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Ketosis Kidney Stones

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

Preventing Kidney Stones May Be As Simple As Changing Your Diet

The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. New guidelines recommend people who have had a kidney stone increase their fluid intake so they have at least two liters of urine per day Increasing water consumption could decrease your risk of kidney stone recurrence by at least half By Dr. Mercola In the 1970s, less than 4 percent of Americans had suffered from kidney stones. By the 1990s, this had increased to more than 5 percent. Today, with rates continuing to rise, kidney stones will impact one in 10 US adults at some point during their lives1 -- usually between the ages of 20 and 50. In most cases, kidney stones pass without causing lasting damage, but the pain during passing can be excruciating. Kidney stones are also sometimes associated with lower back pain, stomach pain, nausea or vomiting, fever, and chills. Generally, the larger the stone, the more pain and symptoms it will cause. Sometimes aggressive treatments are needed to clear the stones, and each year, more than half a million people go to US emergency rooms due to kidney stones.2 Once you've had them, your risk of recurrence increases. About 35 percent to 50 percent of people will have another bout with kidney stones within five years unless changes are made.3 What type of changes? According to new guidelines issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP), one of the simplest strategies you can take is to drink more water. Staying Hydrated Lowers Your Risk of Recurrent Kidney Stones The number one risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. If you aren't drinking enough, your urine will have higher concentrations of substances that can precipitate out and form stones. Specifically, stone-forming chemicals include calcium, oxalate, urate, cysteine, xanthine Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Therapy And Anti-epileptic Medications

Ketogenic Therapy And Anti-epileptic Medications

Written by: Elizabeth Neal MSc PhD RD Research Dietitian, Matthew’s Friends Clinics Honorary Research Associate, UCL – Institute of Child Health Ketogenic therapy includes the classical ketogenic diet (KD), the medium chain triglyceride KD, the modified Atkins diet (MAD) (or variants which may be termed modified KD) and the low glycaemic index treatment. Many studies, including randomised trials, have reported reduced seizure frequency and severity in children and adults receiving ketogenic therapy. These diets are usually used to treat intractable seizures which have not responded to appropriate medication so most who start them will be on at least one concurrent anti-epileptic drug (AED); a reduced dependence on AEDs being a goal and frequently attained outcome of ketogenic therapy. This insight reviews the literature and discusses evidence for any interaction between ketogenic therapy and AEDs. 1. Does ketogenic therapy affect blood levels of AEDs? Four studies have examined this question. The first measured plasma levels of valproic acid (VPA), lamotrigine, topiramate, clonazepam and phenobarbital in 51 children on the classical KD. Although some AED doses were adjusted, no significant effect on plasma concentrations was seen after three months on the diet and the authors concluded it is not necessary to adjust drug doses due to pharmacokinetic interactions when starting a KD (1). Another study measured plasma levels of VPA and phenobarbital in 36 children and adolescents after one month on the classical KD given as a ketogenic formula either on its own or providing 80% of diet intake. Doses of AEDs were not changed during the month (although some patients had concomitant benzodiazepine doses changed during this time). Concentrations of phenobarbital did not cha Continue reading >>

The Paleo Diet And Kidney Stones

The Paleo Diet And Kidney Stones

A long time ago…well, it was actually only about 3 years ago, but it certainly feels like a long time ago…when I first began my Nutritional Odyssey, one of the first stops on my quest, was the Ketogenic diet. I read Lyle McDonald’s book “The Ketogenic Diet”, and promptly lost 24lbs of pure body-fat over the next two months. I wasn’t interested in the Ketogenic Diet as it pertains to the form of the diet that some progressive doctors are prescribing to children with Epilepsy, I was more concerned about the weight-loss and body-building applications as they pertained to me. It was obvious to me at the time, that the general consensus was that there is a high risk of Kidney stones while on a Ketogenic diet, and that Potassium supplementation was highly recommended to combat this heightened risk. Why is there a higher risk of Kidney Stones while on a Ketogenic Diet? Kidney stones are a frequent occurrence on the ketogenic diet for epilepsy. [1, 2, 3] About 1 in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones per year, compared with one in several thousand among the general population. [] On children who follow the ketogenic diet for six years, the incidence of kidney stones is about 25% []. A 100-fold odds ratio is hardly ever seen in medicine. There must be some fundamental cause of kidney stones that is dramatically promoted by clinical ketogenic diets. Just over half of ketogenic diet kidney stones are composed of uric acid and just under half of calcium oxalate mixed with calcium phosphate or uric acid. Among the general public, about 85% of stones are calcium oxalate mixes and about 10% are uric acid. So, roughly speaking, uric acid kidney stones are 500-fold more frequent on the ketogenic diet and calcium oxalate stones are 50-fold more frequent. Continue reading >>

