer or epilepsy. What was once looked at as a therapeutic diet for medical issues has now gone mainstream with athletes and extreme dieters using it to push the limits. America is the land of extremes so it’s the perfect diet at the perfect time because if it’s done right, it is as extreme as you can get. The ketogenic diet is based on a type of fat called a ketone. Your body has the capability to break down fat and convert it into ketones as an alternative fuel for your brain and heart. It’s a survival mechanism that is built-in to fuel survival in times of starvation. The body runs out of sources for sugar and then switches to ketones to survive until you can find food. Fifty years or so ago the ketogenic diet was discovered as a successful treatment for epilepsy. The advent of the pharmaceutical industry pushed it out of the spotlight and soon it was discarded in favor of the new and easy solution of prescription drugs. Well it’s back now and bigger than ever in part due to the cancer epidemic and partly because low carb diets are so popular. Eating a ketogenic diet is extremely low carb with over 70% of calories coming from fat. Throw in 15% calories from protein and there isn’t much room left for carbs. This type of diet raises ketones and drops blood sugar. You’re eating less sugar and the ketones themselves influence your levels of insulin and blood sugar, limiting access of both to the cells. Combined with herbs like adaptogens, the ketogenic diet is probably the best blood sugar regulating diet you can be on. Why adaptogens? Because outside of carbs and simples sugars, Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

The awareness surrounding a ketogenic diet seems to be growing, especially in the fitness and bodybuilding world, MMA, and dieting world thanks to the “Atkins” diet. There seems to be some confusion as to what a ketogenic diet really is, and how it is intended to be applied, so we are here to help! Low carb ketogenic diets have been around for centuries, stemming way back to the 1920’s and 30’s when it was introduced as a treatment for children with epilepsy. (So no, Atkins did not invent the keto diet!) Over the past 15 years, there has been an explosion in the use, and scientific interest in the KD. Ample scientific, epidemologic and anthropological data exists to support the general safety of a ketogenic diet. However, this data does not exonerate all the modern inceptions of this diet (you know, the double cheeseburger and bacon version?). The ketogenic diet is a special, rigid, high-fat, low-carbohydrate, moderate protein diet. It is MUCH stricter than the modified Atkins diet (also known as “MAD”), requiring careful measurements of calories, fluids, and protein. The goal of a ketogenic diet is to switch the body’s energy source from primarily being glucose to fat. Since fat cannot break down into glucose, it breaks down into what’s called “ketones”. Ketones are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy, hence the name (keto = ketone, genic = producing). Once the body is depleted of glucose and begins to use ketones for energy, one is considered being in the state of “ketosis”. Ketosis was an absolutely vital survival mechanism for early man. It allowed him to survive periods of starvation as well as long periods of carbohydrate deprivation. Ketosis is triggered by severe caloric restriction (if you are stranded in the desert) o Continue reading >>

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Review Article Ketogenic Diets As An Adjuvant Cancer Therapy: History And Potential Mechanism

Introduction Numerous dietary components and supplements have been evaluated as possible cancer prevention agents; however, until recently few studies have investigated diet as a possible adjuvant to cancer treatment. One of the most prominent and universal metabolic alterations seen in cancer cells is an increase in the rate of glycolytic metabolism even in the presence of oxygen [1]. Although increased glucose uptake by tumor cells was thought to support increased cancer cell proliferation and energy demands, recent studies suggest that increased tumor cell glycolytic metabolism may represent an adaptive response to escape metabolic oxidative stress caused by altered mitochondrial oxygen metabolism [2–4]. These data support the hypothesis that cancer cells are reliant on increased glucose consumption to maintain redox homeostasis due to increased one electron reductions of O2 to form O2•− and H2O2 in mitochondria. This divergence from normal cell metabolism has sparked a growing interest in targeting mitochondrial oxygen metabolism as a means of selectively sensitizing cancer cells to therapy [5–17]. In this regard, dietary modifications, such as high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets that enhance mitochondrial oxidative metabolism while limiting glucose consumption could represent a safe, inexpensive, easily implementable, and effective approach to selectively enhance metabolic stress in cancer cells versus normal cells. What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet consists of high fat, with moderate to low protein content, and very low carbohydrates, which forces the body to burn fat instead of glucose for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Generally, the ratio by weight is 3:1 or 4:1 fat to carbohydrate+protein, yielding a diet that has an energy dis Continue reading >>

