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Ketosis How To Tell

The Signs Of Ketosis On Atkins Diets

The Signs Of Ketosis On Atkins Diets

The Atkins diet, first published in 1972 and reinvented 20 years later, has helped countless people lose weight, but isn't without controversy. The diet severely limits your intake of carbohydrates -- found in sugar, bread, pasta, most fruits, starchy vegetables and many processed snacks -- to encourage your body to lose fat. Often, this pushes you into a state of ketosis, a process that occurs when you burn fat for fuel. Video of the Day Ketosis isn't inherently harmful, but in some cases can lead to a build up of the ketone bodies, causing dehydration and changes in your blood chemistry. Though a blood test is the most accurate way to determine if you're in ketosis, certain other physical changes provide clues that you're in this state. Ketosis and the Atkins Diet Your body usually uses glucose, derived from carbohydrates, for energy -- particularly to fuel the brain. Ketones are produced when you're short on carbohydrates and must burn fat for fuel. When you produce ketones for energy, you are in ketosis. Phase One, or the "Induction Phase," of Atkins will likely cause you to produce ketones. During these first two weeks, you consume no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. This represents a significant restriction in carbohydrates -- the Institute of Medicine recommends you eat 45 to 65 percent of your daily calories from carbs, or 225 to 325 grams daily on a standard 2,000-calorie diet. To meet your low-carb limit, the Atkins diet has you subsist primarily on meats, fish, poultry, eggs, oils, some cheese and watery, fibrous vegetables with few carbohydrates, such as lettuce and cucumbers. Breath and Urine Signs of Ketosis Ketones are burned for energy, but also breathed out through the lungs and excreted in the urine. As a result, your breath takes on a frui Continue reading >>

When Do I Know If I’m In Ketosis?

When Do I Know If I’m In Ketosis?

Those on a Keto diet eat foods high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbs in order to get the process of Ketosis to kick into place. When Do I Know If I’m In Ketosis? Ketosis occurs when you stop burning carbs as fuel and you start burning ‘ketones’. Click here to read more about the process Ketosis. One of the major benefits of ketosis is that is helps us to burn fat and therefore lose weight. Unfortunately there is no red light which flashes to tell us that are our bodies are in Ketosis (wouldn’t this be handy). There are kits which you can supposedly purchase in the chemist which indicate if your body is in Ketosis, but how reliable these are I am not sure. The natural way to test is to look out for signs and symptoms which can give us clues: Bad Breath Acetone, a ketone that is found in our urine and breath is more prevalent on the Ketone Diet because the levels of it in our bodies are higher. It can be unpleasant and leave a nasty taste in your mouth which some describe to be fruity or a metal-like taste. Strong Smelling Urine Again, because the levels of acetone in your body are increased as above, it is likely that you will notice in increase in the smell of your urine. It can appear to be more pungent than normal. Decrease in Appetite When in Ketosis, it isn’t uncommon to feel less hungry than normal. The scientific reasons behind this are unknown, but it could be due to the increase in protein and fibers from the vegetables that you may be eating. The body’s hormone levels are also likely to undergo a change whilst on this diet as your body can better regulate your hormones which tell your body when you’re hungry. When you over eat and fill up on carbs, your brain ignores the hormone which is often why you feel like your stomach is an empty Continue reading >>

