diabetestalk.net

Ketosis Induction

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Low-carb Side Effects & How To Cure Them

Are you struggling while starting out on a low-carb or keto diet? Do you get headaches, leg cramps, constipation or any of the other more common side effects? Use the information on this page to avoid them – and feel great while losing weight. The main solution to most common problems when starting low carb is to increase the intake of water and salt. It’s even better to do it preventatively during the first week. If you do, you’ll most likely not experience any of these problems, or they’ll only be minor. Use one of the shortcuts below for specific problems – or just continue reading for all of them. Top 6 common problems when starting Less common issues on low carb Low-carb myths Leg cramps Leg cramps are not uncommon when starting a strict low-carb diet. It’s usually a minor issue if it occurs, but it can sometimes be painful. It’s a side effect of the loss of minerals, specifically magnesium, due to increased urination. Here’s how to avoid it: Drink plenty of fluid and get enough salt. This may reduce loss of magnesium and help prevent leg cramps. If needed, supplement with magnesium. Here’s a suggested dosage from the book The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Drs. Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney: Take 3 slow-release magnesium tablets like Slow-Mag or Mag 64 a day for 20 days, then continue taking 1 tablet a day afterwards. If the steps above are not enough and the problem is bothersome, consider increasing your carb intake somewhat. This should eliminate the problem. The more carbs you eat though, the weaker the impact of the low-carb diet. Bad breath On a strict low-carb diet some people experience a characteristic smell from their breath, a fruity smell that often remind people of nail polish remover. The smell is from acetone, a ket Continue reading >>

Quick Start Keto

Quick Start Keto

Low carbers know ketosis is the superhero of fat-burning. But what is ketosis? And how do you get into ketosis quickly? Keto FAQs and why it makes a difference in fat loss. 6 techniques to get into ketosis fast 3-Day rapid reach ketosis technique Try a few rapid keto techniques and eat specific low carb keto foods. Our quick start guide covers everything you need to reach ketosis fast. If carbs are limited to small amounts in your diet, your body relies on fat for energy. When you reach ketosis, fat burns rapidly and muscle tissue is spared. Why Does Keto Burn Fat Faster? To get into ketosis you’ll avoid sugar, leading to low insulin levels. Low insulin curbs hunger and accelerates fat-burning. Metabolizing fat and producing ketones burns more energy than metabolizing carbs. The result is a much higher calorie burn. How Do I Reach Ketosis? Ketosis happens when carbs are very low – usually when eating 20 to 50 grams of net carbs or less per day. (Carb grams from fiber are NOT counted in daily totals.) Everyone is different. Some low carbers must eat very low carb to reach ketosis. Typical Keto Ratio Getting into ketosis requires eating meals that are high in healthy fats and low in carbs. Protein grams should not exceed 20 % of total daily calories. Keto Calculator This free online keto calculator determines your ideal nutrient ratio for weight loss or maintenance during ketosis. The keto calculator recommends the optimum daily calories, fat, carb and protein amounts to help you get into ketosis – and meet your weight loss goal. How to Know You’re in Ketosis Keto Symptoms During keto, low carbers experience bursts of energy and heightened mood – just two of the big benefits of ketosis. Some dieters notice a temporary, sweet taste in the mouth or a mild, sweet b Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Your Complete Meal Plan And Supplement Guide

Ketogenic Diet: Your Complete Meal Plan And Supplement Guide

So you've heard the arguments, weighed out the challenges and benefits, and decided you're all in. You're going keto. First off, you're in good company. More people—and more athletes—than ever are embracing a very low-carb, high-fat diet and sticking with it for months, or even years, on end. Once they successfully make the switch from using carbohydrates to using fat and ketones for fuel, they find they're leaner, healthier, and more mentally focused than ever. But for every lifter who ends up loving this approach, you'll find another who had a miserable experience and bailed after just a few days. This is a shame, because they probably could have felt great if they had simply had a better plan—or a plan at all. I'm not here to sell you on nutritional ketosis or explain what it is or the big-picture benefits it can provide. That's the domain of other articles. With the help of Myoplex athlete and longtime keto-adapted athlete Jason Wittrock, I'm here to provide you with your best induction experience. Here's what you need to know to ace your nutrition and supplementation during the crucial first month of ketogenic dieting, along with a complete sample meal plan! Your Must-Have (And Must-Not-Have) Keto Food List Feeling ready to start buying groceries? Slow down there, chief. Go through the pantry, fridge, freezer, and secret stashes under the bed, and get rid of foods with any significant carb content. In the first few days, you could end up craving them—badly. Sorry, no fruit for now. Even carrots and onions are too high-glycemic to work with keto, Wittrock says. Got that done? Cool. Now, here are some of the staples you should build your ketogenic diet around: Fatty nuts and seeds: cashews, macadamia nuts, pumpkin seeds Avocado Whole eggs Full-fat cheese Beef Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Can Kickstart Weight Loss And Boost Brain Fitness