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? Burning Fat Instead Of Sugar

What Is The Ketogenic Diet? Burning Fat Instead Of Sugar

In this 2 part article I will firstly explain what a ketogenic diet is and then share my personal story of what lead me to this diet and how it could help people prevent disease and maintain better health for many people. Don’t think for a minute that I’m blindly recommending this diet for everyone, as it’s most certainly not. I’ll explain why later in this article. First things first, what is ketosis? To understand what this diet is, we firstly need to understand what ketosis is and how it works in the human body. There are two metabolic states that our body can utilise energy and they are glycolysis (blood glucose) and ketosis (ketone bodies). Mild ketosis starts from about 0.5mm of blood ketones (add chart). Our normal default setting is glycolysis providing we’re not eating a ketogenic style of diet or on a prolonged period of fasting. Ketosis is our body’s natural survival mechanism, which will start burning body fat for energy, when all the glucose stores in our body are empty. 1 This can happen when you go for a prolonged period without food or through nutritional strategies such as limiting the amount of carbohydrates and proteins that are consumed on a daily basis. When this gets implemented, your body becomes very efficient at burning fat for energy. The liver converts fat into ketones, which supplies energy for the body and the brain. 2, 3 Side note: Please do not confuse ketoacidosis with ketosis, they are two very different metabolic states, but commonly confused. What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is essentially a very low carbohydrate diet, with moderate amounts of protein and high levels of fat. Fat becomes your major fuel source, much like carbohydrates are in a common western diet. The macronutrient breakdown for a “modern/standar Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketogenic Diet And Food Intake Control: A Complex Relationship

Ketosis, Ketogenic Diet And Food Intake Control: A Complex Relationship

Introduction Hunger and satiety are two important mechanisms involved in body weight regulation. Even though humans can regulate food intake by will, there are systems within the central nervous system (CNS) that regulate food intake and energy expenditure. This complex network, whose control center is spread over different brain areas, receives information from adipose tissue, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and from blood and peripheral sensory receptors. The actions of the brain's hunger/satiety centers are influenced by nutrients, hormones and other signaling molecules. Ketone bodies are the major source of energy in the periods of fasting and/or carbohydrate shortage and might play a role in food intake control. Hypothalamic Control of Feeding/Appetite/Hunger The hypothalamus is the brain's main center responsible for hunger/satiety (H/S) control. In the theory that Mayer proposed more than 60 years ago, he assigned a central role to glucose levels in the H/S control: the so-called “glucostatic theory” (Mayer, 1955). Mayer suggested that depletion of carbohydrate availability leads to hunger, and the hypothalamic centers with receptors sensitive to glucose levels might be involved in the short-term regulation of energy intake (Mayer, 1955). The “feeding center” in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), according to the glucostatic theory, reacts to the between-meal fall of blood glucose and stimulates food intake. The LHA contains glucose-inhibited neurons that are stimulated by hypoglycemia, a process crucial to mediating the hyperphagia normally induced by hypoglycemia. The subsequent post-prandial hyperglycemia activates the “satiety center” in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), which contains glucose-excited neurons and inhibits both “feeding ce Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis: Metabolic Flexibility In Action

Ketosis is an energy state that your body uses to provide an alternative fuel when glucose availability is low. It happens to all humans when fasting or when carbohydrate intake is lowered. The process of creating ketones is a normal metabolic alternative designed to keep us alive if we go without food for long periods of time. Eating a diet low in carb and higher in fat enhances this process without the gnawing hunger of fasting. Let’s talk about why ketones are better than glucose for most cellular fuel needs. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Body Fuel Basics Normal body cells metabolize food nutrients and oxygen during cellular “respiration”, a set of metabolic pathways in which ATP (adenosine triphosphate), our main cellular energy source is created. Most of this energy production happens in the mitochondria, tiny cell parts which act as powerhouses or fueling stations. There are two primary types of food-based fuel that our cells can use to produce energy: The first cellular fuel is glucose, which is commonly known as blood sugar. Glucose is a product of the starches and sugars (carbohydrates) and protein in our diet. This fuel system is necessary, but it has a limitation. The human body can only store about 1000-1600 calories of glucose in the form of glycogen in our muscles and liver. The amounts stored depend on how much muscle mass is available. Men will be able to store more because they have a greater muscle mass. Since most people use up about 2000 calories a day just being and doing normal stuff, you can see that if the human body depended on only sugar to fuel itself, and food weren’t available for more than a day, the body would run Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Metabolism Control

