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Ketosis May Result From

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis: What You Should Know

Despite the similarity in name, ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketoacidosis refers to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and is a complication of type 1 diabetes mellitus. It’s a life-threatening condition resulting from dangerously high levels of ketones and blood sugar. This combination makes your blood too acidic, which can change the normal functioning of internal organs like your liver and kidneys. It’s critical that you get prompt treatment. DKA can occur very quickly. It may develop in less than 24 hours. It mostly occurs in people with type 1 diabetes whose bodies do not produce any insulin. Several things can lead to DKA, including illness, improper diet, or not taking an adequate dose of insulin. DKA can also occur in individuals with type 2 diabetes who have little or no insulin production. Ketosis is the presence of ketones. It’s not harmful. You can be in ketosis if you’re on a low-carbohydrate diet or fasting, or if you’ve consumed too much alcohol. If you have ketosis, you have a higher than usual level of ketones in your blood or urine, but not high enough to cause acidosis. Ketones are a chemical your body produces when it burns stored fat. Some people choose a low-carb diet to help with weight loss. While there is some controversy over their safety, low-carb diets are generally fine. Talk to your doctor before beginning any extreme diet plan. DKA is the leading cause of death in people under 24 years old who have diabetes. The overall death rate for ketoacidosis is 2 to 5 percent. People under the age of 30 make up 36 percent of DKA cases. Twenty-seven percent of people with DKA are between the ages of 30 and 50, 23 percent are between the ages of 51 and 70, and 14 percent are over the age of 70. Ketosis may cause bad breath. Ket Continue reading >>

What Does Dr Tiny Nair Think About A Ketogenic High-fat Diet In Terms Of Its Effects On Health, Especially The Heart?

What Does Dr Tiny Nair Think About A Ketogenic High-fat Diet In Terms Of Its Effects On Health, Especially The Heart?

Human systems use protein, carbohydrate and fat from diet. Fat gives a lot of calorie and is traditionally thought to be the culprit of weight gain and cardiovascular disease. Low carb keto diet means restricting carb to a very low or undetectable levels. This makes little glucose available (which is the primary fuel of the body), leading to breakdown of stored glycogen in Liver. When Glycogen is exhausted, body uses fat to produce energy. In essence, a keto diet changes body’s nutritional pathway from carb to fat (burning more fat). Very Low carb “Keto” diet means the body generates ketones (a acidic metabolic byproduct) which is used as a fuel. Many studies have shown beneficial effects of low carb diet on metabolic disease and weight loss. My View Indian diet is very high in carb (Rice, chappathy), so restricting carbohydrates is good, and I support it. I myself take a very small amount of carbohydrate. Such diet has low carb dose, but does not induce ketosis like a crash keto diet. Crash low carb diets There are problems of inducing ketosis. The resulting acidosis may temporarily disable many enzyme systems and change bodies metabolism. Many people feel down and bad on starting such diet (keto Flu). Also the safety of increasing fat in diet (may increase LDL) is unknown. Take Home diet I believe that any dietary change has to be gentle. Our system is used to take a particular diet right from our childhood and trying to radically change it in one day may not be a good idea. I would recommend a diet low in carb, controlled and moderated fat and protein; vegetables and fruits a plenty; and red meat, dairy and bakery the least. A crash diet, as the name suggests, might result in a crash. Continue reading >>

I Want To Lose My Weight, But My Schedule Is Too Tight For Me To Go Out For Jogging Or Exercises. Is There Some Way Where I Can Lose My Weight In My Daily Routine, Like Some Diet Tips?

I Want To Lose My Weight, But My Schedule Is Too Tight For Me To Go Out For Jogging Or Exercises. Is There Some Way Where I Can Lose My Weight In My Daily Routine, Like Some Diet Tips?