A Detailed Guide On How To Test Your Ketone Levels

A Detailed Guide On How To Test Your Ketone Levels

I have to be honest with you. I’ve been making some critical mistakes. I was assuming that I was in ketosis for months but I’m now finding out that isn’t the case. Not even close. I’ve finally hunkered down and have been measuring my ketones the right way and the results have been pretty surprising. I was eating too much protein, and too little fat. I was eating too frequently. I was eating too few calories. I never would have known this without testing. Time for you to learn from the mistakes I made and test the right way. Ketosis can be a powerful nutrition approach to use switch your metabolism to prioritize for fat loss, mental output, physical performance, and much more. The main problem? Many people just assume that if they are “low carb” they are in ketosis, but think again. How do you know if you’re actually in ketosis? As I love to say, “test, don’t guess” when it comes to your health. (Still trying to get “track, don’t slack” to catch on…) I’ll outline in this article the three ways to test your ketone levels and which you should be doing when. HOW TO TEST YOUR KETONE LEVELS: THREE DIFFERENT WAYS There are three testing methods because there are three forms of ketones in your body: acetate, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutryate. Each of these ketone bodies do slightly different things and are in different forms, so they can be tested individually with different methods. The three different area these ketones exist in your body are your breath, urine or blood. The good news is that all of these ketone level measurements can be done at home, by yourself. You don’t need to go to a lab or use any fancy high-tech gadgetry. Tracking consistently, at least when you’re getting used to a ketogenic diet, is important so you know how mu Continue reading >>

7 Mistakes Keto Dieters Make: A Doctor Explains

7 Mistakes Keto Dieters Make: A Doctor Explains

"I was feeling great and doing fantastic when bam, I hit a roadblock I couldn’t overcome," my 43-year-old patient Aimee told me a few months after her initial visit. "Despite massive effort to remain in ketosis and mix up my workouts, the scale wouldn’t budge and my skinny jeans are a little less skinny." As an obstetrician-gynecologist, I frequently find that a ketogenic diet helps my patients lose weight, reduce or eliminate menopausal symptoms, regain sex drive, and so much more. Like Aimee, many patients do beautifully on a keto diet—especially as a keto-alkaline diet—for a while, but then an inevitable plateau occurs. I understand how frustrating those plateaus (which can occur on any diet) can become. Occasionally, frustrated patients consider abandoning their plan when roadblocks hit. I encourage them to stay the course; one study found a long-term ketogenic diet was safe, maintainable, side effects free, and significantly reduced weight while improving health measures like lipid levels. At the same time, you want to do everything possible to break that plateau, so here are the top seven mistakes I see my patients make and how to fix them: You know too many carbs can knock you out of ketosis, but so can too much protein. Protein gets a health halo in the diet world, but on a ketogenic diet too much can prevent your body from getting and staying in ketosis. You needn’t become militant, but aim for moderate protein intake (about 20 percent of your diet) and get about 70 to 80 percent of your diet from healthy fats. When you go on a ketogenic diet, your body can become more acidic, creating chronic inflammation that can stall fat loss. Getting alkaline a week before going keto stacks the fat-loss and health benefits in your favor. Toxins congregate in fat, Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Generally, ketone concentrations are lower in the morning and higher in the evening. Whatever time you pick to measure ketone levels, make sure to keep it consistent. Also, do not measure your ketone levels right after exercise. Ketone levels tend to be lower while your glucose levels higher so you won't get representative numbers. Keep in mind there are daily fluctuations caused by changes in hormone levels. Don't get discouraged! Another aspect that affects the level of ketones is the amount of fat in your diet. Some of you may show higher concentration of ketones after a high-fat meal. Coconut oil contains MCTs that will help you boost ketones. To easily increase your fat intake on a ketogenic diet, try fat bombs - snacks with at least 80% fat content. Ketone levels tend to be higher after extensive aerobic exercise as your body depletes glycogen stores. Exercise may help you get into ketosis faster. ketogenic "fruity" breath is not pleasant for most people. To avoid this, drink a lot of water, mint tea and make sure you eat foods rich in electrolytes. Avoid too many chewing gums and mints, as it may put you out of ketosis; there may be hidden carbs affecting your blood sugar. Increase your electrolyte intake, especially potassium. You are likely going to lose some sodium and potassium when switching to the keto diet. Finally, if you find it hard to lose weight on a ketogenic diet, there may be plenty other reasons than the level of ketone bodies: Not Losing Weight on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up and Read Further. Continue reading >>

