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Ketosis Severe Diarrhea

Of The Keto Diet?

Of The Keto Diet?

There are many awesome benefits that come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings and even possibly reduce disease risks. With that being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side-effects when ingesting these specific ketone supplements, so you know fully what to expect when you get started on this mission. If you’ve already heard about some of the side-effects that come with this special diet and are starting to freak out, don’t panic. We’re going to break down everything you need to know when it comes to what your body will experience when using these supplements for the first time. It’s important to remember, not everyone experiences side-effects when starting a ketogenic diet and thankfully, the symptoms are all very temporary and it can pass very quickly. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to break down each possible side effect that you could possibly experience. 1. Flu Symptoms Within the first 2-4 days of beginning this diet, a common side-effect is known as the “ketosis flu” or “induction flu” because it mimics the symptoms of the actual flu. This means you might experience: Headaches Lethargy Lack of motivation Brain fog or confusion Irritability​ Although these symptoms typically go away completely within a few days, they are also completely avoidable if you stay very hydrated and increase your salt intake and like always, be sure you're eating enough fat. 2. Dizzyness & Drowsiness​ As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you tired, lightheaded or dizzy. You may also experience muscle cramps, headaches and skin itchiness. Fatigue Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low Carb Diet Side Effects

Low carb diet side effects are manageable if you understand why they happen and how to minimize them. Understanding your physical reactions will help you avoid the worst of the symptoms, and keep you from quitting before you get out of the chute, so to speak. After several weeks, these side effects will subside as you become "keto-adapted" and able to burn fat instead of glucose for fuel. The list below includes the most common low carb diet side effects, and I've included tips on how to handle them. The only caveat is that you have no contraindicated health conditions. I have detailed here who should NOT follow a ketogenic diet. Frequent Urination After the first day or so, you'll notice that you are in the bathroom urinating more often. Your body is burning up the extra glycogen (stored glucose) in your liver and muscles. Breaking down glycogen releases a lot of water. As your carb intake and glycogen stores drop, your kidneys will start dumping this excess water. In addition, as your circulating insulin levels drop, your kidneys start excreting excess sodium, which will also cause more frequent urination. (see this reference). Fatigue and Dizziness As you start dumping water, you'll lose minerals such as salt, potassium and magnesium as well. Having lower levels of these minerals will make you very, very tired, lightheaded or dizzy, give you muscle cramps, and headaches. You may also experience skin itchiness. Fatigue and dizziness are the most common of the low carb diet side effects, and they can be avoided for the most part by making sure you stay ahead of mineral loss. You can counteract mineral losses by eating more salt or sipping salty broth throughout the day, and eating potassium rich foods. (Dairy foods, green leafy vegetables and avocados are high in potas Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

Have you just started a low-carb diet? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted and overcome by tiredness? Perhaps you are thinking that going low-carb wasn’t a good idea after all… You might already know that these symptoms are not uncommon, especially if you are doing low-carb for the first time. Also known as “low carb flu” or “Atkins flu”, this phase is completely normal – although by no means pleasant. This condition occurs when you cut your carb intake sharply, to about 20-30g a day, in order to induce ketosis. What is low-carb flu? Your body is used to running on carbs. It’s been operating this way for decades. Cutting carbs in favour of fat is a huge change for your metabolism. Your body needs some time to adjust to this change. This period of adjustment can sometimes cause flu-like symptoms. Fatigue is the most common one, but you could also get muscle cramps, headaches, dizziness and mental fog. Some of these symptoms are markers of sugar withdrawal. Sugar addiction is real and common, so trying to break away can be difficult. Low-carb flu is not actual flu Please note that “low carb flu” does not include fever or respiratory cold-like symptoms such as coughing or sneezing. If you are experiencing any of these, it means that you might have actually caught an infection! So it would be a good idea to postpone starting your diet until you are all clear. How can you fight tiredness and other symptoms of low-carb flu? First of all, remember that it won’t last forever. Low-carb flu usually lasts around 3-5 days (although could be 1-2 weeks for some unlucky people with high metabolic resistance). Here are some simple tips on making this transition easier. 1) Eat more fat Fat is the key to this whole issue. You must eat lots of it – a lot more th Continue reading >>

Use Of Parenteral Medium-chain Triglyceride Emulsion For Maintaining Seizure Control In A 5-year-old Girl With Intractable Diarrhea.

Use Of Parenteral Medium-chain Triglyceride Emulsion For Maintaining Seizure Control In A 5-year-old Girl With Intractable Diarrhea.