Ketosis For Metabolism Control

We know that simply counting calories doesn’t work for weight loss. The threadbare ideas of “calories in versus calories out” and “just eat less and exercise more” are outdated concepts, and not effective long-term. However we do know that the quality of your diet has a tremendous impact on your hormones, satiety, and body composition. In this article, we cover how ketosis for metabolic control wins out over other ways to try and lose fat. How Ketosis Changes Metabolism Let’s do a very quick overview of metabolism in the context of ketosis: When the average person eats, their body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose to be used as energy for all functions of the body. In this case, carbohydrates provide the main fuel source for the body. But when someone is in ketosis, either from eating a ketogenic diet or from fasting, their body is instead breaking down fats into ketone bodies for energy. These ketone bodies are then used to provide the body with a constant source of energy instead of carbs. Being in ketosis allows you to literally shift your metabolism. Now, let’s look at some of the powerful ways ketosis can be used for maintaining a healthy metabolism: Calorie Restriction Versus Ketosis As we prefaced above, simply reducing calories to lose weight is not effective. We know this based on research from people like Gary Taubes. And that’s just part of the story: it can actually be harmful to your metabolism and lower metabolic rate (the amount of calories the body burns per day) — just look at the long-term results from past winners of the Biggest Loser. After forcing the body into caloric reduction, the contestants’ metabolisms dropped, leading to weight loss plateaus and weight regain. In contrast, research has also shown that when we fast, th Continue reading >>

Does Fasting To Get Into Ketosis Really Work?

Does Fasting To Get Into Ketosis Really Work?

If you have finally acknowledged the benefits of Ketogenic diet and gung-ho to start the diet, you must be wondering what is the fastest way to get your body into ketosis. Since, Ketosis resembles the body’s starvation survival mechanism, many people ask if fasting to get into ketosis really work? For those who don’t know, Ketosis is a natural process in which the body starts burning fat for energy instead of the usual source carbohydrates, thus allowing faster fat burn and quicker weight loss. If you are desperate to get onto ketosis, for whatever reason, the answer for you is extremely simple. Go on a complete 3-day fast! Yes, if you fast completely i.e., absolutely zero food over the next 3 days, your body will go on survival mode and automatically trigger ketosis. However, we wouldn’t recommend it as it is not healthy and you may develop some health concern in the process. Your motive is to reach this concentration of Ketone in the body: However, we recommend a rather gradual, more effective, and healthier way to get into Ketosis. Try our 3-day program to get into Ketosis for free. Although complete fasting might give you the desired result, it might lead to more complications. Thus, it is better that you stick to intermittent fasting instead. Begin with a 16 hour fast by skipping all meals from the night of Day 0 till 4 PM on Day 1. This will allow your to burn the existing carbs in the body and prepare your body for ketosis. You should continue intermittent over the next few days as well. But, you can reduce the hours of fasting. For instance, you may choose to skip any 1 meal within the day. Additionally, during your intermittent fasts you may include exogenous products into your diet to quicken the process. Though we usually recommend our clients to use na Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Food List • What Is Keto Diet?

Ketogenic Food List • What Is Keto Diet?

