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Ketosis Fever

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

What is the ketogenic diet? The "classic" ketogenic diet is a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy. It is prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. It is usually used in children with seizures that do not respond to medications. It is stricter than the modified Atkins diet, requiring careful measurements of calories, fluids, and proteins. Foods are weighed and measured. The name ketogenic means that it produces ketones in the body. (keto = ketone; genic = producing) Ketones are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Usually the body uses carbohydrates (such as sugar, bread, pasta) for its fuel. Because the ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates, fats become the primary fuel instead. The body can work very well on ketones (and fats). Ketones are not dangerous. They can be detected in the urine, blood, and breath. Ketones are one of the more likely mechanisms of action of the diet, with higher ketone levels often leading to improved seizure control. However, there are many other theories for why the diet will work. Who will it help? Doctors usually recommend the ketogenic diet for children whose seizures have not responded to several different seizure medicines. The classic diet is usually not recommended for adults, mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow. However, the modified Atkins diet does work well. This also should be done with a good team of adult neurologists and dietitians. The ketogenic diet has been shown in many studies to be particularly helpful for some epilepsy conditions. These include infantile spasms, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, and GLUT-1 deficiency. Using a formula-only Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

Effects Of Milk Fever, Ketosis, And Lameness On Milk Yield In Dairy Cows.

Effects Of Milk Fever, Ketosis, And Lameness On Milk Yield In Dairy Cows.

Abstract The effects of milk fever, ketosis, and lameness were studied using data from 23,416 Finnish Ayrshire cows that calved in 1993 and were followed for one lactation (i.e., until culling or the next calving). Monthly test day milk yields were treated as repeated measurements within a cow in a mixed model analysis. Disease index variables were created to relate the timing of a disease to the measures of test day milk. Statistical models for each parity and disease included fixed effects of calving season, stage of lactation, and disease index. An autoregressive correlation structure was used to model the association among the repeated measurements. The milk yield of cows contracting milk fever was affected for a period of 4 to 6 wk after calving; the loss ranged from 1.1 to 2.9 kg/d, depending on parity and the time elapsed after milk fever diagnosis. Despite the loss, cows with milk fever produced 1.1 to 1.7 kg more milk/d than did healthy cows. Milk yield started to decline 2 to 4 wk before the diagnosis of ketosis and continued to decline for a varying time period after it. The daily milk loss was greatest within the 2 wk after the diagnosis, varying from 3.0 to 5.3 kg/d, depending on parity. Cows in parity 4 or higher were most severely affected by ketosis; the average total loss per cow was 353.4 kg. Lameness also affected milk yield; milk loss of cows diagnosed with foot and leg disorders varied between 1.5 and 2.8 kg/d during the first 2 wk after the diagnosis. Continue reading >>

Do You Get Really Warm When Vlc Or Zc And Are In Ketosis?

Do You Get Really Warm When Vlc Or Zc And Are In Ketosis?

I've been doing VLC for weight loss for some time now, using ketostix to check that I'm staying in ketosis. I've noticed that every evening, several hours after my last meal (and food intake for the day), I get very warm, even rosy-cheeked and almost like a moderate fever. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 Could it be related to the ketosis? Does anybody else have this happen when eating minimal carbs? Is it a function of my body burning pure fat? (Oh, please say yes on that one!) Continue reading >>

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Keto Flu: Symptoms And Relief