Walking is OK for circulation and lymphatic flow, but it has a suppressing effect on weight loss. Timewise, you'd be more likely to get weight loss results from interval training. A few minutes of intense exercise, with heart-rate recover afterwards, builds aerobic fitness way more efficiently than walking. So walking that you have to do is OK (walking to your car, walking through the grocery store, walking to the file room), but elective walking will largely waste your time. Buy a heart rate wrist watch and spend 5-9 minutes per day doing intense exercise (sprinting, vigorous dancing, fill in the blank) under the guidance of your heart rate and recovery rate. Diet tips are plentiful. The questions are (1) whether they work for you, and (2) whether they are sustainable (the weight lost stays lost). These could be: A. Switching to coconut oil as a dietary staple. Eliminate the standard temperate vegetable oils from your diet. Tropical oils have a high content of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are too fluid to store as is in fat cells, and the freed MCTs are passively transported into cells and mitochondria for beta oxidation (fat burning). This plays to item B. Mammals eating equivalent calories lose weight on MCT fat and gain weight on long-chain fat. B. Avoid overeating carbohydrates (except rarely). Carbs are converted into fat by the body when they exceed caloric needs. The body has two diet-dependent metabolic energy states (1) carb-burning mode (the default system) where fat is synthesized from excess carb, and (2) fat-burning mode (the back-up system) where carb is synthesized from fat-derived glycerol and amino acids. Avoiding eating excess carbs all the time keeps you from getting stuck in the default energy mode. And periodic carb loading exercises th Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

Fast Facts On Ketosis ~ Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. As opposed to glycolysis, ketosis metabolizes fat to provide energy. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes. In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed. For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body’s “fat burning” mode. Starving Cancer: Ketogenic Diet a Key to Recovery Get your FREE Comprehensive Keto Beginners Guide HERE Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis? Hint: It Can Help You Burn Fat & Suppress Your Appetite

What Is Ketosis? Hint: It Can Help You Burn Fat & Suppress Your Appetite

We’ve longed been told that calorie restriction, increasing exercise and reducing dietary fat intake are the keys to weight loss. But, if you’ve ever attempted to control your weight by subsisting on fewer calories — especially from mostly bland “diet foods”— you’re already probably aware that this typically produces minimal results and is extremely hard to stick with long-term or consistently. Considering the high rates of obesity now facing most developed nations — along with an increased risk for health conditions like diabetes or heart problems as a result — researchers have been anxiously working on how to suppress appetite and achieve weight loss in a healthy, sustainable manner. The keto diet has emerged over the past several decades as one potential answer to this large-scale weight loss problem. (1) While there are some differences in opinion, depending on who you ask, regarding the best approach to very low-carb dieting, studies consistently show that the ketogenic diet (also called the keto diet) produces not only substantial weight loss for a high percentage of people who adhere to it, but also other important health benefits such as reductions in seizures, markers of diabetes and more. The keto diet revolves around eating foods that are high in natural fats, consuming only moderate protein and severely restricting the number of carbs eaten each day. Even if you don’t have much weight to lose, entering into a state of ketosis can be helpful for other reasons — such as for improved energy levels, mental capabilities and mood stabilization. What Is Ketosis? Ketosis is the result of following the ketogenic diet, which is why it’s also sometimes called “the ketosis diet.” Ketosis takes place when glucose from carbohydrate foods (like Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet

The Ketogenic Diet

With the whole fitness and health field booming in the last couple of years, a lot of new information has come out, which is definitely a good thing, but big words and new information come with that making it a little overwhelming for a good portion of the general public. Ketosis has recently become a new tool to use so people can reach different health and fitness related goals. Specifically, ketosis is a metabolic state where the body’s energy comes from ketone bodies in the blood, instead of being in a state of glycolysis where blood glucose provides the usual energy for us. I’ll get a bit more into detail here in a minute and break down what all of that means. Ketosis is not to be confused with ketoacidosis which is basically an extreme state of ketosis. Ketoacidosis is usually related to type 1 diabetes where the liver breaks down fats and even proteins, as well as prolonged alcoholism. What is Ketosis and what is it used for? “Ketosis is a nutritional process that is characterized by blood serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5mM, with low levels of insulin and blood glucose (Phinney, 2011).” Basically, this just means that there is an elevated level of ketones being produced in the body and in the blood which is called “hyperketonemia.” Long-term ketosis can result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet or a ketogenic diet. The big thing with ketone bodies, at least in the fitness world, is that ketones can be used by the different cells of the body as fuel instead of the typical glucose that most people’s bodies use as fuel. This allows the body to use fats as a more prominent fuel source to lose fat mass while preserving muscle mass. That reason is why ketosis is sometimes called the body’s “fat burning” mode (Paoli). Ket Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Diagnosis Ketosis is diagnosed by clinical signs; sodium nitroprusside tablets or ketosis dipsticks may be used to identify ketones in the urine or plasma. In dairy cattle, blood glucose is typically less than 40 mg/dl, total blood ketones >30 mg/dl, and milk ketones >10 mg/dl. In small ruminants, blood glucose levels found to be below 25 mg/dl and ketonuria are good diagnostic indicators. Often ketones can be smelled in the cow’s breath and milk. In prepartum cattle and in lactating cows, blood levels of NEFA greater than 1000 uEq/l and 325–400 uEq/l are abnormal (Gerloff and Herdt, 2009). Triglyceride analysis of liver biopsy specimens is useful. 1 Bovine Ketosis Bovine ketosis is actually at least three different syndromes that occur in cows during lactation (Kronfeld, 1980; Kronfeld et al., 1983). The syndromes are characterized by anorexia, depression (usually), ketonemia, ketolactia, keton-uria, hypoglycemia, and decreased milk production. The three syndromes are underfeeding ketosis, alimentary ketosis, and spontaneous ketosis. Underfeeding ketosis occurs when a dairy cow receives insufficient calories to meet lactational demands plus body maintenance. This version of ketosis can be conveniently divided into nutritional underfeeding ketosis and secondary (or complicated) ketosis. The former occurs when the cow has a normal appetite but is given an insufficient quantity of feed or a diet with low metabolic energy density. The latter occurs when a cow has some other disease, such as hypocalcemia, mastitis, and metritis, which suppresses appetite and causes the cow to consume insufficient nutrients. In most respects, underfeeding ketosis resembles starvation ketosis explained earlier, except that there is the additional caloric and glycemic burden of milk produc Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

What Is It Like To Go On A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is It Like To Go On A Ketogenic Diet?

It's do-able. Some people love it and some people hate it. Personally, I find that nutritional ketosis is almost ideal for me, whereas "normal" eating with lots of carbs in my diet leads to feelings of non-satiety, drowsiness, mood swings, insulin spikes, bloating, and sometimes nausea. A ketogenic diet consists of 70-80% calories from fat, 15-25% calories from protein, and 0-5% calories from net carbohydrates (carbs). You must restrict your daily net carbs to 20-40g daily. (total grams carbs) - (grams fiber) = (net grams carbs) Your transition period depends on a few factors: how strictly you limit your carbohydrate intake, how much energy you expend day-to-day, and how much energy in the form of glucose and glycogen you have stored in your body currently. My transition period takes 3 days. Day 1: This is an easy day. Your blood is still filled with circulating glucose, and any deficit will be taken from the glycogen in your liver to be converted to glucose. You may feel hunger pangs by the afternoon, and a small dip in insulin, which will feel normal to you because this is what happens every day on a normal diet and you are used to it. Day 2: This is an easy day, too. Your body is happily pulling glycogen from your liver, converting it to glucose, and all is well. Any small amount of carbs that you consume are burned away, nothing is being stored. You may feel the typical afternoon slowdown and hunger, as on day 1. Day 3: Hard day. Your body has been (or is nearly) depleted of glucose and glycogen. The small amount of carbs that you consume are not enough to fuel your brain. You have a feeling of satiety from all the fat you are consuming, but you may feel achy, have headaches, and feel sluggish. Your body is alerting you to the lack of glucose and glycogen. It will t Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity And Glucose Tolerance Are Altered By Maintenance On A Ketogenic Diet

Insulin Sensitivity And Glucose Tolerance Are Altered By Maintenance On A Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet (KD) is a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet that is used for a variety of health-related effects. This type of diet is effective at suppressing seizure activity in children with refractory epilepsy (1) and has perhaps more commonly been implemented as a dietary strategy by which weight maintenance or weight loss is the desired outcome. It has been demonstrated that restriction of dietary carbohydrates results in positive effects on cardiovascular parameters. Consuming this type of diet favorably affects body adiposity and improves features of metabolic syndrome in humans (2,3,4,5,6). Although studies evaluating the efficacy and metabolic effects of KDs have increased in recent years, the effects of macronutrient-controlled diets remain controversial in the literature. Insulin has potent short-term and long-term effects on energy intake and glucose homeostasis. In the short term, insulin release is cephalic; the brain initiates insulin secretion by directing messages through the vagus nerves to the pancreas as opposed to direct pancreatic stimulation of insulin-secreting cells. Cephalic insulin is most readily observed at the onset of a meal and consists of a short burst of insulin that is preabsorptive with regard to the ingested food. After consumption of a meal, insulin secretion increases and is sustained, because one of insulin’s roles is to prepare the body for the increase in glucose that accompanies food intake and to control the increased levels and use of glucose (7). In the long term, insulin’s role as an adiposity signal is well known, with increased plasma insulin levels resulting from increased body weight. Together, the short- and long-term effects of insulin allow for proper glucose homeostasis and assist in the regulation of body wei Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis

If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. Where do these misperceptions come from? Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. And some people simply make mistakes. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it Ketosis is a metabolic state where you get most of your daily fuel from fat instead of carbs. Your body becomes ketogenic when it has limited access to glucose and needs to turn to another energy source for primary fuel. If you eat a very low-carb diet, you are restricting the glucose available to your body, which causes your body to turn to fat to burn. This may result in a state of ketosis. Note that not all low-carb diets produce a ketogenic state. It depends on how much you restrict your carbohydrate intake. If you are eating between 20-50 grams of carbohydrates per day, you will generally go into a ketogenic state. If you eat more than that, you may never actually establish ketosis. Where does the name "ketosis" come from While you Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis (from A Fat-rich Diet) Affect Body Temperature?

Does Ketosis (from A Fat-rich Diet) Affect Body Temperature?

One finds a minor increase in metabolism early in ketosis, especially so when consuming MCTs. MCTs are converted into ketone bodies in their first pass through the liver. Humans do not store those well and metabolize them fairly quickly. Something similar happens with consumed ethanol. Ask yourself why metabolism decreases after dieting. How does the hypothalamus detect food shortage? It can’t do so from circulating ketone bodies or free fatty acids. Those are maintained from fat stores even when one is starving. It does that through glucose and insulin levels. On a strict ketogenic diet, I was found to have both low TSH and low T4. Normally, if T4 is low, TSH is raised to restore the required metabolism. Low T4 results in decreased basal metabolism. My condition was called central hypothyroidism and commonly seen only in patients who have suffered major disease or trauma. It reversed on restoration of a more normal diet. A true ketogenic diet is rather extreme in that it requires restriction of protein as well as carbs. Roughly half of ingested protein becomes glucose on its first pass through the liver. Continue reading >>

Why Do Some People Believe A High Fat Diet, With The Intent To Limit Carbohydrates To Induce A State Of Ketosis And Allow The Body To Run Predominantly Off Of Fat For Energy, Is Ideal For Optimal Health?

Why Do Some People Believe A High Fat Diet, With The Intent To Limit Carbohydrates To Induce A State Of Ketosis And Allow The Body To Run Predominantly Off Of Fat For Energy, Is Ideal For Optimal Health?

Some of us have found with a series of self experiments that we feel better on low carb higher fat diets. Over time I've tried being a vegan, being a vegetarian, raw foods, eating just a whole foods diet, high whole grains..... so on and on. After several years on LCHF I've found that eliminating the vast majority of carbs helps 1) keep my blood sugar in a reasonable range - this has such a huge range of health effects that I won't even try to list them. 2) results in a very low triglyceride level and high HDL cholesterol level 3) keeps my moods even. Anxiety and depression have virtually disappeared. Ketosis is known for being beneficial for a variety of neurological problems. When I have slipped off eating this way a variety of unpleasant symptoms return. My diet is highly nutrient rich - I eat pastured/grass fed meats and eggs, wild fish, a huge variety of green vegetables - primarily leafy, butter, cheese and other fats from healthy animals, healthy vegetable fats - coconut, avocado, olives. Some nuts, limited quantities of berries, lots of herbs, brightly colored veg that aren't too high in carbs. This kind of diet can be appropriate for many people, not just Inuits! It may or may not be related to genetics (my guess would be probably), but this could include many groups. My background is primarily northern European, with most of my ancestors likely being exposed to agriculture no more that 3 to 5,000 years ago. There are cases of Pacific Island groups who had traditionally a diet very high in coconut fats. When moving to NZ and eating a lower fat diet, they suffer tremendously from obesity, T2 diabetes and other modern illnesses. There is considerable scientific evidence that LCHF diets are beneficial for a variety of conditions. Rather than try to cite all those Continue reading >>

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