Note: There are affiliate links in this post. See full disclosure. I’ve created this full Ketogenic food list of allowed and not allowed foods + all there is to know about the Ketogenic Diet. Do you feel like your normal body energy is all over the place? Are you constantly losing focus after a meal containing high levels of carbohydrates? Well, try to consider the Ketogenic Diet, also known as Keto for short. Just like the normal diet, this one aids in weight loss and is considered a fat loss diet. However, it is not really like the average diet. It stands out on so many levels. It comes with its own Ketogenic food list, see below. Keto diet is famous for improving the health of people suffering from cancer, epilepsy, and Alzheimer’s disease and many other health issues (see below). It is simple yet requires paying attention to what you eat. What is Keto Diet? (Low-Carb, fat loss diet) The Keto diet is a diet where you eat very low amounts of carbohydrates, moderate amounts of proteins, and a high amount of fats. It seems like you are cutting down on all the good stuff, but this is actually more beneficial to your health than most diets. Most people are generally addicted to carbohydrates (learn about good carbs vs bad carbs) and sugars, especially those of the working class due to the high energy levels they have to sustain and the minimal free time they get. However, this diet is sure to wean you off this addiction sooner than you think. The Nitty-Gritty Details about Ketogenic Diet….. The main benefit of this is the amount of glycogen this diet allows you to accumulate in the body. Glycogen from carbohydrates and all other macronutrients end up stored in the body. Therefore, fat levels in the body are burnt-out for energy, which the diet boosts. The body loses Continue reading >>

Is The High-fat, Low-carb Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

Is The High-fat, Low-carb Ketogenic Diet Right For You?

In the past several years, as measured by Google Trends, interest in an unusual style of eating called the ketogenic diet has tripled, and chances are you have a friend or coworker who’s tried it. Early adopters are typically people who run or ride a lot and want a food plan that doesn’t just fill their tanks but also boosts performance. Followers scarf eggs, cheese, and olive oil in hunger-killing quantities, turning their backs on just about every carb other than vegetables. They don’t use half-and-half in their coffee—they use heavy cream. Still, they’re likely to look a little lean, since the ketogenic diet turns them into 24/7 fat burners. (Even while surfing the couch.) And don’t be surprised if they report feeling better and stronger than ever. Ketones are a type of organic substance that includes ketone bodies, a collective name for the three molecules that are produced naturally by the liver when it breaks down fat for energy, a process that the ketogenic diet jump-starts. Under normal circumstances—that is, if you’re eating a standard, balanced diet—your body gets most of its energy by turning carbohydrates into glucose, which cells then convert to energy. If you significantly reduce carb intake (typically to less than 50 grams per day), your body undergoes a fundamental change: it starts relying on fat-generated ketone bodies as its primary energy source. The brain, heart, and muscles can all burn ketone bodies efficiently if you’ve been eating this way for a month or so. This metabolic state is called ketosis. Historically used as a driver of weight loss, carb restriction has recently gained favor in ultra-endurance circles and the military’s Special Forces. The idea is to radically crank up fat burning so that athletes and soldiers are Continue reading >>

Why Go On A Ketogenic Diet

Why Go On A Ketogenic Diet

The latest low carb fad is definitely nutritional ketosis. You’ve probably heard about it and are wondering, why go on a ketogenic diet. Ketosis is an innate part of our biology. It’s a metabolic state in which the body has shifted from using glucose as its primary fuel source into burning fat for fuel. Our body is made to burn fat. The adipose tissue acts like a black hole with infinite storage capacity. Any surplus calorie we don’t need right away gets deposited for future use. When in ketosis, we’ll be withdrawing energy from our own body fat to maintain a caloric balance. In the ancestral landscape, it would happen at times of food scarcity. Nutritional ketosis is the tool that helps us to survive famine and is an evolutionary mechanism. After the agricultural revolution, food has become more than abundant. We have year-round access to calories and scarcity has become a thing of the past. In addition to that, those calories are mainly derived from sugar. Because nutritional ketosis can only be induced by the lack of carbohydrates, this metabolic pathway has become deviant. Being in a constantly fed state and burning only glucose teaches the body to become dependent of it. Every function of an organism is there for a reason and the result of necessity. If there isn’t a way to start using fat for fuel, then ketosis won’t occur. What’s wrong with that? It doesn’t look like we’ll be facing famine any time soon, but losing this vital mechanism would be very detrimental. That’s why go into ketosis, at least every once in a while. The reason, why go on a ketogenic diet, isn’t only about survival. Its greatest benefits are not losing body fat or increasing your chances to make it, once sh*t hits the fan. The difference between burning sugar and fat is Continue reading >>

Are There Different Types Of Ketosis?

Are There Different Types Of Ketosis?