Ketogenic Diet Can Kickstart Weight Loss And Boost Brain Fitness

A ketogenic diet is an extreme nutritional intervention based on very low carbohydrate intake designed to mimic starvation and drive the body into ketosis, in which the body shifts from using glucose as its main fuel to using fat. While other low-carb diets like the Atkins and Paleo diets have also focused on carb restriction, the ketogenic diet is far more than the latest fad diet but rather one supported by strong research to improve health, energy, brain function, and weight loss. Although the ketogenic diet (KD) has been studied extensively for weight loss, promising research has shown a wide range of benefits in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's and Alzeheimer's disease. Promising research has shown that ketones may be neuroprotective, reducing the risk of cognitive decline while boosting memory, energy and mood. The KD provides antioxidant benefits that yield promise in treating cancer, and, in animal models, has been shown to confer longevity. The Science of the KD The goal of the ketogenic diet is to shift the body and brain to preferentially use ketone bodies formed by the mobilization of fat tissue as the fuel source instead of glucose. Ketone bodies such as acetoacetate and b-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) are formed by the body through ketogenesis and can be oxidized as a preferred energy source when energy is sparse as with fasting or high-intensity or prolonged endurance exercise. After three to four days of fasting, the mobilization of ketone bodies from fat stores produces the state of ketosis which can be a physiological response (with low glucose, low insulin) or can be pathological as in uncontrolled diabetes (with high glucose, low insulin). Ketogenesis is an evolutionary adaptation key to our survival in periods of famine to allow the body and brai Continue reading >>

Pretranslational Activation Of Cytochrome P450iie During Ketosis Induced By A High Fat Diet.

Pretranslational Activation Of Cytochrome P450iie During Ketosis Induced By A High Fat Diet.

Abstract Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450 (P450IIE) is reported to be induced by ketosis. In the present study, the effects of a high fat diet on P450IIE induction and the relationship between ketone body concentration and P450IIE induction were studied by the following: 1) measurement of the activity of aniline hydroxylase, 2) immunoblot analysis for P450IIE protein, and 3) Northern blot analysis for P450IIE mRNA. The enzyme activities (aniline hydroxylase) in hepatic and renal microsomes were elevated about 2-3-fold by feeding with a high fat diet for 3 days. The increases in enzyme activities were also accompanied by 3-fold increases in immunoreactive P450IIE protein and its mRNA. In contrast, no differences were observed for the catalytic activities of N-alkoxyresorufin dealkylases or the amounts of immunoreactive P450IA and P450IIC, indicating a specific induction of P450IIE by high fat feeding. Furthermore, the increases in the levels of P450IIE mRNA correlated positively (r = 0.73) with plasma concentrations of acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate but not with that of acetone, which induces P450IIE without changing its mRNA level. Our data thus indicated that P450IIE induction during the ketosis of a high fat feeding appears to be due to pretranslational activation and that is similar to the induction mechanism of fasted and diabetic animals. Continue reading >>

Foods For Induction Phase Of The Atkins Diet

Foods For Induction Phase Of The Atkins Diet

The first phase of the Atkins program, known as the induction phase, is designed to jumpstart your weight loss and boost your fat burning metabolism. You will cut back your carbohydrates to 20 grams per day and get most of your calories from fat and protein. Learn what food is allowed and what is restricted during this phase. Induction Phase of the Atkins Diet Induction is the strictest phase of the Atkins diet. This phase is meant to force the body to convert from using carbohydrates for energy to using fat. There is a list of acceptable foods that shouldn't be deviated from, but portions of most foods are unlimited. This is the phase of the most rapid weight loss. However, that loss won't come easy given the very limited foods available during this phase. Foods allowed include most proteins, vegetables, cheese, and fats and oils. For foods with carbohydrates, you will limit your total intake to 20 grams of net carbs. Protein Foods Most non-vegetable and non-dairy protein foods, such as meat, fish, seafood, and eggs, have little or no carbohydrates. You are allowed to eat them freely. There are just a few restrictions: Bacon, ham, and other cured meats are allowed as long as they are not processed with sugar. Nitrate-free cured meats are also preferred. There are some shellfish to limit, like mussels and oysters, which are a little higher in carbs. Imitation crab or imitation shellfish are prohibited. Vegetables The bulk of the carbohydrates in the Atkins diet comes from vegetables. It is important to know the carbohydrate counts of the vegetables you are eating. Twelve to 15 grams per day (not counting fiber) should come from vegetables. Vegetables that are not allowed in the Atkins induction phase include corn, potatoes, green (English) peas, and other sweet or starc Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

