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Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

Getting Drunk While On The Ketogenic Diet: Is It Safe?

I get it. You want to adopt a healthy lifestyle but you don’t know if drinking alcohol on the ketogenic diet is a smart idea. Obviously alcohol is bad for you. We all know this. And it’s obviously one of the most abused yet socially acceptable substances out there. No one wants to be the guy/gal who doesn’t go out on a friday night just because you’re on a diet. With that being said, it’s important to take necessary precautions especially on a low carb high fat ketogenic diet. It’s completely possible to stay in ketosis and still enjoy a couple drinks here and there. Can I Still Drink Alcohol On The Ketogenic Diet? Yes but you have to be careful. If you want to successfully stay in ketosis, you have to choose your drinks wisely. Drinking low carb or zero carb drinks will ensure that after your body utilizes the alcohol as a source of fuel, that you are back into ketosis immediately after. When we consume alcohol, our body starts working to metabolize it in order to use it as energy. When we start to feel “drunk” this is due to our body’s metabolizing the alcohol. Drinking alcohol disrupts our fat burning processes because it prioritizes the processing of alcohol before anything else since it is toxic to our body’s. This is why some people experience the stalling of weight-loss when they drink alcohol. What Will Happen To My Alcohol Tolerance On The Ketogenic Diet? Since you are restricting any form of glycogen (through carbs) on the ketogenic diet, your liver glycogen storages are already depleted which means you are running off of fats instead of glucose, thus, burning fat more effectively. Someone on a high carb diet has plenty of glycogen stored in their body. This gives your body a buffer before metabolizing alcohol. So what does this all mean ex Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

As the festive party season fast approaches, a common question raised by my clients is ‘Am I able to have an alcoholic drink whilst on the ketogenic diet?’ So I thought I’d put together all of my thoughts around ketosis and alcohol and share it with the rest of my followers. For starters, let take a look at what happens to our body when we consume alcohol. When we drink alcohol, it gets absorbed very quickly into our bloodstream via our stomach and small intestine. Alcohol is toxic and as a result, the body tries to get rid of it as quickly as possible by breaking it down into non toxic substances, carbon dioxide and water. This detoxification process takes place in the liver. The liver is unable to process all of the alcohol in the bloodstream at once, so the body has other ways of getting rid of it, via urine, sweat and even the lungs. Ketosis and alcohol: the effect on weight loss Alcohol is best avoided on a keto diet because it impacts insulin levels and the whole point of eating a ketogenic diet is to control insulin by lowering blood sugar levels enough to allow use fat for fuel (preferably your own body fat if you’re trying to lean down). Insulin is the hormone that prevents this from happening and essentially locks body fat in, preventing it from being an accessible fuel source. When alcohol is consumed, there’s typically an initial rise in blood sugars. The amount to which is rises depends on how much you’ve drank. This is because the body is trying to rid itself of the toxic alcohol, rather than controlling its blood sugar levels. As the body detoxifies, insulin then spikes to allow blood sugar levels to be controlled. Ketone levels also drop. This locks the body fat in and halts the fat burning process! This is exactly the opposite of what we wan Continue reading >>

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

How To Use (and Not To Use) Exogenous Ketones For Weight Loss

“How do I use ketones to help me lose weight?” Great question. It’s worth the few minutes to understand how exogenous ketones can help people lose weight on a ketogenic diet, and not just jump to the conclusion that ketones = weight loss. Breaking Down Ketone Weight Loss Misconceptions The most common misconception (perhaps due to excessive marketing claims) is that taking ketone supplements will induce immediate weight loss. The purpose of this article is to explain how to use ketones as a piece of the puzzle in your weight loss lifestyle. Remember exogenous ketones are supplements. Very effective at what they do, but none the less, should be supplementary to a low carb/ketogenic style of eating that is geared towards weight loss (if weight loss is the goal). Ketones don’t cause weight loss, they help cause ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body is using fatty acids for its primary source of energy. Just because you are using fat does not necessarily mean you are going to be losing weight or have a decrease in body fat percentage over an extended period of time. I have been in deep nutritional ketosis (>3.0mmol/dL) and had an increase in body fat percentage. I’ve also been in deep nutritional ketosis and had a decrease in body fat percentage. It all depends on how much fat and protein you are eating, in addition to being below a carb threshold that will induce ketosis. Please don’t take this to mean starve yourself. It just means that the average male American has over 40,000 calories in stored body fat and can, therefore, afford to eat a lower calorie ketogenic diet, and still survive (and thrive!). Take home message: Exogenous ketones are a tool to get you into ketosis or to boost your energy levels while already in ketosis. If your motive Continue reading >>