Abstract Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) are an important component of an enteral ketogenic diet for seizure control. Previously, it was difficult to maintain ketosis when parenteral (iv) nutrition therapy was necessary. The use of iv MCT in a 5-year-old girl with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome who had diarrhea and dehydration is reported. Conventional 20% iv fat emulsion (long-chain triglycerides, LCT) and dextrose free hyperalimentation (HAL) in a 4:1 ketogenic ratio did not maintain adequate ketosis during bowel rest. Compassionate use of iv MCT (Clintec Nutrition) infused as a 70:30 MCT/LCT ratio plus HAL maintained moderate ketosis. Seizures were well controlled during the iv MCT regimen, which allowed normal daily functioning. Complications included abnormal liver function tests and severe iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology. Serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels increased to 1717 mg/dl and 614 mg/dl, respectively, but decreased with a reduction of lipid infusion and use of an antihyperlipemic drug. Nutritional status was maintained. In this case, iv MCT proved to be a relatively safe and effective short-term method of continuing parenteral nutrition while maintaining ketosis for seizure control. Continue reading >>

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects

The 11 Most Common Keto Side Effects The ketogenic diet is a powerful new tool to hit the mainstream recently. This style of eating has substantial data behind it showing that it can boost fat-burning, reduce inflammation, boost cognitive performance, and more. What has not been covered quite enough are common keto side effects and how you can avoid them to make the best of this powerful eating style. Although there can be many different side effects that manifest while becoming keto-adapted, many of them stem from similar underlying issues. In this article, I outline what those underlying issues are, their related side effects, and simple strategies to overcome them so you can become keto-adapted as smoothly as possible. Three Primary Causes Although there are a variety of symptoms that can arise during keto adaptation, they mostly manifest from the same three underlying causes. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis dysfunction, and electrolyte/mineral deficiencies. While these three causes are seemingly different, they are actually all related. When becoming keto-adapted initially, your body has been running on sugar for years. When you suddenly switch to fats, your body has to essentially build the cellular machinery necessary to generate and utilize ketone bodies as a fuel source. This means that instead of generating tons of ketones from the very beginning, most people experience hypoglycemia for a period of time. With hypoglycemia comes a disruption in cortisol signaling which is what accounts for the HPA axis dysfunction. Finally, HPA axis dysfunction leads to an increase in secretion of minerals from the body in the urine. Together these three causes can create all kinds of side effects. Once you understand them, though, a lit Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet For Fat Loss & Much More

The Ketogenic Diet For Fat Loss & Much More

In this article you will learn: What Ketosis is and how it relates to fat metabolism. How to structure your diet in such a way as to create a healthy state of ketosis for fat loss, massively improved energy levels and many other health benefits. To put it simply, ketosis is the metabolic state wherein your body is burning predominantly fat to produce energy. Ketones are the energy substrate your body makes from fats you eat and from your own bodyfat. Getting into ketosis (fat burning mode) is a highly sought after state for anyone who desires to lose bodyfat. There are a few things that can get in the way of being in fat burning mode and we will review them in this post. For a more elaborate definition of ketosis, here is an excerpt from wikipedia: Note: when glucose is available for energy then the body will generally not produce ketones (i.e. will not burn fat). Glucose can come from eating foods that contain carbohydrates and it can also come from protein through a process mentioned above called gluconeogenesis (the production of glucose from protein.) That means that if you are eating carbohydrates often or too much protein, it can keep you out of fat burning mode. Before you jump into trying to follow a ketogenic diet you have to first determine if your body will be able to run primarily on fats for energy. The ketogenic diet is very high in fat, which means you need to be able to digest fat very effectively if you are going to thrive on this diet. Effective digestion of all the fat you eat on a ketogenic diet require your liver and gall bladder to be working well - i.e. producing and effectively secreting sufficient amounts of bile. Bile is an alkaline liquid soap/salt that your liver makes and your gall bladder stores and concentrates. When you eat any meal, the Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Cure Candida? The Ketosis-candida-mercury Link

Does The Ketogenic Diet Cure Candida? The Ketosis-candida-mercury Link

You’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for a while now and you’ve been promised weight loss, more energy, clearer head, better sleep or possibly even ascension? But instead you got some or all of the following? weight gain stiff neck fatigue brain fog heart palpitations head pressure burning sensation in the mouth insatiable thirst impaired breathing / coughing / shortness of breath headaches nausea stiff joints muscle stiffness depression insomnia rash bloated, painful intestines constipation or diarrhea white coated tongue phlegm or mucus or the feeling of having a “frog” in your throat just overall feeling more miserable But you aren’t willing to give up on the diet just yet because you were told all those negative symptoms you’ve started to experience were due to your body adjusting from a sugar to a fat burning metabolism? Or that your mtDNA was being repaired? That you just need to stick through it, or drink more water or take a few supplements? That in order to get well you have to get sick first? That the insomnia really is you having more energy and hence needing less sleep? And yet it’s been weeks, months, or more than a year but you still experience those symptoms and you’re not really feeling well and – surprisingly – you have actually GAINED some weight?! If so, then it might be time to consider that the Ketogenic Diet is actually making you sick. WHAAAAAT??!! How could that be? You ask. And: Who am I to suggest such blasphemy? I’m a former Keto Fanatic, someone who had been on the Ketogenic Diet for over 1 year until I realized that ketosis was wrecking havoc with my body, and now I’m here to tell you all about it. How did I get into the Ketogenic Diet? Did I go from eating pizza and drinking Cola straight to eating 4 eggs for breakfast Continue reading >>