Before reading this, if you haven’t already, I suggest reading What is a Ketogenic Diet and Understanding Ketosis so you will have a stronger understanding of what it means to be in a state of ketosis. The next step necessary in comprehending the ketogenic diet is learning the different types of ketosis that can occur. For this article, we will refer to three different forms of ketosis: fasting ketosis, nutritional ketosis, and pathological ketosis. The different types of ketosis vary in their degree of ketone production as well as their method of induction. Fasting Ketosis The idea of fasting has been around for hundreds of years and played a major part in the origins of the ketogenic diet. In fact, many great philosophers, such as Hippocrates, Socrates, and Aristotle, all praised the many benefits of fasting. Paracelsus, physician and father of toxicology, was quoted saying, “Fasting is the greatest remedy—the physician within.” While these early scientists and philosophers were definitely ahead of the game in recognizing the potential of fasting, the mechanisms were still yet to be understood. Ketosis tends to occur when insulin and blood glucose levels decrease to an extent that allows for increased fat oxidation, which is ultimately followed by greater ketone production. A minor state of ketosis can occur following periods of complete food restriction, such as an overnight fast. This may produce ketone levels around 0.1 mmol/L to 0.03 mmol/L. Shorter duration fasts typically will not raise ketone levels above these levels because the rate of ketone metabolism matches ketone synthesis. As the fast continues, the rate of ketone production exceeds ketone clearance, resulting in an increase in blood ketone levels (1). While a minor state of ketosis can occur du Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality And Improves Memory In Aging Mice

Ketogenic Diet Reduces Midlife Mortality And Improves Memory In Aging Mice

Summary Ketogenic diets recapitulate certain metabolic aspects of dietary restriction such as reliance on fatty acid metabolism and production of ketone bodies. We investigated whether an isoprotein ketogenic diet (KD) might, like dietary restriction, affect longevity and healthspan in C57BL/6 male mice. We find that Cyclic KD, KD alternated weekly with the Control diet to prevent obesity, reduces midlife mortality but does not affect maximum lifespan. A non-ketogenic high-fat diet (HF) fed similarly may have an intermediate effect on mortality. Cyclic KD improves memory performance in old age, while modestly improving composite healthspan measures. Gene expression analysis identifies downregulation of insulin, protein synthesis, and fatty acid synthesis pathways as mechanisms common to KD and HF. However, upregulation of PPARα target genes is unique to KD, consistent across tissues, and preserved in old age. In all, we show that a non-obesogenic ketogenic diet improves survival, memory, and healthspan in aging mice. To access this article, please choose from the options below Now available: purchase access to all research journal HTML articles for 6 or 36 hours. Click here to explore this opportunity. Purchase Access to this Article If you are a current subscriber with Society Membership or an Account Number, claim your access now. Subscribe to this Journal Continue reading >>

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Ketosis In An Evolutionary Context

Humans are unique in their remarkable ability to enter ketosis. They’re also situated near the top of the food chain. Coincidence? During starvation, humans rapidly enter ketosis; they do this better than king penguins, and bears don’t do it at all. Starvation ketosis Humans maintain a high level of functionality during starvation. We can still hunt & plan; some would even argue it’s a more finely tuned state, cognitively. And that’s important, because if we became progressively weaker and slower, chances of acquiring food would rapidly decline. Perhaps this is why fasting bears just sleep most of the time: no ketones = no bueno..? Animals with a low brain/carcass weight ratio (ie, small brain) don’t need it. Babies and children have a higher brain/carcass weight ratio, so they develop ketosis more rapidly than adults. Is this a harmful process? No, more likely an evolutionary adaptation which supports the brain. The brain of newborn babies consumes a huge amount of total daily energy, and nearly half comes from ketones. A week or so later, even after the carbohydrate content of breast milk increases, they still don’t get “kicked out of ketosis” (Bourneres et al., 1986). If this were a harmful state, why would Nature have done this? …and all those anecdotes, like babies learn at incredibly rapid rates… coincidence? Maybe they’re myths. Maybe not. Ketosis in the animal kingdom Imagine a hibernating bear: huge adipose tissue but small brain fuel requirement relative to body size and total energy expenditure. No ketosis, because brain accounts for less than 5% of total metabolism. In adult humans, this is around 19-23%, and babies are much higher (eg, Cahill and Veech, 2003 & Hayes et al., 2012). For the rest of this article and more, head over to Pat Continue reading >>

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