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Ketosis Sleep Quality

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

A common question I get asked after clients start a ketogenic diet is “why do I feel lousy?” Like them, you’re probably thinking going keto will provide an immediate mental and physical boost. For some, it will. For others, you may experience adverse symptoms, also known as the “keto flu”. When you start a very low-carb ketogenic diet, you’ll flush water and sodium out of your body in the first few weeks. As your sodium levels fall, so too will potassium levels. This can leave you feeling tired, sluggish, and wondering what you got yourself into. Fear not, it’s only temporary. Here are some suggestions for avoiding key mineral deficiencies when jumping into a ketogenic diet. Sodium One of the biggest health and nutrition “myths” is that you should avoid salt. If you’re fit, healthy, and following a keto diet you’ll lose water and sodium in the first few weeks. For athletes, this problem can be compounded because you also lose sodium through your sweat, and as your sweat rate increases, your sodium and blood volume will decline. Not a good recipe for optimal energy and performance. On the flip side, if you’re overweight, out of shape or in poor health then your body is likely already holding on to too much sodium from high consumption of packaged and processed foods (i.e. sodium is used as the primary preservative) or from chronically elevated insulin levels. Therefore, a low-carb or keto approach is great way to restore healthy levels. Symptoms of low sodium include fatigue, headaches, compromised ability to perform (especially outdoors in the heat) and in more serious cases you may pass out. Remember that most of the sodium in your body is found in your bloodstream, so if your body gets deficient, you don’t have many reserves to tap into. In t Continue reading >>

Video: Insomnia On Keto

Video: Insomnia On Keto

Insomnia is the worst. And, when you’ve gone keto and start to feel better overall but your sleep quality starts to suck, it’s an even worse place to be in. You feel great on low-carb keto, but when you eat low-carb keto, your sleep suffers. Perhaps you know that eating carbohydrates fixes your sleep quality problem. Maybe when you ‘fall off the wagon’ and eat all of the carbohydrates, you have the best sleep that night but wake up feeling less than awesome because carbohydrates don’t feel good in your body. Girl, I’ve been there. And it SUCKED. No amount of extra magnesium, or melatonin sprays, liquids or capsules fixed the problem. If you’re experiencing insonia on low-carb/keto diet and you’re looking for solutions that allow you to feel good on your ketogenic diet while also getting the best sleep of your life, you need to watch today’s keto video. For video transcript PDF, scroll down. Your Mini Guide & Transcript A 5-10 page PDF with the transcript for this keto video, resources, and exclusive steps to taking your keto fat burning to the next level. Download to your device and access anytime. Simply click the button above, enter your details, and the guide will be delivered to your inbox! Get the keto mini guide & transcript now. Highlights… Signs that keto is affecting sleep Steps to end insomnia on keto The ultimate reason why you’re experiencing insomnia on keto Resources… Supplement: magnesium glycinate Does your sleep suck since going low-carb, keto? Which of the steps that I shared are you going to try first? My team and I work on finding the best products that not only have quality ingredients, but care about their customers. It has taken us years to find products with ingredients and integrity that I can stand behind. These brands w Continue reading >>

How To Cure Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like A Baby Tonight

How To Cure Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like A Baby Tonight

How to CURE Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like a Baby TONIGHT How to CURE Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like a Baby TONIGHT Ugh, keto insomnia is by far the most stressful side-effect that I have experienced since I started the ketogenic diet. Hint: it wasn't only keto's fault, there were other factors included, which you are probably guilty of if you are reading right now instead of sleeping. And if you really fall asleep, you have very light sleep and you wake up several times during the night? We can survive a couple of days of problematic sleep, but after that, it just becomes unbearable. You roll around the bed like a crazy person and start analyzing your whole life, while somewhere in the background you can hear classical German yodelling. When you wake up in the morning, you feel like you have partied the whole weekend and after that, you got hit by a firetruck, twice. And this loop continues and gets worse day after day. My first conclusion was that this is probably keto's fault right? Before we dive deep into how and why keto affects your sleep, let's go over the basics. Insomnia is a sleep disorder where individuals find it difficult to fall asleep, waking up frequently during the night or waking up too early due to a number of factors. It's typically followed by daytime sleepiness, low energy, irritability, and depressed mood. [1] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that one for every three adults gets enough sleep regularly. That means more than third of Americans are sleep deprived on a regular basis. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society have recommended for optimal health and well-being, adults should get at least 7 hours of sleep every night. [2] Sleeping less than 7 hours is associated with increased Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Insomnia