Many people (not everyone!) who start a low carb diet experience what’s called the “keto flu” or the “induction flu” in the first few days while the body is adapting to burning ketones instead of glucose. What is keto flu? The basic symptoms are: headaches nausea upset stomach Lack of mental clarity (brain fog) sleepiness fatigue It’s called the “keto flu” for a reason: you feel sick. I’ve gone through it, and it wasn’t a pleasant experience. Fortunately, it only lasted four days (2 of them were pretty bad) but then suddenly I woke up feeling much better, less hungry and my energy level was high and consistent throughout the day! While at one point (or three or four) I thought to myself: “what the serious F am I doing? I’m going to die!” but I plowed through it, and when it was over I didn’t regret a thing because what I gained mentally and physically was 100% worth it. Keto and autoimmune disorders I have an autoimmune disease called Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Fibromyalgia to top it off. So, I’m no stranger to brain fog and fatigue, but the fatigue and brain fog that comes with keto flu is a little different, and feel much more like having the regular flu. How long will the keto flu last? It depends. Some people don’t experience any symptoms at all, but some suffer anywhere from a day to a week. In rare cases up to 15 days. Everybody’s bodies are different, and some people handle switching over better than others. You might consider starting keto on the weekend or sometime when you’re able to get good rest deal with the symptoms. For those of you that are going through the keto flu, don’t give up! I know you feel like it’s never going to get better but stick with it and you´ll be so happy you did! I’m telling you, waking up r Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Does Ketosis Cause An Internal Rise In Body Temperature?

Ooh, ooh, ooh, I feel my temperature rising Help me, I’m flaming I must be a hundred and nine Burning, burning, burning And nothing can cool me I just might turn into smoke But I feel fine –Elvis Presley singing “Burning Love” Somebody’s turned up the heat up in here and it’s gotta be that low-carb diet I’m on, right? That’s what everybody does with livin’ la vida low-carb when something new happens to them after starting this way of eating–they blame it on low-carb! I mocked this notion in this blog post about an earache a couple of years ago, but what if there is merit to some rather strange side effects of following a controlled-carbohydrate nutritional approach? Hmmmmmm. There are several things we KNOW will happen to most people when they begin the low-carb lifestyle: their HDL “good” cholesterol goes up, there is a marked improvement in mental health, for women it helps with reproductive health, blood sugar levels are stabilized, they end up having less acne, triglycerides plummet (a VERY good thing!), and so much more I could spend hours sharing with you about. But there are some things that can vary from person to person as one of my readers shared with me in a recent e-mail. This 43-year old man starting cutting his carbohydrate intake beginning in January 2008 and has lost over 25 pounds so far. WOO HOO! He has really enjoyed this new low-carb lifestyle change, but was curious about an unexpected side effect that has been plaguing him with no apparent cause. Here’s what he wrote: Hey Jimmy, After lots of searches, I’m having trouble finding out if anyone experiences a sensation of a rise in body temperature while in ketosis. There are some days I feel like I am literally burning up (but I don’t have a fever or anything). Coinciden Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

Ketosis Symptoms & Low Carb Flu Explained

What does Ketosis mean exactly, and what are Ketosis symptoms? There are a lot of questions about the Low Carb Flu, also known as “Induction Flu” (based on the Atkins Induction Phase). If you’ve just started eating low carb and you feel miserable, you’re experiencing the low carb flu. Ketosis symptoms include: Headaches, bad breath or a metallic taste in your mouth, irritability (like PMS on steroids! lol), leg cramps, insomnia, nausea, etc. It basically feels like you’ve been hit with a nasty flu. Symptoms vary from person to person. The good news is, it means you’re doing it right! The even better news is… it only lasts a few days. What Is Ketosis? It is a state in which your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs/sugar. A keto state means you are fueling your body on healthy fats instead of carbohydrates. So that saying that “You need carbs for energy!” is untrue. But you DO need either carbohydrates OR healthy fats for energy, which is why you can’t (or shouldn’t) eat “low carb, low fat”. See Low Carb, High Fat Diet Explained Your body and your brain actually operate much better on healthy fats. A ketogenic diet is known to reduce seizures, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, control diabetes and chronic pain issues (fibromyalgia, arthritis, etc) and remedy many other common health issues. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fuelling brain function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pas Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Toxemia

