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Ketosis Sleep Quality

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind The Scenes Data On The Ketogenic Diet

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind The Scenes Data On The Ketogenic Diet

Tracking Blood Ketones: Behind the Scenes Data on the Ketogenic Diet I’ve tried a lot of diets. I first went vegetarian, then slow carb, then gluten-free, then Paleo. I even did a 28-day Chipotle diet, which is exactly as awesome as it sounds. Eventually I found the Ketogenic diet. For me, like for many people in our communities, this all started with a health concern. I was born with a heart condition. It never impacted my life, but it was there, lingering. When I was a junior in college, a few classmates and I were out enjoying late night pizza. Out of nowhere, one classmate suddenly jolted upright and fell off his stool. He died. I found out the next morning it was from a lingering heart condition, not too unlike my own. I started to think about my health a lot more after that. I read about nutrition and started exploring the confusing world of diets. As I learned more and as I became more involved in Quantified Self, I found myself wanting to quantify these diets. That’s what drew me to Keto. It’s the most measurable diet. Quick Summary of the Ketogenic Diet Keto is a high-fat, very-low-carb diet, usually with 70% of calories coming from fat. The idea is to switch your body from using glucose as its primary energy to breaking down fats into ketones for energy. You can measure the macros that you eat and you can measure the ketones in your urine, breath, and blood. In 2013, I did my first experiment with the ketogenic diet. In that experiment, I tracked everything I ate in MyFitnessPal and compared it to other data I was collecting. I found my energy increased, my sleep quality went up (according to my Zeo data), my cholesterol levels improved, and my food cravings went away. However, I also found that measuring everything I ate was a pain, I didn’t really kn Continue reading >>

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

A common question I get asked after clients start a ketogenic diet is “why do I feel lousy?” Like them, you’re probably thinking going keto will provide an immediate mental and physical boost. For some, it will. For others, you may experience adverse symptoms, also known as the “keto flu”. When you start a very low-carb ketogenic diet, you’ll flush water and sodium out of your body in the first few weeks. As your sodium levels fall, so too will potassium levels. This can leave you feeling tired, sluggish, and wondering what you got yourself into. Fear not, it’s only temporary. Here are some suggestions for avoiding key mineral deficiencies when jumping into a ketogenic diet. Sodium One of the biggest health and nutrition “myths” is that you should avoid salt. If you’re fit, healthy, and following a keto diet you’ll lose water and sodium in the first few weeks. For athletes, this problem can be compounded because you also lose sodium through your sweat, and as your sweat rate increases, your sodium and blood volume will decline. Not a good recipe for optimal energy and performance. On the flip side, if you’re overweight, out of shape or in poor health then your body is likely already holding on to too much sodium from high consumption of packaged and processed foods (i.e. sodium is used as the primary preservative) or from chronically elevated insulin levels. Therefore, a low-carb or keto approach is great way to restore healthy levels. Symptoms of low sodium include fatigue, headaches, compromised ability to perform (especially outdoors in the heat) and in more serious cases you may pass out. Remember that most of the sodium in your body is found in your bloodstream, so if your body gets deficient, you don’t have many reserves to tap into. In t Continue reading >>

How To Cure Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like A Baby Tonight

How To Cure Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like A Baby Tonight

How to CURE Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like a Baby TONIGHT How to CURE Your Keto Insomnia & Sleep Like a Baby TONIGHT Ugh, keto insomnia is by far the most stressful side-effect that I have experienced since I started the ketogenic diet. Hint: it wasn't only keto's fault, there were other factors included, which you are probably guilty of if you are reading right now instead of sleeping. And if you really fall asleep, you have very light sleep and you wake up several times during the night? We can survive a couple of days of problematic sleep, but after that, it just becomes unbearable. You roll around the bed like a crazy person and start analyzing your whole life, while somewhere in the background you can hear classical German yodelling. When you wake up in the morning, you feel like you have partied the whole weekend and after that, you got hit by a firetruck, twice. And this loop continues and gets worse day after day. My first conclusion was that this is probably keto's fault right? Before we dive deep into how and why keto affects your sleep, let's go over the basics. Insomnia is a sleep disorder where individuals find it difficult to fall asleep, waking up frequently during the night or waking up too early due to a number of factors. It's typically followed by daytime sleepiness, low energy, irritability, and depressed mood. [1] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found that one for every three adults gets enough sleep regularly. That means more than third of Americans are sleep deprived on a regular basis. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society have recommended for optimal health and well-being, adults should get at least 7 hours of sleep every night. [2] Sleeping less than 7 hours is associated with increased Continue reading >>

