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Ketosis May Result From Quizlet

Ch. 16 A&p

Ch. 16 A&p

1. Chemical substances secreted by cells into the extracellular fluids and that regulate the metabolic function of other cells in the body are called ________. 4. Which of the following is not a change that may be caused by hormonal stimulus? a change in membrane potential direct control of the nervous system the stimulation of a genetic event resulting in protein synthesis an increase in enzymatic activity direct control of the nervous system 5. The ability of a specific tissue or organ to respond to the presence of a hormone is dependent on ________. the presence of the appropriate receptors on the cells of the target tissue or organ 6. Thyroid hormone (a small iodinated amine) enters target cells in a manner similar to ________. steroid hormones, because both diffuse easily into target cells 7. What ion is sometimes used as a second messenger of amino acid–based hormones? 8. Both "turn on" factors (hormonal, humoral, and neural stimuli) and "turn off" factors (feedback inhibition and others) may be modulated by the activity of the nervous system. 9. Virtually all of the protein or amino acid-based hormones exert their effects through intracellular ________. 10. Which of the following is not a type of hormone interaction? synergism feedback antagonism permissiveness 11. Which of the following is not a change typically produced by a hormonal stimulus? induces secretory activity stimulates production of an action potential activates or deactivates enzymes alters plasma membrane permeability stimulates production of an action potential 12. The second-messenger mechanism of hormone action operates by ________. binding to specific receptors and employing the services of G proteins and cAMP 13. Cells that respond to peptide hormones usually do so through a sequence of bio Continue reading >>

Rnc Inpatient Obsetrics Exam

Rnc Inpatient Obsetrics Exam

How to study your flashcards. Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards. Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back. H key: Show hint (3rd side). A key: Read text to speech. Share Print Export Clone 217 Cards in this Set Front Back What is the normal contraction frequency in the active phase of labor? q 2 to 3 min Hyperstimulation is defined as Contractions of normal duration occuring within 1 min of each other, a series of single contractions lasting 2 min or more, or a contraction frequency of five or more in 10 min Are coupling or tripling ominous signs? No. It is a common pattern early in labor and does not usually initiate FHR responses. At term, how much cardiac output perfuses the uterus each minute? 10% to 15% or 600 to 750 ml Fetal deoxygenated blood is carried to the placental villi by the two umbilical arteries How does maternal-fetal exchange of oxygen and other nutrients occur? In the intervillous space across the membranes that separate fetal and maternal circulation. Oxygen is exchanged thru passive diffusion (high concentration is maternal side; low concentration is fetal side) and nutrients are exchanged by active transport, facilitated diffusion and pinocytosis. The significant factors affecting placental exchange of gases and nutrients for the fetus are uterine blood flow, umbilical blood flow, and the amount of placental area available for exchange. Why does the FHR slowly drop in normal baseline as the fetus matures? The parasympathetic nervous system matures during the second trimester, and the vegas nerve (which slows the HR) gradually becomes dominant over sympathetic stimulation. Define FHR accelerations An abrupt increase in FHR above baseline. The acme is 15 beats/min above baseline and the acceleration lasts at leas Continue reading >>

3,065 Possible Causes For Alkalosis + Hyperkalemia + Ketosis + Flattened T Wave In Usa

3,065 Possible Causes For Alkalosis + Hyperkalemia + Ketosis + Flattened T Wave In Usa

Hypokalemia Flattened T Wave Alkalosis […] overdose Beta 2 sympathomimetics Decongestants Xanthines Amphotericin B Verapamil intoxication Chloroquine (Aralen) intoxication Barium intoxication Cesium intoxication Alkalosis[aafp.org] EKG changes show a flattened T wave with an eventual emergence of a prominent U wave.[prezi.com] “Via a variety of physiologic mechanisms many of the treatments used for ketosis actually serve to exacerbate hypokalemia whilst treating the ketosis.[bovinevetonline.com] Hyperkalemia refers to a high level of potassium in the blood serum.[en.wikipedia.org] Hyperkalemia Acne Vulgaris Agitated Delirium Arterial Blood pH Increased Aseptic Necrosis of Head of Femur Asthenia Atrophy of the Thigh Muscles Back Pain Bartter's Disease Behavior Problem Complete Blood Count Abnormal Cutaneous Candidiasis Decreased Taste Sensation Diastolic Hypertension Edema Emotional Lability Emotional Outbursts Eosinophils Decreased Erythrocytes Increased Facial Edema Facial Swelling Glaucoma Glucose Increased Growth Retardation Head and Neck Swelling Hematocrit Increased Hemoglobin Increased Hirsutism Hyperuricemia Hypokalemic Nephropathy Hypomagnesemia Hyponatremia Hyposmia Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Increased Abdominal Girth Increased Body Hair Infertility Irritability Leukocyte Alkaline Phosphatase Increased Leukocytosis Male Sterility Metabolic Encephalopathy Metyrapone Challenge Test Abnormal Muscular Atrophy Nephrolithiasis Neutrophil Count Increased Osteoporosis Peptic Ulcer Periorbital Fullness Phosphate Decreased Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Potassium Decreased Progesterone Increased Psychiatric Manifestation Psychosis Recurrent Infection Relative Impotence Short PR Interval Skin Infection Supraclavicular Fat Pads Systolic Hypertension Thin Extremiti Continue reading >>

Like This Study Set?