To Ketone Or Not To Ketone: Mineral Salts

To Ketone Or Not To Ketone: Mineral Salts

Let me preface this article by stating that I am not affiliated, do not know any of these companies directly, and haven’t tested them in any way. Rather, due to the recent explosion of ketone supplements on the market, I wanted to cover the importance of considering mineral salt content of these supplements. Exogenous ketones are becoming more popular than ever as advancements in scientific research continue to show how they work to improve both health and performance. At first, the only options for delivering exogenous ketones were unpalatable ketone esters; however, now exogenous ketones can be taken in the form of ketone mineral salts that are easily blended and palatable in water. Making ketone mineral salts involves combining beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB) with mineral salts such as sodium, calcium, magnesium, or potassium. Before considering whether ketone supplements are a good option, most people immediately look at the salt load, and rightfully so. It is important to take into account the nutritional and health impact of not only the BHB, but to consider the minerals that are used to make the product. Although there is more current evidence on the effectiveness of ketone esters , ketone salt supplementation has the potential to provide additional benefits through the extra electrolytes/nutrients that are required to make the ketones. While ketone esters are expensive due to the manufacturing process involved in making them, ketone salts might be a more convenient option for both inducing a state of ketosis and elevating blood ketone levels for various reasons we will discuss separately. Let’s take a look at some of the facts and misconceptions about three of the minerals used to make ketone mineral salts: sodium, calcium, and magnesium. (Potassium is very hygro Continue reading >>

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

Can Keto//os Cause Kidney Stones?

The use of exogenous ketones is a new and novel technology. So the safety profile of a ketone supplement like KETO//OS begins to emerge as more research is being done. Often people are concerned about kidney or liver health when it comes to exogenous ketones. What the studies are actually finding, is that ketones, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB), is actually beneficial to the health of our liver and kidneys. There are also many other benefits of taking ketones as well. The risk of kidney stones can be a concern, as we know there is a small risk from a ketogenic diet standpoint. However, potassium supplementation decreases that risk of getting kidney stones substantially. Exogenous ketone and potassium supplementation while following a ketogenic diet, is an effective combination. To learn more about, and order exogenous ketones, go to the Prüvit online store. Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Is A Natural Treatment For The Symptoms Of Gout

The Ketogenic Diet Is A Natural Treatment For The Symptoms Of Gout

A new study published in the journal Cell Reports suggests that a ketogenic (high fat, low carb) diet may be helpful in treating the symptoms of gout. Gout is something that plagues more and more people every day, and it’s caused from uric acid buildup in the body. What is Gout? Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis that develops in some people who have high levels of uric acid in the blood. The acid can form needle-like crystals in a joint and cause sudden, severe episodes of pain, tenderness, redness, warmth and swelling Uric acid, a normal byproduct of metabolic processes, is typically dissolved in the blood and then excreted from the body through the urine. However, when the body is unable to properly break down uric acid, blood levels rise, and the excess is deposited in bodily tissues. When uric acid accumulates around the joints it is known as “tophi,” and can manifest as jelly like lumps under the skin. When uric acid crystals collect in the kidneys, it can result in kidney stones. The Role Of a Ketogenic Diet Ketogenic diet may protect against gout. … It is caused by either an excessive production or insufficient excretion of uric acid. In gout, the uric acid crystals sediment in tissues and fluids, triggering the body’s immune cells. Recent research out of the laboratory of Vishwa Deep Dixit, professor of comparative medicine and immunobiology at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, suggests that symptoms of gout may be managed with a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets are typically implemented for weight loss, or to treat childhood epilepsy. The diet involves a significant reduction of carbohydrate intake favoring moderate protein and high fat foods. This starves the central nervous system of glucose and prompts the liver to metabolise fats pro Continue reading >>

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

Ketosis – What Is That All About?

What’s it all about? Is it good for you? Is it bad for you? What’s it like? How do I ‘do’ ketosis? How do I know I’m in ketosis? The questions everyone who’s Banting wants the answers to. Ketosis, in chef speak, is quite simply a state your body enters once it has been deprived of glucose. Your body switches to burning fat for energy (stored fat or fat that you have eaten) instead of glucose. A side-effect of that process is the release of ketone bodies into the blood stream. When you’re starved of glucose, your body has no choice but to burn fat for fuel, so it needs little explanation as to why ketosis works at melting fat like a blow heater on an ice sculpture. Ketosis comes with some added extras, namely a commonly noted sense of euphoria or lucidity and increased energy levels. A downside includes toothbrush-proof halitosis, which stems from the secretion of ammonia through the lungs as a side effect of burning all that fat. Some people on low-carb diets have reported kidney stones, gallstones and a number of other ailments. Scientific research on both sides of this debate is being done all the time, but in our experience from talking to the members of our community and tracking their data, it is generally a case of what was done before they started Banting and not Banting itself. But, this post isn’t here to debate that, it serves as a ‘how to’ and not as a ‘you should’. Eat more buttery or creamy sauce on your steak and eat less steak. Your body can convert protein into glucose so too much meat will hinder your progress. What doIdo? Theoretically it is very easy. Avoid anything with high carbs in it. If you’re not sure what those might be, consult the Real Meal Revolution ‘Red List’. Even dipping your toe into the red list will ruin Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