The Ketogenic Diet And Insomnia

Ketogenic diets like the popular Atkins diet cause rapid weight loss by sending the body into a condition known as ketosis. Unfortunately, they may also lead to health problems, including insomnia or poor quality sleep. The relationship between ketosis and insomnia is not fully understood, since much of the evidence for the link is anecdotal, but a better understanding of ketogenic diets and healthy sleep may help you make the right decisions about your weight-loss plan. Speak with your doctor if your insomnia is chronic, and before starting any weight-loss regimen. Video of the Day A ketogenic diet is high in fat and low in carbohydrates and protein. A healthy body burns carbohydrates for energy, so if no dietary carbohydrates are present, it turns to the energy stores glycogen and fat, leading to rapid weight loss. When fat tissues break down, carbon fragments called ketones are released into the blood, causing ketosis. Weight loss can be rapid in the beginning, which may cause the often-reported sense of euphoria and unusually high energy. This may contribute to sleep problems. Insomnia is a difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, or a pattern of chronically poor sleep. The condition can be caused by mental states like anxiety or depression, substance abuse, hormonal or lifestyle changes and some medications or illnesses. Dietary factors like caffeine or other stimulants, or changes in diet, can also play a part. Insomnia can often be treated with lifestyle changes like stress reduction, exercise, and quitting caffeine, tobacco and alcohol consumption. Alternative treatments like acupuncture and massage may be helpful. If you suffer from insomnia, see your doctor to rule out any underlying issues. Carbohydrates, Ketosis and Sleep Carbohydrates are often known as Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

What mistakes are you making when it comes to your health? I know I’ve been making plenty. That’s why I’m tracking my data in this recent ketosis experiment that I’m doing. What about you? Most people think that the ketogenic diet is just “low-carb” which leads them to make many mistakes that prevent them from not reaping all of the benefits of ketosis that they could. What benefits? How about an improved immune system, increased longevity, lower inflammation, effortless weight loss, decreased hunger, reduced risk for disease and more. Read on to know the top 10 ways that people make mistakes with ketosis and how you can prevent them. 1: Not tracking protein intake By far the biggest problem with a ketogenic diet is not tracking how much protein you are eating. The far majority of people are simply eating too much lean protein, which ends up kicking them out of ketosis. Protein can turn into carbs by a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis, meaning “making new carbs.” This then spikes insulin, and reduces ketone levels. Even though you are eating super low carb, this could make your body switch back and forth between energy systems, which will lead to high levels of fatigue or “low carb flu.” The easiest way to avoid this mistake is by tracking your ketone levels to see how you respond to different amounts and different types of meat. Everyone is different, so the only way you can tell is by tracking. I “listened to my body” before and it didn’t work. I wasn’t in ketosis when I thought I was. I also thought ketosis kind of sucked. It didn’t, I was just wrong. The only way you know is by tracking. If you consume more fat with protein, it will slow this effect. So think fattier cuts of meat, and less muscle meat. But wait, are you going to Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets And Sleep Quality

Low Carb Diets And Sleep Quality

We all know that while training is important for promoting increases in our muscle strength and fitness ability, sleep is also critical. Sleep is primetime in terms of recovery for the body and if you’re not experiencing enough sleep or sleep that is of good quality, chances are you’re not making maximum gains from your training sessions. What The Research Is Telling Us That said, new research is proving that the type of sleep you get can be affected by the foods you’re eating. Recently, researchers out of the University of Sydney, Australia looked at the effects low-carb diets had on sleep quality. The study was designed so that two groups of non-obese men, 7 men in each group, were given two different diets one that was low carb and another that was mixed in terms of macronutrients. Both diets contained 2400 calories and had matching evening test meals that were either mixed low-fat, higher carbohydrate meals (15.5% protein, 12.5% fat, and 72% carbohydrate) or very low carbohydrate meals (38% protein, 61% fat, and 1% protein). During the study, sleep was recorded using a computerized sleep system. During this time the urine ketone level was monitored with reagent strips both before the evening meals and right before bed to determine whether ketosis was present among the low carb group. Blood glucose was also assessed with a glucometer before the evening meal and in the two hours following, and hunger was measured immediately after the bedtime meal was consumed. Results After the study was completed, the results showed that the very low carb eaters had a much lower proportion of REM sleep (dream sleep) in comparison to the mixed group. In addition to this, the amount of slow wave sleep increased among those who were following the low carb diet, especially when in Continue reading >>