Like This Study Set?

Sort b,c,d In the body as dissociated electrolytes Held in significant amounts in reserve in the body Include sodium, potassium, and chloride Minerals are: Continue reading >>

Ch. 4 Carbohydrates

Ch. 4 Carbohydrates

Sort complex carbohydrates Complex Polysaccharides Made up of amylose and amylopectin Glycogen Branched chain of glucose Store in liver and muscle Amylose= straight linkages of CHO units, amylopectin- branched structure, gives CHO differing properties i.e. potatoes Starch= amylose (fluffy strachy potato) + amylopectin (waxy i.e. little red potato) Fiber= roughage, contains resistance starches, do not break down i.e. legumes, whole grains, fruit and veggies Glycogen= storage of glucose/energy in liver and muscles, providing energy when not consuming energy glucose Can be made into energy by our cells Can be stored as glycogen for later use in the Muscle (150 grams, 600 kcal) Liver (90 grams, 360 kcal) Physical training can increase storage capacity Converts glucose to energy through glycolysis, and Krebs Glycogen= storage form of glucose (energy) through glycogenesis can be quickly broken down for energy metabolism Blood glucose source of energy to all cells Metabolism primarily maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis at 70 to 100 mg/dL Conversion to and from glucose Glycogenolysis - liver/muscle glycogen → glucose Gluconeogenesis - fat/protein → glucose Pyruvic, lactic acid (intermediates of muscle glycogenolysis converted to BG) Amino acids can provide some but not all glucose needs, AA can be converted to glucose if needed insufficient carb intake Fat is metabolized → ketones Overtime ketosis occurs Affects pH balance of the body Minimum 100 grams carbohdrate/day to prevent ketosis Ketones are by-product of fat breakdown for energy If insufficient CHO intake, build up ketones and ph imbalance can occur--? Ketoacidosis S/S fruity acetone breath blood glucose control Hormonal system controls glucose metabolism and blood glucose level regulation Insulin - anabolic Continue reading >>

Metabolism

Metabolism

Sort Describe factors that affect metabolic rate (production body heat) Exercise increases metabolic rate as much as 15 times Hormones regulate metabolic rate (thyroxine, insulin, growth hormone and testosterone) Higher body temp raised BMR ingestion of food raise BMR 10-20% Childrens BMR is double that of an elderly person sympathetic nervous systems release of epinephrine (adrenaline) & norepinephrine (noradrenaline) increases BMR Continue reading >>

Chapter 4-8 Test Review

Chapter 4-8 Test Review

Sort If a diet does not provide adequate carbohydrate to meet immediate energy needs, the body compensates by altering its metabolism of other nutrients. Insufficient dietary carbohydrate can lead to elevated levels of ketone bodies. Ketone bodies are the byproducts of partial breakdown of: Fat Recommended Dietary Allowances differ for various stages of life and gender. While adult needs for most nutrients are generally greater than those of children, this is not the case for carbohydrate. Because their bodies are developing so quickly, children aged 1-3 have very high carbohydrate needs that equals the same number of grams of carbohydrate an adult should have each day. What is the RDA for carbohydrate for both children aged 1-3 and adults? 130 grams Match the activity of dietary fiber that is related to its health benefit. 1. Fiber increases satiety Helps promote weight loss correct 2. Fiber reduces cholesterol absorption and increases cholesterol excretion Reduces Cardiovascular disease risk correct 3. Soluble fiber slows down digestion and blood glucose spikes Improves diabetes management correct 4. Insoluble fiber increases stool bulk and increases regularity Promotes colon health correct Brandy's seven-year-old daughter was recently diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and research indicates that Brandy should not feed her daughter any refined sugar products because sugar intake causes hyperactivity in children. False Contrary to popular belief, all of the alternative sweeteners approved for sale in the U.S. are safe for human consumption and have never been proven to be carcinogenic (cancer-causing) in humans. Of the following alternative sweeteners, which one is banned for sale in the U.S. because of controversial research that indicated Continue reading >>

