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Ketosis Kidney Stones

Dangers Associated With Ketogenic Diets

Dangers Associated With Ketogenic Diets

Whether you go on a ketogenic diet for weight loss or to manage a health condition, you'll be eating fewer carbohydrates, much more fat and moderately more protein than on a typical diet. You should talk to your doctor before attempting this form of diet as it does pose some risks. When on the ketogenic diet, your body uses fat for energy rather than its standard fuel, carbohydrates. At the beginning, your body has to adjust to using a different fuel source. If the diet is initiated too quickly, or the body is having a difficult time adjusting, you can experience low blood sugar levels -- and the fatigue, headaches and other side effects that come along with it. This is typically temporary, and once the body is fully in ketosis, blood sugar levels remain very stable and typically lower than average, according to a study published in 2008 in "Epilepsia." Ketones are an acid. Therefore, when you are in ketosis, your blood can become more acidic. However, the body is very good at adapting and will produce more bicarbonate to help buffer the acid present in the body. Despite this, you should regularly check blood values to ensure the body is appropriately adjusting for the increased acidic environment. Left untreated, acidosis can lead to kidney stones and bone breakdown. Acidosis is easily managed by the addition of baking soda mixed in water or a variety of pharmaceutical buffers, all of which need to be calculated by knowledgeable health professional for regular monitoring and adjustments -- meaning you should be medically supervised and shouldn't attempt to manage it on your own. Kidney Stones Kidney stones, otherwise called nephrolithiasis, can be a rare side effect of the ketogenic diet. The "Journal of Child Neurology" reports a 3 to 10 percent incidence of kidney st Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is a ketogenic diet safe for you? Is a ketogenic diet safe? Before you try this at home… First and foremost, if you pick up a copy of Jimmy Moore and Dr. Eric Westman’s excellent new book, Keto Clarity (which I highly recommend–see my review here) and feel (understandably) inspired to immediately embark on a ketogenic diet, I would caution anyone with a serious chronic health problem, especially anyone who is taking prescription medications, not to attempt a ketogenic diet on his/her own without medical supervision. Medications and Early Ketosis Even though I personally believe in the power of ketogenic diets to improve and even reverse many chronic illnesses, from diabetes to chronic fatigue to mood disorders, the diet does this by causing very real shifts in body chemistry that can have a major impact on medication dosages and side effects, especially during the first few weeks. Examples of problematic situations include sudden drops in blood pressure for those on blood pressure medications (such as Lasix, Lisinopril, and Atenolol), and sudden drops in blood sugar for those on diabetes medications (especially insulin). These changes in blood pressure and blood sugar are very positive and healthy, but the presence of medications can artificially intensify these effects and cause extreme and sometimes dangerous reactions unless your dosage is carefully monitored by you and your clinician in the first month or so. Another important example of a medicine that would require careful monitoring is Lithium, an antidepressant and mood stabilizing medicine. The ketogenic diet causes the body to let go of excess water during the first few days, which can cause Lithium to become more concentrated in the blood, potentially rising to uncomfortable or even toxic levels. These Continue reading >>

Is Keto And Ketosis Safe?

Is Keto And Ketosis Safe?

The ketogenic diet and ketosis are safe. Not only are they safe, but they are useful in helping people with many different conditions. The ketogenic diet has helped cancer patients, people with diabetes (type 1 and type 2), women with polycystic ovary syndrome, people with heart disease, and many others. So, where does the rumor that the ketogenic diet and ketosis may not be safe come from? Well, it starts with ketones. Rumors Spread Like Ketones in an Insulin Deficient Body One of the primary goals of the ketogenic diet is to enter ketosis (a normal metabolic process when ketones are produced for fuel). Ketosis is primarily regulated by the liver, which helps produce enough ketones to meet the body’s needs. However, ketone production can get out of hand when insulin is deficient, leading to ketoacidosis. This may be where the rumor that keto and ketosis are not safe came from. Ketoacidosis — A Serious Condition That Is Not Caused By The Ketogenic Diet Ketoacidosis is a serious condition caused by uncontrolled diabetes. It is brought on by being born without the ability to produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) or living a lifestyle that promotes insulin resistance (type 2 diabetes). In both cases, there isn’t enough insulin to tell that cells that energy is available (insulin deficiency). The lack of insulin signaling causes the fat cells and liver cells to go into starvation mode, even after a calorically dense meal. The fat cells begin to dump triglycerides into the blood to provide the other cells with energy because the cells are perceiving that there is no fuel available. Meanwhile, the liver starts mobilizing stored glycogen and using gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis to provide the body with sugar and ketones that it doesn’t need. All of this causes bloo Continue reading >>