How I Fixed The Biggest Ketosis Mistakes

How I Fixed The Biggest Ketosis Mistakes

The ketogenic diet isn’t always as easy as it seems. I tried for a long time, but not until I dove deep into the research and found out how to fix all of the common mistakes was I able to enjoy the full state of ketosis. This article is to help you avoid those same mistakes. Why Try the Ketogenic Diet First, why would you want to even try ketosis? I truly enjoy trying diets and eating methodologies to research what I like and what works for me. I’ve experimented with low-carb diets, high-carb diets, and everything in between, but I’ve never cut them out to the point to achieve ketosis. What’s most exciting about the ketogenic diet to me is that, yes, it’s amazing for weight loss, but it’s not just a “diet.” Ketosis is literally a state of metabolism. You are either in or you’re out. I wanted to see and feel for myself the benefits everyone is talking about from going full Keto. My Keto Coach has a great line that goes like this: I was sold and needed to try this and commit. If you are new to researching ketosis, a quick review of the popular benefits: Mental Clarity [2] Fat Loss [2][3][4] Feeling Full [1][2] Better Sleep [1] Better Mood [1] Better Skin [4] The list goes on and on, including disease and inflammation reduction, better cholesterol, etc. For my purposes I didn’t care about weight loss or fat loss, I just cared about doing the diet the best I could, and to do that, I needed to prepare accordingly. Preparation Stage – Learning the Keto Basics Here is what I did to educate myself and prepare for six weeks of the Ketogenic Diet. I picked a start date and spent $30 at In-N-Out burger on a massive send-off to carbohydrates. A whole other post could be dedicated to the mistakes I made at In-N-Out. After this epic meal, it was officially time Continue reading >>

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind The Scenes Data On The Ketogenic Diet

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind The Scenes Data On The Ketogenic Diet

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind the Scenes Data on the Ketogenic Diet I’ve tried a lot of diets. I first went vegetarian, then slow carb, then gluten-free, then Paleo. I even did a 28-day Chipotle diet, which is exactly as awesome as it sounds. Eventually I found the Ketogenic diet. For me, like for many people in our communities, this all started with a health concern. I was born with a heart condition. It never impacted my life, but it was there, lingering. When I was a junior in college, a few classmates and I were out enjoying late night pizza. Out of nowhere, one classmate suddenly jolted upright and fell off his stool. He died. I found out the next morning it was from a lingering heart condition, not too unlike my own. I started to think about my health a lot more after that. I read about nutrition and started exploring the confusing world of diets. As I learned more and as I became more involved in Quantified Self, I found myself wanting to quantify these diets. That’s what drew me to Keto. It’s the most measurable diet. Quick Summary of the Ketogenic Diet Keto is a high-fat, very-low-carb diet, usually with 70% of calories coming from fat. The idea is to switch your body from using glucose as its primary energy to breaking down fats into ketones for energy. You can measure the macros that you eat and you can measure the ketones in your urine, breath, and blood. In 2013, I did my first experiment with the ketogenic diet. In that experiment, I tracked everything I ate in MyFitnessPal and compared it to other data I was collecting. I found my energy increased, my sleep quality went up (according to my Zeo data), my cholesterol levels improved, and my food cravings went away. However, I also found that measuring everything I ate was a pain, I didn’t really kn Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Explained

The Ketogenic Diet Explained

What is a Ketogenic Diet? People seem to have the notion that every low carb diet is a ketogenic diet but that's just wrong. Not every low carb diet lets you go into ketosis, but a ketogenic diet is always a low carb diet. So, what is this thing they call a Ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet usually recommended for weight loss, among other functions. Those who promote the diet claim a person can lose weight by avoiding foods high in carbs and supplement them instead with moderate amounts of protein and high amounts of healthy fats. In fact, studies have shown how low-carb diets are effective for weight loss and can actually lead to a whole roster of health improvements. And no, you don’t need to count the calories. High Fat Low Carb Diet vs. Ketogenic Diet Is every high-fat, low-carb diet a ketogenic diet? The short answer is no. Being on a low-carb diet means to consume carbs at a lower amount compared to the average diet, particularly the Western diet. There is no real measure, but experts say you have to limit carb consumption to 100-150 g to call anything a low-carb diet. On the other hand, a ketogenic diet is all about ketosis and experts say you need to limit carb intake to not more than 50 g to maintain ketosis. Some even say ketosis only happens when you go as low as 20 g per day which is considered ultra-low. Again, the difference between a typical high-fat low-carb diet and a ketogenic diet is the end goal. A high-fat low-carb diet's purpose is to simply limit carb intake while a person who is on a ketogenic diet should strive to be in a constant state of ketosis. The range of carbs vary but a ketogenic diet is much more restrictive than your typical high-fat, low-carb diet. Ketosis The end goal of a ketogenic diet is for th Continue reading >>

So, Apparently I Don't Sleep Anymore ...