How To Tell If You’re In Ketosis With Strips

How To Tell If You’re In Ketosis With Strips

During the process of becoming keto-adapted, your body is re-learning how to manufacture and use ketones as a source of energy instead of sugars or carbs. One of the simplest methods of testing whether your body is producing ketones is to use ketosis strips. Ketostix are the most popular available. The process is pretty simple, you take a strip and either hold it in your urine stream or alternatively, wee into a cup and dip the stick in there. Then you compare the colour of the strip to the chart on the bottle. It’s important to compare the colour at the right time – typically 15 seconds after you have dipped it in your urine. The most widely regarded standard figures for being in ketosis are if you measure between 0.5 – 3.0mmol of ketones. Here’s the thing, though… It’s important to remember that these strips simply tell you whether or not you are excreting ketones. And just because you are excreting ketones does not tell you that your body is using them (i.e. keto-adapted). And, also if you are showing no ketones, that does not mean your body is not producing them. A highly keto-adapted person will excrete less ketones because their body is using them all. I know this may be a bit confusing, because then what’s the point of these strips, right? So When are Ketone Strips Useful? Essentially, Ketostix are useful when you are just starting out. When you are switching from eating a diet high in carbs to a ketogenic diet you can use these sticks to let you know that your body has started to produce ketones. This tells you that you are on the right track because stage one is that you start producing ketones! So I would suggest that they can be useful in your first month. After that, as you become more keto-adapted, the reading becomes less and less reliable to Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Are In Ketosis

7 Signs You Are In Ketosis

The Ketogenic Diet (also known as “keto”) has been all over social media. You’ve probably seen ripped fitness models claiming that Keto gave them their physique, and the even more inspiration stories of normal people like you and me, who lost weight and reclaimed their lives through this diet called Keto. If you’re not sure what the Ketogenic Diet is, head on over to What is a Keto Diet? (Ketogenic Diet 101). Over there I’ve detailed what exactly Keto is and isn’t, given you meal plans, snacks, and answered all of your questions about the diet. But let’s say you’ve jumped into Keto with both feet, and now you want to know “Is this working?” I don’t blame you. It can be hard to tell what’s going on inside your body. Are you in Ketosis? Are you eating few enough carbs? Are you shedding fat? Well, there are 7 obvious ways to tell if you’re in ketosis, without testing your blood or urine. Here are the signs you’re in Ketosis: 1. Weight Loss Weight loss is the first and most obvious sign that you’re in ketosis. The weight loss happens for a variety of reasons, but it’s important to note that it’s very fast in the beginning. This is because when you switch to a low-carb diet, your muscles start losing water. Carbohydrates are what bind water to your muscles, so when you’re not eating carbohydrates, your muscles start dumping them, and the attached water. That’s one of the things that causes Keto Flu (which you can read about in Keto 101), but drinking plenty of water and keeping your salt intake up will keep you hydrated and feeling healthy. After the initial water leaving your body, then you’ll start to see steady fat loss. Related Reading: My 60 Day Keto Challenge Results (I lost 23 pounds!) 2. Little or No Appetite When you stop eati Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Recently I had a client tell me that she and her husband were eating more than 2 pounds of bacon a week—usually three strips for breakfast and one or two with a salad for dinner. I’ve been a dietitian for almost 20 years. Few things surprise me. But I had to ask: “Why?” She told me that her husband had heard about a new diet on TV, the keto diet, and they decided to try it. Six months and countless packages of bacon later, her husband had lost 20 pounds and said he felt more energetic. I’m beginning to hear more and more people lecture me about the benefits of the ketogenic diet. “Keto burns fat fast! It turbo-charges your energy! It fights disease! You can eat all the bacon you want!” But as is so often the case with diets, underneath all the initial excitement, there’s a gut check. Here’s everything you should know about the ketogenic diet and whether or not you should try it for yourself. Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so your brain signals it to tap its reserve of ketones. It’s like a hybrid car that runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity. Okay, but what are ketones? They’re compounds created by your liver from your fat stores when blood insulin is low. “Your liver produces ketones all the time, but the rate depends on carbohydrate and protein intake,” says Jeff Volek, Ph.D., R.D., a professor of human sciences at Ohio State University. Eat a normal amount of carbs and protein, and ketogenesis idles. Cut carbs and protein back, and you push to half throttle. This takes about three days to induce. A ketogenic diet requires that fat comprise 60 to 80 percent of your total calo Continue reading >>

How To Know If You Are In Ketosis Without Strips.