Ketosis Kidney Stone Prevention – Dr Eric Berg

Ketosis Kidney Stone Prevention – Dr Eric Berg

Research Links Kidney Stone Guide Book – an in depth guide to kidney stones. Kidney Stone Photos – There are many types and appearances Important Pages from within the Kidney Stone Guidebook How potassium citrate Read more… Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Dangers Of Zero-carb Diets, Iv: Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are a frequent occurrence on the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. [1, 2, 3] About 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones per year, compared with one in several thousand among the general population. [4] On children who follow the ketogenic diet for six years, the incidence of kidney stones is about 25% [5]. A 100-fold odds ratio is hardly ever seen in medicine. There must be some fundamental cause of kidney stones that is dramatically promoted by clinical ketogenic diets. Just over half of ketogenic diet kidney stones are composed of uric acid and just under half of calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid. Among the general public, about 85% of stones are calcium oxalate mixes and about 10% are uric acid. So, roughly speaking, uric acid kidney stones are 500-fold more frequent on the ketogenic diet and calcium oxalate stones are 50-fold more frequent. Causes are Poorly Understood In the nephrology literature, kidney stones are a rather mysterious condition. Wikipedia has a summary of the reasons offered in the literature for high stone formation on the ketogenic diet [4]: Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons: Excess calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria) occurs due to increased bone demineralisation with acidosis. Bones are mainly composed of calcium phosphate. The phosphate reacts with the acid, and the calcium is excreted by the kidneys. Hypocitraturia: the urine has an abnormally low concentration of citrate, which normally helps to dissolve free calcium. The urine has a low pH, which stops uric acid from dissolving, leading to crystals that act as a nidus for calcium stone formation. Many institutions traditionally restricted the water intake of patients on the diet to Continue reading >>

How Low-carb Diets May Be Causing More Kidney Stones

How Low-carb Diets May Be Causing More Kidney Stones

Like many busy people, David Crossley often used to find himself so wrapped up in his working day that he would go without lunch, and often barely stopped for a cup of tea. In fact, David, 63, a musculoskeletal therapist from Birmingham, admits: 'I would often be so busy at the clinic that I'd forget to drink any liquid at all, other than the odd cup of tea or coffee. It had been the same way for years - although I would drink more water at weekends.' Last year, this habit caught up with him. He noticed a vague ache in his abdomen, stretching around to his back. 'It wasn't agonising but it just didn't feel quite right, so I went to the GP,' he says. 'As I had some bloating, he sent me for an ultrasound.' This revealed two large stones in his right kidney - a direct result, his doctors believe, of his low fluid intake. A CT scan showed that the stones were so large (6 mm across) they could not be passed naturally, and he needed surgery. One in ten of us will develop a kidney stone, and the numbers are rising dramatically. They are the result of waste products in the blood forming crystals inside the kidneys, which eventually build up into a solid lump. They can be excruciatingly painful - on a level, say experts, with childbirth. The stones often remain symptomless while they're in the kidney. They start causing pain - known as renal colic - once they travel down the ureter, the narrow tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. 'Renal colic is caused by the stone suddenly blocking the ureter,' says Mr Leye Ajayi, consultant urological surgeon at the Hospital of St John & St Elizabeth, London. The pain often comes on suddenly and can cause the patient to 'writhe around in agony', he adds. The pain can be intense enough to cause nausea and vomiting. Once on th Continue reading >>

​what Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is It Safe?

​what Is The Ketogenic Diet And Is It Safe?

The ketogenic diet is all the rage in the low-carbohydrate dieting world. It’s so low-carb in fact that many people wonder if it’s a safe long-term diet. How is the keto diet (short for “ketogenic”) diet different than the Atkins diet plan? Is it an effective and healthy means of weight loss? Is it safe??? These are just some of the many questions that we hear surrounding the keto diet in the health and fitness community. While any diet that requires sacrifice and adjustments to your daily routine (and this diet requires more of that than most, with the exception of veganism) will take some effort to maintain, the overall benefits may be worth the commitment. A variety of celebrities, fitness personalities, and doctors endorse the ketogenic eating plan and its philosophies for overall health improvement and quick weight loss. According to advocates of the ketogenic diet, forcing your body into ketosis could be the answer to long-term fat loss and better health. For years, we’ve heard about the benefits of low-carb eating and consuming healthy fats. We absolutely agree with the low-carb approach for weight loss, because it is the main principle in our 21-Day Fat Loss Challenge. Below, we will explore what the ketogenic diet entails, including the change in lifestyle, and discuss its safety. The Ketogenic Diet What is the keto diet? You might already know that the keto diet is a low-carb diet plan. You might not know that it was originally designed for patients with epilepsy, as Dr. Axe discusses in his post on the subject. Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medical center initially found that fasting helped treat seizures in patients with epilepsy. How did this turn into what we know as the keto diet today? Since fasting wasn’t a healthy long-term option for elimin Continue reading >>