Ketosis And Ketogenic Diet Symptoms

There are many symptoms and adverse effects reported by study groups on low carbohydrate diets such as the ketogenic diet. The main ketogenic diet symptoms are: headache, dizziness, presence of diarrhea and constipation, weakness, loss of concentration, bad breath, low blood pressure, increased heart rate, among many others. According to Dr. Mauro DiPasquale, a respected member of the international sports community as an athlete, administrator and physician, and author of the famous book “The Anabolic Diet”, he originally created this diet for bodybuilders and athletes, but since then he has developed other versions for the general public. This is a very interesting article about ketogenic diet from ncbi. about “Long-term effects of a ketogenic diet in obese patients”. He says that in the first week of the ketogenic diet the body is going through the metabolic shift from being a carb and muscle-burning machine to being a fat burner, and that can be very difficult. This is called the induction phase and people may have some symptoms including lethargy, dizziness, mental fogginess, irritability, and irregular bowels, depending on how your body reacts to the radical shift in macronutrients. Some people will suffer few symptoms, others will be very affected. Your energy can also drop and there might be a frequent feeling of you being hungry. That’s because the body is going through a readjustment phase. Due to the low amount of nutrients, especially vitamins and minerals, may also occur weakening of the immune system, leaving the body more susceptible to several infections. So, the discipline and persistence during the first week of the ketogenic diet is very important to experience the benefits later. The energy will come back and you will feel better. This will Continue reading >>

In Par Tner Ship With Primary Children’s Hosp I Ta L

In Par Tner Ship With Primary Children’s Hosp I Ta L

11 A ketogenic diet is a strict diet that is high in fat but includes a normal number of calories. Sometimes your child’s seizures can be controlled if they stay on this strict diet. How does a ketogenic diet control seizures? The ketogenic diet controls seizures by making your child’s body use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy. A high-fat diet creates an energy source called ketones, which power cells in the brain and heart. These cells create more brain energy, which can protect the brain from seizures. What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet is high in fat, has a normal amount of protein, and is low in carbohydrates. Your child’s diet must have all three to control seizures, and it must create enough ketones to generate energy in the brain. To do this, the diet is calculated in ratios like 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1. In a 4:1 ratio, for example, there is 4 times as much fat as protein and carbohydrates combined. The dietitian creates meal plans and recipes with the right amount of fat, protein, and carbohydrates for each meal. The ketogenic diet alone does not have enough vitamins or minerals. Your child must also take special vitamin and mineral supplements and drink enough fluids. If you feed your child through a tube, they can have a special ketogenic formula. If your child is bottle-fed, you can use the KetoCal formula. Is a ketogenic diet right for my child? Children 3–8 years old can usually try the ketogenic diet. Sometimes younger children can also try it. However, children younger than 3-years old must be watched carefully to make sure they grow properly. Older children may try the ketogenic diet, but the child’s family has to be motivated. Families have to promise to use the ketogenic diet for at least 2 months. If you Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

If medicine doesn't control seizures in epilepsy, sometimes doctors prescribe a ketogenic (or keto) diet. A ketogenic diet is a strict high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that can reduce, and sometimes stop, seizures. It's called "ketogenic" because it makes ketones in the body. Ketones are made when the body uses fat for energy. By replacing carbs with fat in the diet, the body burns more fat and makes more ketones. The ketogenic diet is prescribed by a doctor. Kids on the diet need to be followed closely by a dietitian to make sure they follow the diet and get the nutrients they need. The diet starts with fasting during an overnight hospital stay. Who Needs a Ketogenic Diet? Children with seizures that are not well-controlled by medicines (called intractable epilepsy) and severe epilepsy syndromes (such as infantile spasms or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome) might benefit from a ketogenic diet. Studies show that the ketogenic diet also may help treat other conditions, such as diabetes, obesity, and even cancer. How Does a Ketogenic Diet Work? Although the ketogenic diet for epilepsy has been around since 1920, doctors aren't exactly sure how the higher ketone levels works. Some seizure types seem to respond better than others to the ketogenic diet. In babies, the keto diet is given in formula. Young children may be fed by a tube that is place in the stomach by a surgeon. This helps the child stay on the diet. How Long Do Kids Need a Ketogenic Diet? You should know if a ketogenic diet works for your child within a few months. If it does, your doctor may recommend weaning your child off the diet after 2 years of seizure control. The weaning process is done over several months to avoid triggering seizures. Some people stay on a ketogenic diet for years. Are There Any Risks? The keto Continue reading >>