How To Know If You Are In Ketosis Without Strips.

To know whether or not you’ve entered ketosis you can measure your blood ketone levels. But how to know if you are in ketosis without strips? Well, we’re already mildly ketogenic after an overnight fast. Once our liver glycogen stores have been depleted we begin to produce ketone bodies at an exponential rate. Despite that, it doesn’t mean that we’ll be utilizing them efficiently. If we’re not adapted, then our brain and muscles won’t be able to put those ketones into use. Nutritional ketosis begins if our blood ketone levels are over 0.5mMol. To indicate that, you can use either urine strips like Ketostix. There are also breath takers. The most optimal range for ketosis is between 0.5 and 3 mMol. Ketoacidosis occurs over 10mMol, which is quite hard to reach. It usually happens with people who are diabetic or after excessive alcohol consumption. But there are a few problems with measuring ketones. Having elevated levels of ketones doesn’t mean you’re in ketosis. These urine strips are expensive and taking several measurements a day is very costly. That’s why there’s another way how to know you’re in ketosis without strips. Like said, elevated ketone levels doesn’t necessarily mean ketosis. It might even be the opposite. If we’re not putting ketones into use, then we’re probably urinating it out. That’s why urine strips are not ideal. What we want to know as well is our blood sugar levels. Glucose and ketones are contradicting fuel sources. If one is elevated, then the other has to be decreased. If we have high blood sugar levels, then we won’t be able to use fat for fuel. We definitely won’t be in ketosis. Quantifying is great because it gives us an accurate interpretation of our condition. However, we shouldn’t get stuck with the dat Continue reading >>

How To Tell When You’re In Ketosis

How To Tell When You’re In Ketosis

We’re talking about ketosis. In the first part of this series, you learned about the science behind ketosis. In this second installation of The Story of Ketosis mini-series, you will learn how to spot the signs that your body has [finally] entered the fat-burning state of ketosis. Five Easy Ways to Tell When You’re in Ketosis 1. Your breath smells weird. One of the first changes you will notice once you are in ketosis will be in the way your breath smells and the way your tongue feels. You mouth may feel dry, or feel as if you haven’t eaten. Don’t worry. That’s normal. It is often the case that when you are in ketosis, your breath will smell a little like acetone, which is one of the three compounds that makes up the ketones your body is burning for fuel. This is all good news. Bad breath is a telltale sign you’re in ketosis. So, keep mints handy if you have client-facing responsibilities at work. 2. You lost weight or your belly is flatter. A more favorable sign of being in ketosis will be noticeable fat loss around your midsection. Your belly may look flatter. Your pants may feel a little looser. Once your body stops relying on glucose for fuel, the body stops storing fat and starts burning the fat you have. 3. You’re not eating as much as you used to eat You may have cravings, but you won’t be hungry. Here’s the answer to the riddle of why you always seemed like you needed to eat pre-keto: Eating simple carbs and sugars spikes your insulin levels. When insulin levels spike, the body knows it needs to synthesize the sugar that’s present in the blood, so it turns off ketosis. Your body always wants to protect your fat stores so you survive during times when food is scarce. The more carbs you eat, the more fuel your body can use without ever having t Continue reading >>

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

Five people have recently told me they were going to “try keto”—the most recent after gushing about a mutual friend who has been doing keto, aka the popular ketogenic diet, and getting awesome-looking results. You’ve probably heard rumblings about keto, but what the heck is it? And is it too good to be true? Let’s first get you caught up on all the hubbub around the ketogenic diet. Keto is an extremely low-carb, moderate-protein, and high-fat diet. You’ll find those on keto gobbling up stuff like fat slabs of bacon, mountains of avocados, and cartons of heavy whipping cream. There’s a lot of enthusiastic fanfare around it, like this comment on Reddit: Awesome. And then there’s this one: Low-carb diets are nothing new for weight loss. And keto is kind of a low-carb diet with a twist in that you emphasize tons of fat. I spoke to Leigh Peele, NASM certified personal trainer who fields questions on all matters of weight loss, metabolism, and nutrition, and is author of Starve Mode; and she told me that the original definition of keto is a 4:1 ratio of fats to carbohydrates or protein. That is, for every gram of protein or carb you eat, you would also eat four grams of fat (hence, the avocados and heavy whipping cream). But you don’t have to stick to that exactly as long as your carbs are low and protein moderate enough to properly be “ketogenic.” Let me explain. Differences Between Keto and a Low-Carb Diet Keto’s trump card against the average low-carb diet is that, after consistently depriving yourself of bread, pasta, donuts, and any carb source, your body goes into ketosis (between a couple of days and a week). Ketosis means your body is breaking down fat and releasing large quantities of molecules called ketones into your bloodstream. Your body t Continue reading >>