Importance Of Fluid Intake For Patients On The Ketogenic Diet

Importance Of Fluid Intake For Patients On The Ketogenic Diet

For children on the ketogenic (keto) diet, keeping hydrated is essential to prevent constipation and kidney stones. The high-fat content of the diet makes it more difficult for the body to break down the nutrients in foods and convert it to energy if it is not accompanied by water, which is quickly processed by the body. Your child’s keto meal plan includes their ideal fluid intake. To help prevent dehydration, your child can always have more fluid than what’s recommended. Dehydration is caused by a decreased fluid intake, increased sweating due to hot, humid weather, and an increase in physical activity without increasing fluids. Other causes can include fever, gastrointestinal issues such as vomiting and diarrhea, or viral illness such as rotavirus and norovirus. Signs of dehydration include: Dry mouth and lips No tears when crying Decrease in urine out-put Urine that is no longer light straw-colored Some children will cooperate when you tell them to drink more fluids. Other children may need a bit more coaxing. Try these ideas to encourage your child to increase their fluid intake: Novelty straws Decorative cups Popsicles made with Kool-Aid or Crystal Light (properly diluted) Caffeine-free ice tea Snow cones (if you purchase commercially made ice from a snow cone vendor, please confirm the ice is sugar-free) Sugar free Jell-O also counts as a liquid, but it is also a protein and should only be used as part of the meal plan Stickers and other reward systems — set a specific intake as the goal, and turn it into a game Remember, if your child is showing signs of dehydration, you should take them to the emergency room for evaluation. If intravenous fluids are required, a saline solution should be used. Make sure you tell the emergency room medical team that your ch Continue reading >>

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

Today we officially kickoff this brand new podcast dedicated to answering listeners questions about the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet. It’s called Keto Talk with Jimmy Moore & The Doc (now available to listen and subscribe on iTunes) featuring 10-year veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles.” These two are a keto power pair ready to take on your most pressing questions about this way of eating. KEY QUOTE: “If you cheat on your ketogenic diet, then you are at risk of a kidney stone or gout. The point is if you’re gonna cheat, you’re gonna pay for it.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 1: – The beginning of this new podcast devoted to keto – How Adam uses ketogenic diets with his patients – Adam’s father who died early from diabetes issues – Follow Jimmy and Adam on Periscope – Whether keto creates or prevents kidney stones – Why it’s not a good idea to cheat on your low-carb diet – How cheating, not keto, is what leads to gout – Whether a ketogenic diet causes heart palpitations – How to best balance your electrolytes starting keto – The problem with caffeine on your cortisol levels WORLD’S 1ST REUSABLE BREATH KETONE ANALYZER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipTHE WORLD’S FIRST EXOGENOUS KETONES SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipLINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 1 – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Get the 2015 Ketonix breath ketone analyzer from Ketonix.com – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Try the KETO//OS exogenous ketones supplement – Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” – Dr. Adam Nally, DO from DocMuscles.com – Jimmy Moore on Periscope Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

33: Kidney Stones, Fat Offsetting Carbs, Losing Too Much Weight, Dairy-free Keto, Medications

33: Kidney Stones, Fat Offsetting Carbs, Losing Too Much Weight, Dairy-free Keto, Medications

If you are interested in the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet, then this is the podcast for you. We zero in exclusively on all the questions people have about how being in a state of nutritional ketosis and the effects it has on your health. There are a lot of myths about keto floating around out there and our two amazing cohosts are shooting them down one at a time. Keto Talk is cohosted by 10-year veteran health podcaster and international bestselling author Jimmy Moore from "Livin' La Vida Low-Carb" and Arizona osteopath and certified bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from "Doc Muscles" who thoroughly share from their wealth of experience on the ketogenic lifestyle each and every Thursday. We love hearing from our fabulous Ketonian listeners with new questions--send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you're not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes and listened to the past episodes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Adam share more keto wisdom with you today in Episode 33. ***THANK YOU to the following Ketonians for their generous donations towards this podcast: Ben, Glyn, Mary, Mandy, Rhonda, David, Susan, Simon, Jennifer, Glenn, Gina, Toni, Mindy, Lidia, Mary, Amy, Kimberly, Ana, Laura, Chilango, Christine, Jason, Penny, and Aleisha.*** HELP KEEP KETO TALK ON THE AIR: MAKE A DONATION HERE Here are the new iTunes reviews of Keto Talk this week: - Did my ketogenic diet lead to the development of kidney stones? Hello Jimmy and Adam, I have been eating keto off and on for the past three years. In April, I got really sick to my stomach for a couple of days and started to get a strange pain in my left side. It got progressively worse until I had to go to the doctor about it. By this Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