Nutrition Mid-term Studies

Nutrition Mid-term Studies

Sort A meal with fat has been eaten. Immediately after, these newly consumed fats are digested and then absorbed. They will then appear in the lymphatic system and then the blood system as part of which transport vehicle? Chylomicrons Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism And Hyperthyroidism Quizlet

Hypothyroidism And Hyperthyroidism Quizlet

4. Imbalanced nutrition: Less than body requirements related to thyroid hormone excess In the client with hyperthyroidism, excessive thyroid hormone production leads. Gastroparesis Treatment Specialist::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days.[ GASTROPARESIS TREATMENT SPECIALIST. Natural Treatment For Diabetic Nerve Damage:: Diabetic Foot Care Korean The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days. Quiz: Could You Have a Thyroid Problem? A simple quiz that helps pinpoint your risks and symptoms. When caring for a client who's being treated for hyperthyroidism, it's important to: A client with a history of hypertension is diagnosed with primary hyperaldosteronism. Quiz: Could You Have a Thyroid Problem? This diagnosis indicates that hypothyroidism client's hypertension is caused by excessive hormone secretion from which quizlet This hormone acts on active renal tubule, where and promotes reabsorption of sodium and excretion of potassium thyroid hydrogen ions. The pancreas under secretes hormones involved in quizlet metabolism. The parathyroids secrete parathyroid hormone. Under client hyperthyroidism Addison's disease is scheduled quizlet discharge after being hospitalized for an adrenal crisis. Which statements by the client would indicate and client teaching has been effective? Fatigue, weakness, and dizziness quizlet symptoms of inadequate dosing of steroid therapy; the physician should be notified if these symptoms occur. A client with Addison's disease doesn't produce enough steroids, so routine administration of steroids is a lifetime treatment. Daily weights should be monitored and monitor changes in active balance, not calorie intake. Influenza and an added physical stressor and the client may requir Continue reading >>

3,947 Possible Causes For Hyperammonemia + Hypoglycemia + Ketosis In Usa

3,947 Possible Causes For Hyperammonemia + Hypoglycemia + Ketosis In Usa

Propionic Acidemia Hypoglycemia Ketosis Hyperammonemia Neonatal clinical onset is characterized by severe metabolic acidemia accompanied by hyperammonemia, hyperglycemia, lethargy, vomiting, hypotonia; and hepatomegaly.[icd10data.com] Serum (during an acute episode) metabolic acidosis with a wide anion gap, dehydration, hypoglycemia secondary hyperammonemia secondary carnitine deficiency serum amino acids[pedbase.org] Elevated accumulation and excretion of glycine accompanied by ketosis that is secondary to methylmalonicacidemia, isovalericacidemia and other organic acidemias, as distinguished[icd10data.com] List represents a sample of symptoms, diseases, and other queries. Updated weekly. Hungry Bones Syndrome Altitude Sickness Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Posterior Subcapsular Cataract Cellulitis Splenic Infarction Megaloblastic Anemia Islet Cell Tumor Chronic Phase of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Penile Fracture Tuberous Sclerosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Odynophagia, unilateral throat pain Costovertebral Angle Tenderness Dyspepsia Tenesmus Oliguria Scrotal Ulcer Choledochal Cyst Anal Fistula Essential Hypertension Enthesitis-Related Arthritis Glioblastoma Multiforme Leiomyosarcoma Brain Neoplasm Hyperventilation Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Ethmoid Sinusitis Dementia with Lewy Bodies Infarction vaginal discharge, weight loss hemoglobin decreased, typhoid fever Fever, Polyserositis Hyponatremia, Ileus Burning Sensation Autoamputation of Digits Bradycardia Reduced Fetal Movement Calcaneal Spur Arteriovenous Malformation Berry Aneurysm Arachnoiditis Lateral Medullary Syndrome Myiasis Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathies Cheilitis Clonus, Hyperreflexia, muscle hypotonia Absent Triceps Reflex Cul De Sac Mass Delayed Bone Age Nystag Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Sort what are the syndromes of ketosis >spontaneous ketosis -inadequate diet -wasting form (most common form) -nervous form -subclinical form >underfeeding ketosis -primary (not enough food) -secondary (not eating enough) what are the signs that result from the hypoglycaemia:neurological form of ketosis -occurs in about 10% of cases -presents as a neurological case (not metabolic) -licking/chewing the bars -depraved appetite -salivation -wandering -hyperaesthesia, staggery gait, mm tremors -agression -appears blind may head press -or may be depressed and dull Continue reading >>