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

As the ketogenic diet gains popularity, it’s important to have a balanced discussion regarding the merits of this diet. Let me emphasize right out of the gate that this is not a diet without merits (excuse the double negative); in fact, it has significant therapeutic potential for some clinical pathologies. However, it is also a diet with inherent risk, as evidenced by the extensive list of adverse reactions reported in the scientific literature—and this has not yet been a thorough enough part of the public discussion on ketogenic diets. The AIP Lecture Series is a 6-week video-based, self-directed online course that will teach you the scientific foundation for the diet and lifestyle tenets of the Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first of a series of articles discussing various facets of a ketogenic diet with an inclination toward balancing the discussion of the pros and cons of this high-fat, low-carb, low/moderate-protein diet. My interest in this topic stems from concerns I have over its general applicability and safety, simultaneous with its growing popularity. I feel a moral and social obligation to share what I understand of these diets, from my perspective as a medical researcher. The dangers of a ketogenic diet was, in fact, the topic of my keynote presentation at Paleo F(x) this year (links to video will be provided once available). This series of articles will share the extensive research that I did in preparation for this presentation, including all of the topics covered during my talk as well as several topics that I didn’t have time to discuss (also see the free PDF Literature Review at the bottom of this post). For every anecdotal story of someone who has regained their health with a ketogenic diet, there’s a counterpoint story of someone who derai Continue reading >>

Metabolism And Ketosis

Metabolism And Ketosis

Dr. Eades, If the body tends to resort to gluconeogenesis for glucose during a short-term carbohydrate deficit, are those who inconsistently reduce carb intake only messing things up by not effecting full blown ketosis? If the body will still prefer glucose as main energy source unless forced otherwise for at least a few days, is it absolutely necessary to completely transform metabolism for minimal muscle loss? Also, if alcohol is broken down into ketones and acetaldehyde, technically couldn’t you continue to drink during your diet or would the resulting gluconeogenesis inhibition from alcohol lead to blood glucose problems on top of the ketotic metabolism? Would your liver ever just be overwhelmed by all that action? I’m still in high school so hypothetical, of course haha… Sorry, lots of questions but I’m always so curious. Thank you so much for taking the time to inform the public. You’re my hero! P.S. Random question…what’s the difference between beta and gamma hydroxybutyric acids? It’s crazy how simple orientation can be the difference between a ketone and date rape drug…biochem is so cool! P.P.S. You should definitely post the details of that inner mitochondrial membrane transport. I’m curious how much energy expenditure we’re talkin there.. Keep doin your thing! Your Fan, Trey No, I don’t think people are messing up if they don’t get into full-blown ketosis. For short term low-carb dieting, the body turns to glycogen. Gluconeogenesis kicks in fairly quickly, though, and uses dietary protein – assuming there is plenty – before turning to muscle tissue for glucose substrate. And you have the Cori cycle kicking in and all sorts of things to spare muscle, so I wouldn’t worry about it. And you can continue to drink while low-carbing. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet : The Best Way Ever To Get Ripped!

Ketogenic Diet : The Best Way Ever To Get Ripped!

The Ketogenic diet pretty much goes against everything you've been told about dieting I'm extremely surprised by the results and how amazing I feel... I dropped 12 pounds in 6 weeks and lost about 3% body-fat (21% to 18%) and gained strength at the gym. All the bloating I used to have when clean eating went away, I have more energy and my hunger went down so much that I sometimes force myself to reach my 1500 calories per day. So even if it was hard getting into it at first, I though some of you would like to know about it! What is the Ketogenic Diet? Keto is a very low-carbohydrates, high-fat, adequate protein diet. The Ketogenic diet is almost 100 yeard old, it was use as a treatment for the epileptic patients in the 1920 and 1930s: How does the Ketogenic Diet work? When you drastically limit your carbohydrates intake, your body can longer rely on it as its main source of energy, fat will become your new main source of energy which also includes your body fat. When using fat as energy, your body will first break it into Ketones. When your Ketones level is higher than normal (meaning you're burning fat), you are in a state of Ketosis. 1. The Ketogenic Diet helps you lose body-fat, bad cholesterol and preservers your lean body mass! If you want to lose fat, this is the best way to do so. The reason for this is that when you're on a normal glycolytic metabolism, fat is considered as a backup fuel by your body and is only used as a last resort. On a "default metabolic state", if your body needs energy it will : First look for glucose in your blood-stream; If no glucose is found it will try to convert the glycogen in your liver into glucose; If no glycogen is found, it will break down MUSCLES and fat (fat being the very last option). Under Ketosis, fat is the first option! Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