5 Signs You Are Fat Adapted

5 Signs You Are Fat Adapted

“Fat-adaptation” is a somewhat vague term describing the profound changes that happen after switching from a standard diet to a ketogenic one. In order to experience these changes, you need to commit to consuming a very limited amount of carbohydrates (20-25 g per day or less) and to stick to that limit at least for a couple of weeks, while at the same time eating sufficient fat and protein. Once you commit to this way of eating you’ll notice some subtle, yet amazing transformations that your body will go through, in addition to the stable weight loss. If you are just starting out on this diet and this is your first week, you might also want to check these signs that you are in ketosis. In this article, we’ll shed some light on the different signs that you will notice once you start getting fat-adapted, and explain each one of them in detail. #1. Improved energy In the initial phase of the ketogenic diet (also sometimes referred to as induction phase), your body will be learning how to use fat for fuel instead of glucose. While at first, this might make you feel tired and lethargic, this will only last until your body adapts to the changes in your diet. Once you switch to a fat-burning metabolism and your body adjusts to it, you’ll experience blood sugar levels that are lower and more balanced, and, as a consequence, your energy levels will remain stable through the day. As a result, a lot of people report an increased motivation to exercise and be more physically active, which, in turn, is an excellent addition to your weight-loss arsenal. #2. Better sleep While you might struggle with some insomnia at first, this will improve with time and you might find that you sleep much better compared to before starting the keto diet. Many people experience a deeper, ca Continue reading >>

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

The 4 Ketosis Symptoms You Should Be Looking For

Ketosis is the condition in which your body begins burning fat instead of carbs for its energy source. The benefits of ketosis range widely, but some of the best include: fat loss increased endurance less cravings shredded physique neurological optimization But how do you know when you’re in ketosis? Are there symptoms that you’re in ketosis? Is there a way to “feel” like you’re in ketosis? Obviously the best way to see if you’re in ketosis is to test you breath, blood, or urine. However, we’ve constructed the following list to help you detect the signs that you’ve transitioned into ketosis and turned your body into a fat burning machine! If you’ve been on the Ketogenic Diet for at least a week, run through this list of ketosis symptoms, and see if they fit what you’re experiencing! 1. Ketosis Breath A popular report from many low-carb and keto dieters is that their breath is less than desirable. The smell has been compared to fingernail polish remover, which is believed to come from the presence of acetone. Acetone is, of course, a ketone body, and is also found in many brands of nail-polish remover. 2. Keto Flu After a life full of ingesting large portions of carbs for energy, dropping carbs and moving into ketosis can often result in ketosis symptoms known collectively as the “keto flu.” It’s not unheard to feel light-headed, fatigued, or anemic when your body runs out of carb stores and begins turning to fat for its fuel source. You might feel irritable, or short-tempered; this is your body’s natural reaction to having sugar removed. Much like an addict in rehab, when you cut out mass amounts of processed sugars, you turn into a bit of a monster. Ketosis symptoms also include nausea, or stomach aches. These can be caused by your stomach r Continue reading >>

How Do I Know If I’m In Ketosis?

How Do I Know If I’m In Ketosis?

A simple urine test, 30 minutes after taking your Keto-OS, will show the elevated ketone levels in the body. You can also take a blood test using a glucometer with ketone strips for the most accurate reading of ketones in your blood. Here is how you can do a simple test: www.justpruvit.com/59-minute-test Continue reading >>

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