Video: Insomnia On Keto

Video: Insomnia On Keto

Insomnia is the worst. And, when you’ve gone keto and start to feel better overall but your sleep quality starts to suck, it’s an even worse place to be in. You feel great on low-carb keto, but when you eat low-carb keto, your sleep suffers. Perhaps you know that eating carbohydrates fixes your sleep quality problem. Maybe when you ‘fall off the wagon’ and eat all of the carbohydrates, you have the best sleep that night but wake up feeling less than awesome because carbohydrates don’t feel good in your body. Girl, I’ve been there. And it SUCKED. No amount of extra magnesium, or melatonin sprays, liquids or capsules fixed the problem. If you’re experiencing insonia on low-carb/keto diet and you’re looking for solutions that allow you to feel good on your ketogenic diet while also getting the best sleep of your life, you need to watch today’s keto video. For video transcript PDF, scroll down. Your Mini Guide & Transcript A 5-10 page PDF with the transcript for this keto video, resources, and exclusive steps to taking your keto fat burning to the next level. Download to your device and access anytime. Simply click the button above, enter your details, and the guide will be delivered to your inbox! Get the keto mini guide & transcript now. Highlights… Signs that keto is affecting sleep Steps to end insomnia on keto The ultimate reason why you’re experiencing insomnia on keto Resources… Supplement: magnesium glycinate Does your sleep suck since going low-carb, keto? Which of the steps that I shared are you going to try first? My team and I work on finding the best products that not only have quality ingredients, but care about their customers. It has taken us years to find products with ingredients and integrity that I can stand behind. These brands w Continue reading >>

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

7 Things Everyone Should Know About Low-carb Diets

Last week, my staff nutritionist Laura Schoenfeld wrote a guest post for my blog called “Is a Low-Carb Diet Ruining Your Health”. Perhaps not surprisingly, it has caused quite a stir. For reasons I don’t fully understand, some people identify so strongly with how many carbohydrates they eat that they take offense when a suggestion is made that low-carb diets may not be appropriate for everyone, in all circumstances. In these circles low-carb diets have become dogma (i.e. a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true). Followers of this strange religious sect insist that everyone should be on low-carb or even ketogenic diets; that all carbohydrates, regardless of their source, are “toxic”; that most traditional hunter-gatherer (e.g. Paleolithic) societies followed a low-carb diet; and, similarly, that nutritional ketosis—which is only achievable with a very high-fat, low-carb, and low-protein diet—is our default and optimal physiological state. Cut through the confusion and hype and learn what research can tell us about low-carb diets. On the other hand, I’ve also observed somewhat of a backlash against low-carb diets occurring in the blogosphere of late. While I agree with many of the potential issues that have been raised about low-carb diets, and think it’s important to discuss them, I also feel it’s important not to lose sight of the fact that low-carb diets can be very effective therapeutic tools for certain conditions and in certain situations. With this in mind, here are 7 things I think everyone should know about low-carb diets. #1: Paleo does not equal low-carb, and very low-carb/ketogenic diets are not our “default” nutritional state, as some have claimed. Some low-carb advocates have claimed that mo Continue reading >>

How To Diet Hack Your Sleep

How To Diet Hack Your Sleep

If you’re living in a state of high performance; i.e if you’re studying, working or a full time parent, you probably already are; then sleep should be a conscience act, not something that just happens. You have the power to do specific things to make sure you’re tired when you decide to sleep. This includes eating the right foods at the right times, taking supplements and taking or not taking drugs and minimising technology that upsets your body melatonin production. THREE WAYS TO DIET HACK YOUR SLEEP! 1) FILL UP ON FAT! After reading David Asprey’s The Bullet Proof Diet and testing out the effects of MCT oil (medium chain triglycerides) on my own body and brain, I am now using a version of MCT (from food or oils) throughout the entire day. I’ve not only noticed an improvement in my sleep quality but my overall energy and brain ‘clearness’ through the day. ‘Fat is a long burning fuel for your mind and body’ – David Asprey. The shortest length fats of MCT oil are converted into ketones that are immediately used as fuel for your brain, and MCT oil can also help burn body fat while you sleep. I’ve noticed that I think faster and more clearly the next morning if I’ve had either MCT (or XCT or Brain Octane Oil, all MCT variations) the night before. I also find having a slow release complex carbohydrate such as oats before bed (see hack 3 below) also helps me sleep. This is because as you’re giving your body some glucose while you sleep as opposed to ketones from MCT. Both work great and I recommend experimenting with both and see what works best for you. Note: if you’re not used to MCT oil, start slowly and be sure to mix it with something (I normally use whey or vegan rice protein). Too much MCT without your body being used to it can give you a s Continue reading >>