So, Apparently I Don't Sleep Anymore ...

I am in Ketosis (checked with Ketostix). For the past two and a half weeks, I haven't really been sleeping. I probably REM cycle a whopping 5 hours every night, sometimes 4, and occasionally 6-7. When I wake up I still feel a bit tired, but I'm 'awake' if that makes sense ... I have read that people on Ketosis sleep less but I'm a bit apprehensive about this dramatic change (I usually/use to sleep 8-9 hours a night). Other info: Not hungry. I don't eat nearly as much. For instance, yesterday I ate 2 eggs, 1/2 cup ground beef, 2 small round steaks (the thin tenderized kind, probably about .4 lb total ... maybe less), and 1/8 of an avocado. 20 pounds to lose? Don't have a scale ... haven't checked in a year ... I lift weights, moderately, 3-4 times a week. I run-walk every other day. (Note: I am not giving up running. I do not care if cardio isn't all that great. I love to run. I will continue to do so.) I drink Kombucha everyday (home brew). Vitamin D supplement Natural Calm supplement 2 weeks sober from coffee ... :p My job requires me to stand most of the day (M-F) and go up and down scaffolds, thus, quite active. That's all I can think of to add ... So, my question: What the heck is going on? Should I be concerned with this lack of sleep (darn you Lights Out for raising my cortisol!)? What should I do differently, if anything? EDIT: The cortisol I mentioned in respect to Lights Out was a joke ... as in ... reading it raised my cortisol levels because I'm not sleeping and that is a detriment according to the book ... just a clarification (I'm unsure if it's been taken the wrong way, if so, my bad.) Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes! Continue reading >>

Heres How The Keto Can Affect Your Sleep - Insider

Heres How The Keto Can Affect Your Sleep - Insider

The keto diet has numerous benefits, and a few downfalls, too, just as any diet does. In the short-term, the keto diet can cause interrupted sleep and insomnia. Insomnia caused by the keto diet is attributed to low levels of serotonin and melatonin, as well as higher than normal energy levels. Long-term, the keto diet can lead to deeper sleep and less required sleep overall. By now, youve probably heard of the keto diet . The keto diet can impact your weight, skin, mental health, and risk of disease in beneficial ways, but did you know that the keto diet can affect your sleep patterns, too? Its much better to know what to expect going into the keto diet than to be surprised when your sleep pattern shifts once you get started. After all, sleep can hugely impact your overall health, and youll want to be prepared. Heres how the keto diet can affect your sleep. It's, of course, worth noting that everyone's experiences on the diet will be different and that you should be consulting with your doctor before starting any diet plan. In the short-term, the keto diet can negatively impact your sleep. The keto diet might cause some insomnia at first. Continue reading >>

Is A Ketogenic Diet For Women’s Health The Right Choice?

Is A Ketogenic Diet For Women’s Health The Right Choice?

The ketogenic diet is no longer thought of as just a “fad diet.” A ketogenic diet for the management of many health issues -from diabetes, to weight management, and for women’s health- is becoming a regular part of medical practice and nutritional counseling. In one form or another, and by one name or another, the keto diet has been recommended by physicians and other medical professionals since the 1920’s. Not only to address weight control, but to augment treatment of patients with serious illnesses. The National Stem Cell Institute, a leading U.S. regenerative medicine clinic, reports that its medical professionals have seen firsthand how healing is often significantly improved when stem cell therapy and a ketogenic diet for specific illnesses, injuries, or chronic disorders are paired. But does a keto diet make sense for women’s health, both in general and for specific issues? Word of mouth has brought the benefits of the ketogenic diet for weight management to the fore. Certainly, the public’s interest in the keto diet has been on the rise. Word of mouth has brought the benefits of the ketogenic diet for weight management to the fore. And it certainly does live up to its reputation as a way to promote weight loss by flipping the body’s dependence on burning carbs to burning fat. But the keto diet’s health benefits don’t begin or end there. There has long been an established history of healing linked to it, including its ability to reduce the risk of developing diabetes, increasing energy, and protecting against various types of age-related neurological disease. Yet, in spite of the established research, many people are still unsure if a ketogenic diet for addressing women’s health issues is a wise choice. Part of the reason for the public uncert Continue reading >>