Ketosis – Advantaged Or Misunderstood State? (part I)

As The Eating Academy approaches its first birthday in about a month, I figured it was as good a time as any to put together some thoughts on a subject I get asked about with great frequency. (For those wondering when I’ll get to Part X of The Straight Dope on Cholesterol, the answer is, “hopefully before the end of the year.”) A few months ago I was planning a post along the lines of “the 10 things you need to know about ketosis,” but I’m now thinking that might be putting the proverbial cart before the horse. So, let’s start with a more fundamental set of questions. In part I of this post I will see to it (assuming you read it) that you’ll know more about ketosis than just about anyone, including your doctor or the majority of “experts” out there writing about this topic. Before we begin, a disclaimer in order: If you want to actually understand this topic, you must invest the time and mental energy to do so. You really have to get into the details. Obviously, I love the details and probably read 5 or 6 scientific papers every week on this topic (and others). I don’t expect the casual reader to want to do this, and I view it as my role to synthesize this information and present it to you. But this is not a bumper-sticker issue. I know it’s trendy to make blanket statements – ketosis is “unnatural,” for example, or ketosis is “superior” – but such statements mean nothing if you don’t understand the biochemistry and evolution of our species. So, let’s agree to let the unsubstantiated statements and bumper stickers reside in the world of political debates and opinion-based discussions. For this reason, I’ve deliberately broken this post down and only included this content (i.e., background) for Part I. What is ketosis? Ketosis is Continue reading >>

Health Risks Of The Ketogenic Diet

Health Risks Of The Ketogenic Diet

They are many potential benefits to the ketogenic diet, but there are also a number of potentially serious health risks. It appears that most of these health risks can be mitigated with care. 2 Health Risks The list of health risks for the Ketogenic Diet can be rather intimidating. It's worth remembering that all diets have risks associated with them, and many of these risks are severe. In some ways the health risks of the ketogenic diet are better understood than most diets because the ketogenic diet is typically given under medical supervision, and adverse effects are well documented. It should also be noted that the patients that have been studied on the ketogenic diet are often children with severe epilepsy or adults with morbid obesity. In fact, an important source of information on the ketogenic diet comes from obese subjects undergoing complete fasts. This may increase the relative risk of the ketogenic diet. There have been two reported cases of sudden death of children on the Ketogenic Diet, probably due to selenium deficiency causing heart failure[1]. Selenium deficiency can occur rapidly; one child was diagnosed with selenium deficiency and related heart problems before their scheduled 3 month selenium test[2]. In addition, a study of 20 children on the Ketogenic Diet found heart rhythm abnormalities and heart enlargement in 3 (15%, diet duration 13 ± 8.4 months), and one had severe dilated cardiomyopathy[3]. The effected children has normal selenium levels, but there was a significant correlation was found between the heart rhythm abnormality (QTc) and both bicarbonate and blood ketones, suggesting the level of acidosis or ketosis may be important factors. Low carbohydrate diets cause of the kidneys to excrete more sodium. This is known as "natriuresis of s Continue reading >>

Gallstones And Low Carb

Gallstones And Low Carb

Gallbladder in pink Do gallstones improve or worsen on a low carb / high fat diet? It’s a common question with an interesting answer. The gallbladder stores bile, a yellow-green fluid manufactured in the liver. The bile is used to digest the fat you eat. The question is: Is it good or bad for the gall bladder to eat fat? The conventional fat phobic answer The usual medical belief today is that fatty food can result in gall stones. This is because what happens if you already have gallstones in the gallbladder and eat fat: A gallstone can get stuck on the way to the intestines and give you a gallstone attack (pain in the top right part of your stomach). The conventional advice is thus to eat low fat – and take pain killers if you get a gallstone attack. If the attacks continue the gallbladder is removed by routine surgery and the problem usually goes away. Probably with the side effect of slightly decreased ability to absorb fat and nutrients from what you eat (there is a reason we have gallbladders). The conventional low fat advice rarely makes gallstone disease go away. Instead it often gets worse with time, until surgery is necessary. That is hardly a coincidence. How to get gallstones If you eat low fat less bile is needed to digest your food. More bile thus stays in the gallbladder. Long enough, perhaps, for stones to form. It’s been shown that people who (instead of fat) eat more carbohydrates are at increased risk of gallstones. It all sounds logical. And there is even better evidence. The risk of low fat diets have been tested at least three times: Studies of extreme low fat diets In a study of 51 obese people using an extremely low fat low calorie diet (just one gram of fat a day!) the gallbladder was examined by ultrasound before the diet and after one and Continue reading >>

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