Pregnancy Toxemia

Before kidding it is called Pregnancy Toxemia. After kidding it is called Ketosis. Pregnancy Toxemia/Ketosis is caused by a build up of excess ketones in the blood (urine & milk), due to the incomplete metabolic breakdown of body fat. It occurs in a doe (before or after kidding) because of an inability to consume enough feed to meet her needs. Ketosis can be caused by either too much, or too little grain, or the wrong type of grain and also poor quality hay/forage. Before kidding, internal body fat plus large fetuses prevent the goat from taking in enough calories to support both the doe and fetuses. Because there is an urgent need for calories, the doe's body starts breaking down her body's fat reserves. But this method of metabolism is incomplete, and thus leaves ketones behind. Pregnancy Toxemia usually occurs within the last six weeks of the doe's pregnancy and is usually attributable either to underfeeding (starvation toxemia) or overfeeding grain. We also believe that increased outside stress during the final weeks of pregnancy, in conjunction with large, multiple kids can contribute to the occurrence of Pregnancy Toxemia. After kidding Ketosis results from the doe producing higher milk yields than her body can keep up with. Usually she is not being fed enough to keep up with her milk production. Signs: The doe eats less or stops eating completely. Depression Seperation from the herd The doe may be slow to get up or may lie off in a corner. Her eyes are dull. Somestimes blindness Muscle tremors & seizures Staggering Head pressing She may have swollen ankles She may grind her teeth. The doe may breathe more rapidly. The doe's breath and urine may have a fruity sweet odor. This is due to the excess ketones, which have a sweet smell. Prevention: Prevent excess body f Continue reading >>

Prevent Milk Fever, Ketosis In Cows

Prevent Milk Fever, Ketosis In Cows

NAIROBI: A significant number of farmers has incurred huge losses from treatments, loss of milk and even death of high yielding cows from milk fever and Ketosis. This has created fear of keeping high producing cows. This disease is our focus today: Milk Fever (Hypocalcaemia): Milk Fever (Hypocalcaemia) refers to life threateningly low levels of calcium in the cow’s blood. It can occur 24 hours before calving but mostly within 48 to 72 hours after calving, mostly in high yielding cows. Older cows are more susceptible because they produce more milk. This is because milk contains a lot of calcium (about 1.220 g per kg). If the cow produces 20 kg of milk in one day it will suddenly require to put about 24gm of calcium into all of this milk. If the calcium from the diet and that being mobilised from the bones is not enough for transfer to the milk this will result in a severe drop of calcium in the blood leading to hypocalcaemia. Milk fever is also associated with cows that are too fat at calving. ​ Milk fever or low calcium in the blood (hypocalcaemia) manifests as tremors and unsteadiness. Eventually the cow sits down with a kink in the neck and is unable to rise. It will become constipated and die if not treated. You can avoid this easily by ensuring a low calcium diet of less than 15 gm per day for the last 10 days before calving when the cow is dry to stimulate the body system to mobilise calcium from the bone stores; this is to ensure that the cow will continue to mobilise the same when it starts producing large amounts of milk during the first few days after calving. After calving, the cow should receive enough calcium in the diet as recommended for the animal depending on its size and the amount it is producing. There is another mineral namely phosphorous associa Continue reading >>

Mastitis, Ketosis, And Milk Fever In 31 Organic And 93 Conventional Norwegian Dairy Herds.

Mastitis, Ketosis, And Milk Fever In 31 Organic And 93 Conventional Norwegian Dairy Herds.

Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate differences in disease incidence between organic and conventional herds. The study was based on data from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording, which includes the Norwegian Cattle Health Recording System. All herds certified for organic farming in 1994 with a herd size of more than five cow-years were included. Conventional herds were matched on size and region, and from these, three herds were randomly selected for each organic herd. This resulted in a study group of 31 organic and 93 conventional herds with data from 1994 through 1997. The study unit was the cow within a lactation. Factors influencing disease incidence were studied by means of a generalized linear model approach. Management system had a highly significant effect on disease incidence. Odds ratios for organic compared with conventional herds were as follows: mastitis, 0.38; ketosis, 0.33; and milk fever, 0.60. Other significant factors that emerged in modeling the three diseases were year and lactation category for mastitis; lactation category, maximum milk yield, and season for ketosis; and lactation category and milk yield for milk fever. There was no marked difference in milk somatic cell count (SCC) between organic and conventional herds. However, cows in organic herds had lower SCC in lactation two and greater counts in lactations six and higher. Continue reading >>

Cattle Diseases

Cattle Diseases

Ketosis Also known as: Acetonemia, Fat Cow Syndrome, Hypoglycemia and Pregnancy Toxemia. Primary ketosis, or acetonemia, is a metabolic disorder and is largely a disease that is influenced by management of dairy cows in early lactation. Ketosis is an important clinical and subclinical disease, as there are several metabolic disorders and diseases that commonly occur in the calving and the early lactation period that are linked to ketosis (including milk fever, retained foetal membranes and displaced abomasum). Hypoglycemia is the major factor involved in the onset and development of clinical ketosis. There is a gradual loss of body condition over several days or even weeks. There is also a moderate to marked decline in milk yield (up to 5 liters per day) over five to six days before the onset of obvious clinical signs (Edwards and Tozer, 2004). This can persist for up to two weeks after diagnosis (Rajala-Schultz et al., 1999). The disease is most commonly seen in high-yielding dairy cows in early lactation. Secondary ketosis due to lack of appetite as a result of another disease can be seen at any stage of lactation. Beef cows may also suffer from ketosis during pregnancy, although this is less commonly recognized. Primary ketosis in dairy cows To satisfy the requirements of milk production, the cow can draw on two sources of nutrients – feed intake and body reserves. During early lactation, the energy intake is insufficient to meet the energy output in milk and the animal is in a negative energy balance. In conventional farming, this is considered to be a normal metabolic situation in high-yielding dairy cows. Cows in early lactation are, therefore, in a vulnerable situation, and any stress that causes a reduction in feed intake may lead to the onset of clinical keto Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Exhibits Anti-inflammatory Properties.

Ketogenic Diet Exhibits Anti-inflammatory Properties.

Abstract The ketogenic diet (KD) is an established treatment for refractory epilepsy, including some inflammation-induced epileptic encephalopathies. In a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever model in rats, we found that animals given the KD for 14 days showed less fever and lower proinflammatory cytokine levels than control animals. However, KD rats exhibited a decrease in circulating levels of arachidonic acid and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of KD was probably not due to an increase in anti-inflammatory n-3 PUFA derivatives. These properties might be of interest in some conditions such as fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy in school-aged children. KEYWORDS: Epilepsy; FIRES; IL-1β; Ketogenic diet; Polyunsaturated fatty acids Continue reading >>

Ketosis Studied Acetonemia And Pregnancy Disease Dual Problem In Cows And In Sheep

Ketosis Studied Acetonemia And Pregnancy Disease Dual Problem In Cows And In Sheep

Symptoms of ketosis in dairy cows- in many cases-are almost identical to those of milk fever. The cows may stagger about and go down, unable to rise to their feet. Often chemical tests upon the urine, milk, or blood are necessary to differentiate be- tween milk fever and ketosis, sometimes called acetonemia. The two diseases can and frequently do exist in the same animal at the same time. When this occurs. the patient should be treated for both diseases. Although alike in some respects, ketosis manifests itself quite differently from milk fever in many ways. Milk fever usu- ally develops within 72 hours after calv- ing while ketosis shows up more often from 10 days to six weeks later. In addi- tion there is a wide variety of other symp- toms which range from almost complete paralysis to cases in a state of extreme excitement. Cows may even act crazy, push against fences, or attack people. Some have poor eyesight or go blind for a day or more. Others are so nearly nor- mal that their illness may not be observed unless careful milk records are kept and a definite drop in production is notice- able. Probably some of the greatest losses are encountered in herds where a number of cows are producing at a rate of five or 10 pounds daily below their capacity, but appear normal otherwise. One of the early symptoms is a poor appetite. The cows may refuse the grain and eat hay list- lessly. Sometimes the appetite is per- verted and they eat dirt, chew on sticks, or other foreign objects. The symptoms are somewhat similar in ketosis of ewes, or pregnancy disease. Af- flicted ewes become listless, refuse to eat and lie down most of the time. When standing, the head niay be held low, but it is sometimes drawn back so that the nose is pointed upward. Continuous shak- ing or tremors of Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms Of Low-carb Diets