877 Possible Causes For Bicarbonate Increased + Hypokalemia During Periodic Paralysis + Metabolic Alkalosis In Usa

877 Possible Causes For Bicarbonate Increased + Hypokalemia During Periodic Paralysis + Metabolic Alkalosis In Usa

Bartter's Disease Metabolic Alkalosis Bicarbonate Increased Hypochloremic Metabolic Alkalosis hypokalemia during periodic paralysis Hypokalaemia may cause metabolic alkalosis and metabolic alkalosis may cause hypokalaemia. [ 1 , 2 ] Liddle's syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by early[patient.info] , and frequently severe, hypertension associated with hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, low plasma renin activity, and suppressed aldosterone secretion.[patient.info] Hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis may be caused by diarrhoea, vomiting, laxative or diuretic abuse, liquorice ingestion, antacid medication abuse or excess alcohol intake.[patient.info] Addison's Disease Alkaline Phosphatase Increased Alopecia Bilateral Hilar Adenopathy Cardiomyopathy Cervical Lymphadenopathy Choroiditis Complete Blood Count Abnormal Conduction Disorder of the Heart Conjunctival Biopsy Abnormal Conjunctival Nodule Dactylitis Diabetes Insipidus Edema of the Hands and Feet Elevated Sedimentation Rate Enlarged Submandibular Lymph Gland Erythema Nodosum Exertional Dyspnea Facial Nerve Disorder Gammaglobulins Increased Globulins Increased Granulomatous Lung Disease Headache Hepatomegaly Hilar Adenopathy Hyperglobulinemia Hypersplenism Hyperuricemia Hypocapnia Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Immunoglobulin A Increased Immunoglobulin G Increased Immunoglobulin M Increased Interstitial Lung Disease Intrahepatic Cholestasis Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis Left Ventricular Aneurysm Leukoerythroblastic Anemia Limb Pain Loss of Vision Lung Biopsy showing Multinucleated Giant Cells Lymphangiogram Abnormal Massive Splenomegaly Mediastinal Mass Miliary Infiltrate of the Lung Monocyte Count Increased Mononeuritis Multiplex Nephrolithiasis Neutrophil Count Decreased Night Sweats PO2 De Continue reading >>

Human Nutrition Chapter 7 - Metabolism

Human Nutrition Chapter 7 - Metabolism

Sort What is the process of pyruvate to Acetyl CoA? Requires oxygen (aerobic) Utilized if cell needs energy Remove COOH from pyruvate and is released as two CO2 to external environment Enzyme derived from Vitamin B and central to the energy metabolism of nutrients Remaining two carbon compounds attaches to CoA becoming Acetyl CoA which is used as building blocks for fatty acids Not reversible, cannot retrieve CO2 Continue reading >>

Chapter 4: The Carbohydrates

Chapter 4: The Carbohydrates

Sort What do carbohydrates contain? Carbohydrates contain energy that plants captured through photosynthesis Photosynthesis makes use of chlorophyll to capture energy and sunlight In this process, water donates hydrogen and oxygen, and carbon dioxide donates carbon and oxygen Water and carbon dioxide combine to form the sugar glucose What does glucose do? Carbohydrates - Glucose. Glucose is by far the most common carbohydrate and classified as a monosaccharide, an aldose, a hexose, and is a reducing sugar Glucose produced by photosynthesis provides energy for the work of all parts of the plant Plants do not use all the energy stored in their sugars Some remains available for use by the animal or human that consumes the plant Carbohydrates are the first link in the food chain that supports all life on Earth -----Glucose is the most used monosaccharide in the body Purpose of Carbohydrates? Carbohydrates meet your body's energy needs: Feed your brain & nervous system Keep your digestive system fit Within calorie limits, help keep your body lean Together with fats & protein, digestible carbohydrates add bulk to foods Indigestible carbohydrates yield little or no energy but provide other benefits What is the CHO consumption in Canada today? Too Much Simple CHO! • Average CHO intake in Canada is 50% of diet - ½ this amount is simple sugars consumption has increased 33% since 1960) - Most common source is sweetened drinks average consumption=100 L/yr/person • Equals about 15 L of sugar of sugar per year! Is Fructose making us fat? • Accounts for over 40% of sweeteners in our diet • Contributes an avg 132 cal/day/person • Handled differently by the body than Glucose - Does not stimulate insulin production - Effect on other hormone signals that regulate food intake an Continue reading >>

Chapter 4 - Nutrition

Chapter 4 - Nutrition

Sort type 2 is the more common type where cells resist insulin. Cells fail to respond to insulin or the insulin amount is insufficient). This condition tends to occur as a consequence of obesity. The pancreas produces enough insulin but the cell surface receptors have lost much of their ability to recognize the insulin and don't respond. Dietary carbohydrate does not cause diabetes. Many people with this type of diabetes are obese. Obesity is clearly a factor in this type. As the incidence of obesity in the U.S. has risen in recent decades, the incidence of diabetes has followed. An obese person is 3x more likely to develop this disease than a nonobese individual Continue reading >>

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