The Keto Craze And Your Sleep

The Keto Craze And Your Sleep

Youve tried all the popular diets: Weight Watchers, Nutrisystem, shake replacements. The options are endless, but it doesnt mean you have found the right fit for your body. With a little homework, a ketogenic diet could be the key to a healthier you with the added bonus of a full nights sleep. Studies from National Institutes of Health show ketogenic diets can drastically lower blood sugar and improve insulin resistance, helping to improve diabetes and prediabetes. It can also improve heart disease including the lowering of blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar. And keto is being usedand increasingly studiedas a dietary therapy for epilepsy , cancer , and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons. With all the health benefits, what exactly is keto? Today we are going to share the terminology, provide food options to get you started, and discover how it helps you sleep better. According to Diet Doctor, the ketogenic diet comes from the fact that it allows the body to produce small fuel molecules called ketones. This is an alternative fuel source for the body, used when blood sugar (glucose) is in short supply. How does it break down you are asking? The normal keto diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent protein , and 5 percent carbohydrates. A modified, high-protein version of keto adjusts the fat-protein ratio: 60 percent fat, 35 percent protein, and 5 percent carbs. Ketones are produced if you eat very few carbs (that are quickly broken down into blood sugar) and only moderate amounts of protein (excess protein can also be converted to blood sugar). The liver produces ketones from fat. These ketones then serve as a fuel source throughout the body, especially for the brain. Your entire body switches its fuel supply to run mostly on fat, bu Continue reading >>

Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling And Overtraining

Why Your Ketogenic Diet Isn’t Working Part One: Underfueling And Overtraining

“My training, racing, and health were all great… until I crashed.” For athletes, it’s not uncommon for the transition to a ketogenic diet from a standard high-carbohydrate diet to look something like this: Take all the carbs out of your diet, cold-turkey - feel awful… Build the metabolic machinery to burn fat more efficiently - feel great! Suddenly, out of nowhere - crash. Like a rollercoaster, you went from feeling terrible to feeling on top of the world, and then back to feeling terrible. The question is “why the crash??” You think: maybe I just need to do a few more fasted training sessions each week. Or, maybe I need to drop my carbs from 30 grams per day to 20 grams per day (broccoli just has too many carbs)... Nope. You might just need to train less and eat more. Still here? Good. This is part one of a series of articles examining potential reasons why a ketogenic diet may fail to produce the expected benefits. Regardless of whether things are just now starting to go downhill, or you never saw results in the first place, the most important step is recognizing that something isn’t right. Getting into nutritional ketosis is one thing, but just because you’re registering 2.0mmol/L on the blood ketone meter doesn’t mean the diet is working for you. Ultimately, performance and health are the goals, and they may or may not coincide with high blood ketones. There are many aspects of life as an endurance athlete that must be accounted for in the equation of optimal health and performance. The most important one that we regularly see is people struggling on a ketogenic diet because they’re underfueling and overtraining. So that’s where we’ll begin! Ultimately, performance and health are the goals, and they may or may not coincide with high blood k Continue reading >>

Sleep Nutrition

Sleep Nutrition

Carbohydrates and Sleep Growth hormone and insulin have antagonistic effects: Elevated growth hormone levels will reduce insulin’s effectiveness, and high insulin levels will suppress the secretion of growth hormone. Therefore, repeatedly eating carbohydrate-rich food immediately before going to sleep may impair growth hormone secretion during your deep-sleep phase. Additionally, your body is more resistant to the effects of insulin at night, meaning that you must produce more insulin to move a given amount of glucose to your body tissues. This may lead to even further suppression of growth hormone secretion. Growth hormone secretion is an important part of the process of SWS, therefore going to bed with elevated or rising insulin will reduce the effectiveness of SWS that night. It is important to go to bed with low blood sugar so that you can maximize your growth hormone secretion potential and Slow Wave Sleep quality. Originally, there was a number of papers showing insulin increasing deep sleep, for example here and here. The obvious statement, then, is that if carbohydrates increase insulin then naturally carbohydrates increase deep sleep. This is a prime example of an ‘affirming the consequent propositional fallacy’. While healthy metabolism will raise insulin in response to an increase in carbohydrates, a healthy metabolism will not raise carbohydrates in response to an increase in insulin (glucagon does that). It therefore stands that carbohydrates do not necessarily increase deep sleep, and in fact insulin will lower blood-glucose causing hypoglycaemia when increased alone… A simple increase in ketosis, or food restriction replicates this increase in SWS without decreasing Growth Hormone secretion. In fact both low carb, ketosis and food restriction incr Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Eating A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Benefits Of Eating A Ketogenic Diet?

The Ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high fat, moderate protein diet. When you understand the role of fat in a healthy metabolism, you can understand why the Ketogenic diet offers so many benefits when it’s done right. Fats are used in everything, and I mean every single metabolic process. Every cell in your body is a little bubble of fat – phospholipid membrane. Even the muscle cells, the blood cells, the bone cells, but especially skin cells and nerve cells. Every single cell! So with that said, let’s have a little rundown of the top ten benefits of the Ketogenic diet: Higher Energy Levels – from Dawn Til’ Dusk Most people notice an increase in their energy levels after about 1 week of eating keto. Sometimes it can take a little longer and other times it only takes a days or two. But believe me, when it happens, it’s very noticeable. No more the sugar highs and slumping lows of the afternoon. You can expect a steady stream of energy all throughout the day. On top of this you can expect greater concentration levels, less brain fog (even if you didn’t know you had it), deeper and more satisfying sleep and waking up feeling refreshed and raring to go. Hugely Improved Sleep Quality I mentioned this briefly in the last point because these two are related, and here’s why. The ketogenic diet helps to regulate your hormones. Did I mention that some of the most hormones are manufactured from fats? Yes, that’s right. They’re called Eicosanoids, and you can see from their Wiki entry that they are involved in just about everything. It was from studying them that we found out about Essential Fatty Acids – they’re essential because you need them to make Eicosanoids! Because these local hormones affect the creation of other hormones they help to regulate everyth Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Effects On Neurobehavioral Development Of Children With Intractable Epilepsy: A Prospective Study

Ketogenic Diet Effects On Neurobehavioral Development Of Children With Intractable Epilepsy: A Prospective Study

Highlights Abstract This study aimed to determine the impact of a ketogenic diet (KD) on neurobehavioral development when used to treat children with intractable epilepsy, confirming the efficacy of the KD, as well as the correlation between early electroencephalography (EEG) changes in the early stage with treatment efficacy. We enrolled 42 children who were starting treatment for intractable epilepsy with the classic KD protocol. The total development quotient as well as the development quotients for adaptability, gross motor movements, fine motor movements, language, and individual–social interaction on the Gesell developmental scales were assessed before and after 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of KD treatment. The efficacy assessment was based on changes in seizure frequency after KD as recorded by the parents. We conducted 24-h video-EEG before and after 1 month of KD treatment. Developmental quotients of five energy regions in the Gesell developmental scales assessment were used to compare adaptability (P1 = 0.000), gross motor movements (P2 = 0.010), and fine motor movements (P3 = 0.000); the results showed significant differences. After KD treatment at different time points, 69.0%, 54.8%, 40.5%, and 33.3% patients, respectively, achieved a ≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency. The reduction of epileptiform discharges in the awake state after 1 month of KD treatment correlated with the efficacy after 3 months of KD treatment. Ketogenic diet treatment tends to be associated with improved neurobehavioral development, and more significant improvement can be obtained with prolonged treatment. The KD is safe and effective in treating children with intractable epilepsy. Early EEG changes correlate with clinical efficacy, to a certain degree. Fig. 1. Exit KD during the tr Continue reading >>