Escaping The Fat Trap

Escaping The Fat Trap

Once you’ve been heavy for some time, your high insulin levels can make it hard to succeed in losing weight. Trying diet after diet and failing on each and every one is depressing. But when you discover the perfectly natural bodily process called lipolysis, hope can replace despair. To a person longing to lose weight, Nirvana is the definition of lipolysis: the process of dissolving fat. When you burn fat, it breaks down into glycerol and other fatty acids. How does the process actually work? Are there any drawbacks? There are plenty of laypersons and even physicians who think there must be. Burning off one’s fat sounds like a faddish trick. These folks give a skeptical shrug and say, "I’m sure people lose some weight with the Atkins approach, but don’t they gain it right back again?" The interesting thing is that if you adhere to the four phases the Atkins approach—which includes finding your Atkins Carbohydrate Equilibrium (ACE), meaning the amount of carbohydrates you can still consume and neither gain nor lose weight—you won’t regain the weight. The phase known as Lifetime Maintenance, though more indulgent, evolves naturally from the three weight-loss phases, thereby gradually teaching you a permanent way of eating that still moderates carbohydrate intake to the degree that is necessary for your individual metabolism. Many controlled carbohydrate regimens have been proposed over the years. They work with some degree of effectiveness for some people. However, many of them do not bring carbohydrate intake down to a level that will permit lipolysis. For people who suffer from metabolic obesity and have great difficulty losing, that is a grave weakness. Atkins, on the other hand, starts you off consuming 20 grams of carbohydrates. You then proceed at your Continue reading >>

Prepartum Intake, Postpartum Induction Of Ketosis, And Periparturient Disorders Affect The Metabolic Status Of Dairy Cows

Prepartum Intake, Postpartum Induction Of Ketosis, And Periparturient Disorders Affect The Metabolic Status Of Dairy Cows

Abstract Nutritional management during the dry period may affect susceptibility of cows to metabolic and infectious diseases during the periparturient period. Thirty-five multiparous Holstein cows were used to determine the effect of prepartum intake, postpartum induction of ketosis, and periparturient disorders on metabolic status. Cows were fed a diet from dry-off to parturition at either ad libitum intake or restricted intake [RI; 80% of calculated net energy for lactation (NEL) requirement]. After parturition, all cows were fed a lactation diet. At 4 d in milk (DIM), cows underwent a physical examination and were classified as healthy or having at least one periparturient disorder (PD). Healthy cows were assigned to the control (n = 6) group or the ketosis induction (KI; n = 9) group. Cows with PD were assigned to the PD control (PDC; n = 17) group. Cows in the control and PDC groups were fed for ad libitum intake. Cows in the KI group were fed at 50% of their intake on 4 DIM from 5 to 14 DIM or until signs of clinical ketosis were observed; then, cows were returned to ad libitum intake. During the dry period, ad libitum cows ate more than RI cows; the difference in intake resulted in ad libitum cows that were in positive energy balance (142% of NEL requirement) and RI cows that were in negative energy balance (85% of NEL requirement). Prepartum intake resulted in changes in serum metabolites consistent with plane of nutrition and energy balance. Prepartum intake had no effect on postpartum intake, serum metabolites, or milk yield, but total lipid content of liver at 1 d postpartum was greater for ad libitum cows than for RI cows. The PD cows had lower intake and milk yield during the first 4 DIM than did healthy cows. During the ketosis induction period, KI cows ha Continue reading >>