The Keto Craze And Your Sleep

The Keto Craze And Your Sleep

Youve tried all the popular diets: Weight Watchers, Nutrisystem, shake replacements. The options are endless, but it doesnt mean you have found the right fit for your body. With a little homework, a ketogenic diet could be the key to a healthier you with the added bonus of a full nights sleep. Studies from National Institutes of Health show ketogenic diets can drastically lower blood sugar and improve insulin resistance, helping to improve diabetes and prediabetes. It can also improve heart disease including the lowering of blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar. And keto is being usedand increasingly studiedas a dietary therapy for epilepsy , cancer , and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons. With all the health benefits, what exactly is keto? Today we are going to share the terminology, provide food options to get you started, and discover how it helps you sleep better. According to Diet Doctor, the ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it allows the body to produce small fuel molecules called ketones. This is an alternative fuel source for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. How does it break down you are asking? The normal keto diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent protein , and 5 percent carbohydrates. A modified, high-protein version of keto adjusts the fat-protein ratio: 60 percent fat, 35 percent protein, and 5 percent carbs. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to blood sugar). The liver produces ketones from fat. These ketones then serve as a fuel source throughout the body, especially for the brain. Your entire body switches its fuel supply to run mostly on fat, bu Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet & Sleep Problems: How Are Carbohydrates And Ketosis Associated With Disturbed Sleep?

Ketogenic Diet & Sleep Problems: How Are Carbohydrates And Ketosis Associated With Disturbed Sleep?

A diet which is rich in fat and low in proteins and carbohydrates is called a ketogenic diet. Going on a ketogenic diet is one of the ways people revert to in order to achieve quick weight loss. While ketogenic diet can have adverse consequences to a person's well being, it can also lead to sleep deprivation or insomnia over a period of time. Consumption of carbohydrates is vital for the body that not only keeps the energy equilibrium maintained, but also plays a role in your quality of sleep. If you are planning to adopt ketogenic diet then beware my friend of the complications it can have in the long run over your sleep cycle! Maintaining a good body is essential, but it should not compromise with your sleep which is vital for your health and well being. Herein, we break down some valuable information on how ketogenic diet can be associated with sleep disturbances and how it can be managed. A diet which is rich in fat and low in proteins and carbohydrates is called a ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are called storehouse of energy as their breakdown results in enormous energy released by the body needed for performing its functions. In absence of these dietary carbs, the glycogen and fat is broken down thereby causing enormous loss of weight. It is during fat breakdown that causes release of ketones in blood also known as ketosis. The weight loss of a person of a ketogenic diet can be sudden and high in intensity often causing euphoric feeling, but leading to sleep problems over a period of time. Known to cause a soothing effect on the body, carbohydrates are often referred to as "comfort foods" in dietary terms. These carbs are responsible for maintaining steady glucose supply, maintaining energy equilibrium and at the same time keeping the protein balance in the brain. Continue reading >>

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

Last week, my staff nutritionist Laura Schoenfeld wrote a guest post for my blog called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health”. Perhaps not surprisingly, it has caused quite a stir. For reasons I don’t fully understand, some people identify so strongly with how many carbohydrates they eat that they take offense when a suggestion is made that low-carb diets may not be appropriate for everyone, in all circumstances. In these circles low-carb diets have become dogma (i.e. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true). Followers of this strange religious sect insist that everyone should be on low-carb or even ketogenic diets; that all carbohydrates, regardless of their source, are “toxic”; that most traditional hunter-gatherer (e.g. Paleolithic) societies followed a low-carb diet; and, similarly, that nutritional ketosis—which is only achievable with a very high-fat, low-carb, and low-protein diet—is our default and optimal physiological state. Cut through the confusion and hype and learn what research can tell us about low-carb diets. On the other hand, I’ve also observed somewhat of a backlash against low-carb diets occurring in the blogosphere of late. While I agree with many of the potential issues that have been raised about low-carb diets, and think it’s important to discuss them, I also feel it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that low-carb diets can be very effective therapeutic tools for certain conditions and in certain situations. With this in mind, here are 7 things I think everyone should know about low-carb diets. #1: Paleo does not equal low-carb, and very low-carb/ketogenic diets are not our “default” nutritional state, as some have claimed. Some low-carb advocates have claimed that mo Continue reading >>

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