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, Low-carb Diets Explained

High-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, like The Atkins Diet, have been widely promoted as effective weight loss plans. These programs generally recommend that dieters get 30% to 50% of their total calories from protein. By comparison, the American Heart Association, the National Cholesterol Education Program, and the American Cancer Society all recommend a diet in which a smaller percentage of calories come from protein. Normally your body burns carbohydrates for fuel. When you drastically cut carbs, the body goes into a metabolic state called ketosis, and it begins to burn its own fat for fuel. When your fat stores become a primary energy source, you may lose weight. Some experts have raised concern about high-protein, low-carb diets. High cholesterol.Some protein sources -- like fatty cuts of meat, whole dairy products, and other high-fat foods -- can raise cholesterol, increasing your chance of heart disease. However, studies showed that people on the Atkins diet for up to 2 years actually had decreased “bad” cholesterol levels. Kidney problems. If you have any kidney problems, eating too much protein puts added strain on your kidneys. This could worsen kidney function. Osteoporosis and kidney stones. When you're on a high-protein diet, you may urinate more calcium than normal. There are conflicting reports, but some experts think this could make osteoporosis and kidney stones more likely. If you're considering a high-protein diet, check with your doctor or a nutritionist to see if it's OK for you. They can help you come up with a plan that will make sure you're getting enough fruits and vegetables, and that you're getting lean protein foods. Remember, weight loss that lasts is usually based on changes you can live with for a long time, not a temporary diet. Continue reading >>

Epilepsy Center | Ketogenic Diet

Epilepsy Center | Ketogenic Diet

Diet therapy for epilepsy Diet therapy can sometimes be a good alternative for childhood epilepsy when medications cannot control seizures or have intolerable side effects. While diet therapy is often worth trying in general, it can be especially helpful for certain epilepsy syndromes, such as myoclonic astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome). There are now a number of different diets that can be used for epilepsy: the Classic Ketogenic Diet, the Modified Atkins Diet, the Medium Chain Triglyceride Diet and the Low Glycemic Index Treatment Diet. The choice is made after the initial consultation, and depends on the epilepsy diagnosis, the child’s age and feeding habits, and family needs and preferences. Ketogenic diets are the treatment of choice for glucose transporter deficiency (GLUT1DS) and should be considered in pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH) and other mitochondrial disorders, even when these disorders do not cause seizures. Diet therapy takes care and dedication, but it may offer children a better chance of seizure control than trying a new anticonvulsant drug. Unfortunately, we don’t yet have good predictors of whether a child will respond to diet therapy, so we usually recommend a trial of three to four months. About the ketogenic diet Known for more than a century, the ketogenic diet has recently come back into use for epilepsy and has been shown to be effective for many children when drugs fail. It can provide control of seizures for about 30 percent of children with epilepsy. In its strictest form, the ketogenic diet provides more than 90 percent of its calories through fat (as compared to the 25 to 40 percent usually recommended for children). When we burn fat for energy, rather than glucose from carbohydrates, we produce compounds known as ketone bodi Continue reading >>

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

Today we officially kickoff this brand new podcast dedicated to answering listeners questions about the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet. It’s called Keto Talk with Jimmy Moore & The Doc (now available to listen and subscribe on iTunes) featuring 10-year veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles.” These two are a keto power pair ready to take on your most pressing questions about this way of eating. KEY QUOTE: “If you cheat on your ketogenic diet, then you are at risk of a kidney stone or gout. The point is if you’re gonna cheat, you’re gonna pay for it.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 1: – The beginning of this new podcast devoted to keto – How Adam uses ketogenic diets with his patients – Adam’s father who died early from diabetes issues – Follow Jimmy and Adam on Periscope – Whether keto creates or prevents kidney stones – Why it’s not a good idea to cheat on your low-carb diet – How cheating, not keto, is what leads to gout – Whether a ketogenic diet causes heart palpitations – How to best balance your electrolytes starting keto – The problem with caffeine on your cortisol levels WORLD’S 1ST REUSABLE BREATH KETONE ANALYZER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipTHE WORLD’S FIRST EXOGENOUS KETONES SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipLINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 1 – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Get the 2015 Ketonix breath ketone analyzer from Ketonix.com – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Try the KETO//OS exogenous ketones supplement – Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” – Dr. Adam Nally, DO from DocMuscles.com – Jimmy Moore on Periscope Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

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