A Guide To Ketosis

A Guide To Ketosis

Here is the guide to ketosis. The contents of this article can be located here. If you're currently wondering what on earth ketosis even is, then you're in luck for I plan not only to befuddle but also to enlighten. All you have to do is read on. I've personally had fantastic results on keto, and I really believe in the validity of this diet - not only in terms of fat-loss, but also in terms of health-gain. There is a lot of understandable skepticism and tons of misconceptions about keto; I want to let newcomers know, however surprising it may be, that keto (or at least a diet low in grains/sugars and high in fats) is a very healthy diet with numerous benefits. This guide is very long so I've partitioned this post into subsections. The links contained within the contents are 'clickable' and will transport you directly to that section. You can also right click and select "copy link address" of a particular section/section title, and you can either bookmark it so that you can return to a specific section easily or you can give the link to a friend if you want them to read a particular section. If you want to return to the contents of the page simply click on the 'upwards' arrows that are next to each of the section titles within the main article. Contents I. Why You Should Care About Ketosis: The Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet 1A. Ketosis Increases Neuronal Stabilization and Mental Focus 1B. Ketosis Promotes the Loss of Body-Fat and LDL Cholesterol 1C. Ketosis Eliminates Various Ailments such as Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension 1D. Ketosis Treats Several Diseases such as Alzheimer's and Various Cancers 1E. Ketosis Promotes Cardiovascular Health 1F. Ketosis Preserves Lean-Body Mass 1G. One Will Lose Body-fat More Quickly on Keto Than Not 1H. Ketosis Blunts Appetite and Incre Continue reading >>

Using The Fat Fasting Technique

Using The Fat Fasting Technique

The fat fast is a technique brought by Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution – used by people who are metabolically resistant and have trouble with their induction. Let me first say that fat fasting should be used in 2 situations and 2 situations only: Breaking through a 2 week or longer plateau. Inducing yourself into ketosis quicker, whether you are just starting keto or you had a cheat day. If you’re the type of person that loses weight easily and you are NOT hitting a plateau, then fat fasting should NOT be used. It can be potentially dangerous for someone that is not metabolically resistant, or for someone that is not on a plateau. You should not fat fast consistently. Like I said, it is only for people starting a ketogenic diet and want to be inducted into ketosis faster, or for people that are on a long (2 weeks or more) plateau. Understanding the Fat Fast The lack of carbohydrates and protein will allow your body to depreciate your glycogen stores quicker, also allowing your body to go after the fat stores, like we want it to, to use as fuel. Fat fasting will force the body to undergo lipolysis, so that it burns up fat that is stored in the body. Lipolysis is a process involved in the breakdown of fats, converting triglycerides into glycerol and free fatty acids. The longer you fast, the more of these free fatty acids will be released. Why is this important? Well fatty acids are used by the liver to create small amounts of ketone bodies, and used as fuel. Lipolysis cannot happen if there is a significant amount of glucose coming in, but since 80% – 90% of what you will be eating are fats, you don’t need to worry about excess protein or carbs converting into glucose. What the Fat Fast Is So, what exactly is a fat fast? It’s eating between 1000 and 1200 calo Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Ketosis Induction Phase Survival Guide

The Ultimate Ketosis Induction Phase Survival Guide

As someone who has gone through the ketosis induction phase many times now I felt like writing a ketosis induction phase survival guide, so to speak. I’m currently on day 5 of ketosis induction and want to share a day-by-day analysis of what to expect during keto-induction including hunger levels, energy levels, physical changes both internal and external and anything else you may find during your own induction phase. I’ll start with a little info on the keto-induction phase before moving into my daily expectations log and finally provide tips and suggestions on how to survive induction and speed up the induction process a little. What is ketosis induction? Ketosis induction (or keto-induction) is the process of your body moving from a glucose fueled metabolism to a ketone fueled metabolism. This means your body, once depleted of remaining glycogen stores, starts adapting itself to breaking down fat into ketones as an alternative fuel source to survive. It takes time for your body to adjust and become efficient at using its new fuel source. Once the induction phase completes, we call it being keto-adapted, meaning your body has now adapted to using fat as it’s primary fuel source. How long does keto-induction take? This varies from person to person and hence everyone’s experience, my own included, may differ greatly from another’s experience. The average time for keto-induction seems to be about 2 weeks according to most people’s experience but I have heard of it ranging from just a few days, up to 8 weeks. For me, it depends on how long I’ve been out of ketosis. If I’ve had a single day of carb bingeing I can get back into ketosis in a day or two. I didn’t watch my diet at all last month though and expect induction to be a full 2 weeks, which is about Continue reading >>