Keto Sleep: Common Issues & How To Fix Them

Keto Sleep: Common Issues & How To Fix Them

Keto Sleep: Common Issues & How to Fix Them From staying within your daily carb limit , to eating enough high-quality fat foods , to keeping your electrolytes up , there are many important elements of being successful on the ketogenic diet. One of the cornerstones of keto is sleep. But many people starting the diet can experience sleep issues including insomnia. In this article well go over the importance of sleep on keto and solutions to common keto sleep issues. Your Sleep Problems May Not Be a Side Effect of Keto How Poor Sleep Can Sabotage Your Ketogenic Diet Keto is more than a weight loss diet. When your body is in a state of ketosis , there are a a wide range of benefits that you could experience, including: Its clear why this lifestyle has amassed an impressive following, from athletes like Tim Tebow to celebrities like Halle Berry to hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of high-achievers. Unfortunately, inadequate sleep can negate many of the benefits provided by following a low-carb, high-fat diet. Inadequate or low-quality sleep can cause: No matter what your reason for being on keto, theres no doubt that sleep is essential for achieving your goals. Committed to becoming a fat-burning athlete? Sleep is crucial for adequate recovery, performance, and muscle building. Love the mental clarity keto gives you? Youre not going to experience any of that when youre a sleep-deprived zombie. Trying to lose weight with keto ? Inadequate sleep makes you crave fast energy from carbs, raises stress and lowers your willpower (especially around food), and causes insulin resistance. Yes, keto has some amazing benefits. But adhering to a strict keto diet while neglecting sleep is like stepping over dollars to pick up pennies. Want to see success on keto? Start viewing slee Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Sleep Quality

Ketosis And Sleep Quality

Sleep Warrior has an interesting article on ketosis and sleep: Ultimately, I think there’s something about the insulin roller coasters we put ourselves on by constantly consuming sugary or starchy foods — and it seems to be impairing how our brains function. The idea is that by fueling our brain cells with an “alternative” source of energy (ketones) we allow them to operate more efficiently, perhaps despite any damage done from too much glucose and insulin. Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

What mistakes are you making when it comes to your health? I know I’ve been making plenty. That’s why I’m tracking my data in this recent ketosis experiment that I’m doing. What about you? Most people think that the ketogenic diet is just “low-carb” which leads them to make many mistakes that prevent them from not reaping all of the benefits of ketosis that they could. What benefits? How about an improved immune system, increased longevity, lower inflammation, effortless weight loss, decreased hunger, reduced risk for disease and more. Read on to know the top 10 ways that people make mistakes with ketosis and how you can prevent them. 1: Not tracking protein intake By far the biggest problem with a ketogenic diet is not tracking how much protein you are eating. The far majority of people are simply eating too much lean protein, which ends up kicking them out of ketosis. Protein can turn into carbs by a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis, meaning “making new carbs.” This then spikes insulin, and reduces ketone levels. Even though you are eating super low carb, this could make your body switch back and forth between energy systems, which will lead to high levels of fatigue or “low carb flu.” The easiest way to avoid this mistake is by tracking your ketone levels to see how you respond to different amounts and different types of meat. Everyone is different, so the only way you can tell is by tracking. I “listened to my body” before and it didn’t work. I wasn’t in ketosis when I thought I was. I also thought ketosis kind of sucked. It didn’t, I was just wrong. The only way you know is by tracking. If you consume more fat with protein, it will slow this effect. So think fattier cuts of meat, and less muscle meat. But wait, are you going to Continue reading >>

A2 Zzz 25.4 | December 2016

A2 Zzz 25.4 | December 2016

Regina Patrick, RST, RPSGT, has been in the sleep field for more than 20 years and works as a sleep technologist at the Wolverine Sleep Disorders Center in Tecumseh, Mich. REGINA PATRICK, RST, RPSGT THE IMPACT OF DIET ON SLEEP QUALITY By Regina Patrick, RPSGT, RST Sleep quality can impact a person’s food choices; for example, sleep-deprived people tend to snack more and eat energy-dense foods.1,2 To a lesser extent, researchers have examined the impact of diet on sleep quality. However, recent research suggests that the impact of diet on sleep may need to be considered as part of a treatment plan for patients with sleep disorders.3 In people with eating disorders, scientists have long noted impaired sleep during the active disease phase and improved sleep as weight was restored.4 Which dietary constituent — carbohy- drates, fat, fiber, protein, etc. — most contributes to the change in sleep patterns has been a more recent research focus. For example, Phillips and colleagues5 used electroencephalography to study sleep changes in men who ingested a normal balanced diet, a high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet, or a low-carbohydrate/high-fat isocaloric diet. (In an isocaloric diet, protein, carbohydrate, and fat each contribute the same percentage of calories.) They found that the men had significantly less slow-wave sleep (SWS) after consuming the high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet than after consuming the normal balanced diet or the low-carbohydrate/ high-fat diet. The amount of SWS in the latter two diets was similar. Men consuming the high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet or the low-carbohydrate/high-fat isocaloric diet, but especially the former group, had significantly more rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, compared to men consuming the normal balanced diet. Because Continue reading >>

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