Signs & Symptoms Of Low-carb Diets

Low-carb diets promote restriction of carbohydrates -- your body's primary energy source -- to lose weight. While these diets may reduce your appetite and promote short term weight loss, according to MayoClinic.com, they also can cause bothersome side effects and potential health risks, depending upon what you eat and how severely you restrict carbohydrates. Before beginning a low-carb diet, seek approval and guidance from your doctor or dietitian. Video of the Day Your body reaps glucose from carbohydrates in food. Every cell in your body depends upon glucose for energy. When you limit carbohydrates and your body contains too little glucose, it tries to use other substances, such as fat, for fuel. This forces your body into ketosis, an unnatural state wherein your body contains high levels of acidic substances known as ketones. Ketosis is a result of starvation, as when suffering from wasting diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis and advance-stage eating disorders. As your body attempts to flush excess ketones from your body, you'll likely experience a frequent need to urinate and/or increased urine volume. According to MayoClinic.com, this can trigger physical weakness and dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration include dizziness, head rushes, exhaustion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, chills, dark-colored urine, confusion and dry skin. In severe cases, dehydration causes an imbalance of the body's electrolytes, which are important bodily salts that help your muscles, heart and brain work properly. While following a low-carb diet, you may feel emotionally deprived, since many common foods such as breads, cereal, rice, pasta, fruits and most vegetables are restricted. If your diet promotes ketosis, you may also experience emotional irritability, according to MayoClinic.com. Sin Continue reading >>

Sick Day Management On A Ketogenic Diet

Sick Day Management On A Ketogenic Diet

School is out, flowers are blooming, fireworks are in the air and it couldn’t be a worse time to get sick. Let’s face it, we’ve all had those horrible summer sick days. Throw being on a ketogenic diet into the mix, and the result is far from a “summer break”. KetoVie’s ketogenic dietitian specialists, Rebecca Jennings and Mary Susan Spears, share their tips to help make your sick day more manageable. Rebecca and Mary Susan joined the KetoVie team in order to provide additional resources to our customers. Both are practiced ketogenic dietitians and are always happy to answer any questions you may have about the ketogenic diet! Their biographies and contact information can be found on our website here. While these tips are helpful, they do not replace the necessary communication needed with your keto team to ensure safety. Tip #1. Hydrate. Encourage fluids to avoid dehydration. Aim for at least 1 cup of fluids every hour, more if a fever is present. Use water or calorie free beverage choices. Diluted Powerade Zero can be used as an electrolyte replacement drink. Refer to the Charlie Foundation’s list of Low Carb and Carb-Free Products for more beverage options (Signs of dehydration include decreased urine output, dry eyes and dry lips. Tip #2. Maintain diet if possible. As long as the diet is tolerated, continue the diet as prescribed. If nausea, vomiting or diarrhea are a problem, you can try offering casseroles, soups or ketogenic formula such as KetoVie, so every bite and sip is in the prescribed ratio. You may need to temporarily offer reduced calorie or reduced ratio meals such as broth. Return to the prescribed meal plan as able. Contact your keto team if meals or fluids are not tolerated greater than 24 hours. Tip #3. You may see lower ketones during Continue reading >>

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