Atkins Induction: Minimize The Flu

Atkins Induction: Minimize The Flu

Atkins induction is the first phase of the Atkins diet, and it is often associated with the symptoms of adapting to a low carb diet. On the first two weeks of the Atkins diet, your carbohydrate intake drops to below 20 grams of net carbs per day. The goal of this low level of carb intake is to cause the body’s metabolism to switch from burning carbs (sugar) to burning body fat for fuel. During this phase, you can eat all kinds of fresh meats, leafy vegetables, and fats such as coconut oil, olive oil or butter. Some people call this phase "induction flu" because of the general flu-like symptoms which are common for those first starting the diet. Sufferers report being tired, achy, chilled and shaky, but the symptoms are temporary and clear up within a week. The reason for the adaptation period is that new cellular enzymes must be created to burn fat instead of glucose and this takes a few weeks or longer for some. The shaky, chilled symptoms are a side effect of reactive hypoglycemia, or a loss of minerals and an electrolyte imbalance due to the loss of water of that occurs when first starting a ketogenic diet plan. How to Minimize Atkins Induction Flu Induction flu can be minimized if you understand the reasons for low carb diet side effects and practice the tips offered to avoid most of the issues: Make sure you get plenty of water. Drink at least 64 ounces of pure water each day. Get plenty of salt as well. Drink broth, or put more salt on your food. (Check with your doctor if you are on a sodium restricted diet for heart or blood pressure problems.) Eat as much protein rich foods as you like. You should feel full but not stuffed. Don't skip meals, and don't go without eating for longer than 4-6 hours. Take a 250-400 mg magnesium citrate supplement. (talk with your Continue reading >>

7 Tips To Get Into Ketosis

7 Tips To Get Into Ketosis

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process that provides several health benefits. During ketosis, your body converts fat into compounds known as ketones and begins using them as its main source of energy. Studies have found that diets that promote ketosis are highly beneficial for weight loss, due in part to their appetite-suppressing effects (1, 2). Emerging research suggests that ketosis may also be helpful for type 2 diabetes and neurological disorders, among other conditions (3, 4). That being said, achieving a state of ketosis can take some work and planning. It's not just as simple as cutting carbs. Here are 7 effective tips to get into ketosis. Eating a very low-carb diet is by far the most important factor in achieving ketosis. Normally, your cells use glucose, or sugar, as their main source of fuel. However, most of your cells can also use other fuel sources. This includes fatty acids, as well as ketones, which are also known as ketone bodies. Your body stores glucose in your liver and muscles in the form of glycogen. When carb intake is very low, glycogen stores are reduced and levels of the hormone insulin decline. This allows fatty acids to be released from fat stores in your body. Your liver converts some of these fatty acids into the ketone bodies acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. These ketones can be used as fuel by portions of the brain (5, 6). The level of carb restriction needed to induce ketosis is somewhat individualized. Some people need to limit net carbs (total carbs minus fiber) to 20 grams per day, while others can achieve ketosis while eating twice this amount or more. For this reason, the Atkins diet specifies that carbs be restricted to 20 or fewer grams per day for two weeks to guarantee that ketosis is achieved. After this point, s Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

8 Ways To Blast Through Low-carb Flu And Dive Into Ketosis

Have you just started a low-carb diet? Do you find yourself feeling exhausted and overcome by tiredness? Perhaps you are thinking that going low-carb wasn’t a good idea after all… You might already know that these symptoms are not uncommon, especially if you are doing low-carb for the first time. Also known as “low carb flu” or “Atkins flu”, this phase is completely normal – although by no means pleasant. This condition occurs when you cut your carb intake sharply, to about 20-30g a day, in order to induce ketosis. What is low-carb flu? Your body is used to running on carbs. It’s been operating this way for decades. Cutting carbs in favour of fat is a huge change for your metabolism. Your body needs some time to adjust to this change. This period of adjustment can sometimes cause flu-like symptoms. Fatigue is the most common one, but you could also get muscle cramps, headaches, dizziness and mental fog. Some of these symptoms are markers of sugar withdrawal. Sugar addiction is real and common, so trying to break away can be difficult. Low-carb flu is not actual flu Please note that “low carb flu” does not include fever or respiratory cold-like symptoms such as coughing or sneezing. If you are experiencing any of these, it means that you might have actually caught an infection! So it would be a good idea to postpone starting your diet until you are all clear. How can you fight tiredness and other symptoms of low-carb flu? First of all, remember that it won’t last forever. Low-carb flu usually lasts around 3-5 days (although could be 1-2 weeks for some unlucky people with high metabolic resistance). Here are some simple tips on making this transition easier. 1) Eat more fat Fat is the key to this whole issue. You must eat lots of it – a lot more th Continue reading >>

More in ketosis