There are many symptoms and adverse effects reported by study groups on low carbohydrate diets such as the ketogenic diet. The main ketogenic diet symptoms are: headache, dizziness, presence of diarrhea and constipation, weakness, loss of concentration, bad breath, low blood pressure, increased heart rate, among many others. According to Dr. Mauro DiPasquale, a respected member of the international sports community as an athlete, administrator and physician, and author of the famous book “The Anabolic Diet”, he originally created this diet for bodybuilders and athletes, but since then he has developed other versions for the general public. This is a very interesting article about ketogenic diet from ncbi. about “Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients”. He says that in the first week of the ketogenic diet the body is going through the metabolic shift from being a carb and muscle-burning machine to being a fat burner, and that can be very difficult. This is called the induction phase and people may have some symptoms including lethargy, dizziness, mental fogginess, irritability, and irregular bowels, depending on how your body reacts to the radical shift in macronutrients. Some people will suffer few symptoms, others will be very affected. Your energy can also drop and there might be a frequent feeling of you being hungry. That’s because the body is going through a readjustment phase. Due to the low amount of nutrients, especially vitamins and minerals, may also occur weakening of the immune system, leaving the body more susceptible to several infections. So, the discipline and persistence during the first week of the ketogenic diet is very important to experience the benefits later. The energy will come back and you will feel better. This will Continue reading >>

8 Signs That You Might Have Keto Flu And What To Do About It

8 Signs That You Might Have Keto Flu And What To Do About It

When you start a Ketogenic diet, you are generally putting your body into a state of ketosis. I know it sounds serious, but really it’s not. It’s what happens when your body starts burning carbs instead of fat. Your body is just undergoing metabolic changes. Sometimes this is referred to as “keto flu”. Here are 8 signs of keto flu and what you can do about it. What Is Keto Flu The “keto flu” is a label given to a set of carbohydrate withdrawal symptoms that may occur in people who start a low carb diet that results from altered hormonal states and the electrolyte imbalances that may occur with it. In other words, it describes a cycle in the body adapting to a newly started low carb diet. Keto stands for ketogenic, a very strict low carb eating plan. The term should really be “low carb flu” since the ketogenic diet is not the only low carb plan. 8 Symptoms of Keto Flu No two individuals are alike, so the symptoms can range from nothing to mild to a full-blown flu-like condition, and include • Lightheadedness • Nausea • Fatigue • Mental fog • Cramps • Headaches • Diarrhea • In some extreme cases, high blood pressure and arrhythmia How Long Does Keto Flu Last? The duration for keto flu varies for each person. While some may have slight and even unnoticeable symptoms for a day or two, others might have an over the top symptom for a week or more, it really depends on how quickly your body adapts to a reduction in carbs. Once keto flu is over you can expect a huge surge in energy levels, and once that sugar habit is fully kicked, often people feel better than ever. Being patient as your body adapts is key, and know that it will pass, and if it does not you should seek the attention of a qualified medical professional. For most people any sympto Continue reading >>

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Resist The Dark Side And Easily Shift Into Ketosis

Four years ago, I realized that I’d been duped. I’d been lied to about carbohydrates. Despite obtaining a graduate degree with advanced courses in human nutrition, biochemistry, microbiology, and exercise physiology, a sports nutritionist certification, and plenty of time with my face stuffed in dietary research journals, I was simply doing things completely back-asswards when it came to fueling my body. See, my physical performance on my “gold-standard” 50-60% carbohydrate intake was just fine. Performance wasn’t an issue. I was quite competitive and very fast in my triathlons, runs, swims, bike rides, and workouts. But I also had bloating. Gas. Fermentation. Wildly fluctuating energy levels. Extra bits of fat around my belly and hips. Inflammation. All the warning signs of high blood glucose. All the signs that I was sacrificing health and longevity for performance…all the issues I talk about in gory detail in my book Beyond Training. So I simply gave a finger to dyed-in-the-wool, orthodox sports nutrition advice that trickles down from companies like Gatorade, Powerbar, and the US Government’s Food Pyramid. I took a deep, deep dive into a more ancestral, natural form of eating. I started eating more greens. More vegetables. More nutrient-dense plants. And I combined those plants with oodles of healthy, natural fats like avocadoes, olive oil, coconut milk, seeds, nuts, fatty fish, grass-fed meats, and yes, even “weird” foods like bone broth, liver, sardines and many of these unorthodox meals and pantry foods. I began eating the “cyclic” low-carbohydrate diet that I outline in my book on low carbohydrate eating for athletes, meaning that I would save the majority of my carbohydrate intake for the very end of the day, and even then, I ate the clean Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

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