Keto Diet And Alcohol

Keto Diet And Alcohol

The ketogenic diet is a great way to lose weight, but it is also a lifestyle change that will stay with you for life. While you won’t be eating the extremely low levels of carbs you eat while you are losing weight once you reach your goals, you will need to restrict carbs in your diet permanently to keep those results. Of course, there are some things you have to give up during the strict, initial induction phase (which makes up the first ten to twelve days of your ketogenic diet plan) that you may not want to commit to giving up for the rest of your life. A key one of these, for many people, is alcohol. How does alcohol affect ketosis? Alcohol does have an impact on weight loss through a ketogenic diet, even when you drink low carb or carb free alcoholic beverages. This is because the body can use alcohol as a source of fuel. It isn’t stored as glycogen, like carbs, so once it is burned off you will go straight back into ketosis, however this does mean you are losing some fat burning time when you drink. How much this affects your weight loss varies between individuals. Some people find their weight loss stalls if they drink anything alcoholic, whereas others find they can drink responsible amounts of wine, hard liquor or a low carb beer (they do exist) and keep losing weight. Can I drink alcohol on a Ketogenic Diet? If you enjoy alcohol then as long as you have finished induction, you can try incorporating some low carb alcoholic drinks into your ketogenic diet, and monitor the results. Some people find they can drink vodka with no problems but their weight loss stalls if they drink wine. It is a case of experimenting and seeing what works for you, and then weighing up the pros and cons of having a drink when you want to. If it is a special occasion, you might acc Continue reading >>

Homemade Keto Electrolyte Drink – Instant Relief Of Keto-flu Symptomes

Homemade Keto Electrolyte Drink – Instant Relief Of Keto-flu Symptomes

I’m writing this article because I feel like there it’s not given enough importance to such a meaningful subject like electrolytes in a ketogenic diet. If you are experiencing one or more symptoms from the list below and you are following a low carb/ ketogenic way of eating, you have for sure an electrolyte deficiency. Electrolytes deficiency it’s common on a super strict low carb diet. Today I’m going to show you how you can make an electrolyte drink at home that will release the “keto flu” symptoms instantly. You don’t have to spend enormous amounts of money on sports drink that are full of sugars and nasty ingredients. What are the signs of the lack of electrolytes? Weakness Tiredness Dizziness Nausea Headache Fatigue Twitching Confusion Anxiety Irritability Muscle Weakness Leg Cramps Constipation The electrolytes are sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, and chloride. YES, you can get them from natural sources like avocado ( potassium), green leafy greens, mushrooms etc. For as long as you include so little carbs in your diet, you should always take care to get enough electrolytes. Otherwise, you experience the symptoms above. When you switch to a low-carb diet, your kidney switches from retaining salt to rapidly excreting it. The body is getting rid of excess water and salt, which is a good thing. From the book “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living”: Low carb diets are natriuretic – they make the kidneys dump sodium. Sodium deficiency can cause headache, dizziness, and fatigue. With continued low carb intake and sodium restriction, at some point, your kidneys start to excrete potassium to conserve sodium. Potassium deficiency can lead to muscle cramps, cardiac dysrhythmia. It can also cause the body to lose muscle, even when there’s Continue reading >>

Pruvit Keto-os – The Ketone Operating System

Pruvit Keto-os – The Ketone Operating System

Pruvit is a trusted health and wellness company with highly known ketone supplements and nutritional products. Their most popular formula is Keto-OS, which stands for Ketone Operating System and it’s a powdered weight-loss ketone drink. The company describes Keto-OS as a powder that you mix with 8-10 oz. of water and within 15-30 minutes it puts the body in a state of Ketosis. Exogenous Ketone supplements are commonly used for weight loss and to enhance physical performance because of their unique properties. When the body lacks glucose, sugars and starchy foods for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this creates a beneficial build-up of acids within the body called ketones. According to multiple studies the benefits of ketones ranges from weight loss, to athletic performance, appetite control and other positive side effects that come from getting the body in a state of Ketosis. When we contacted Pruvit for a quote about their supplements and what they do, here is what they said: Keto-OS is your “ketone operating system” it’is the First Therapeutic Ketone Supplement on the market. The proprietary blend is owned by Prüvit and is Dr. Approved, Lab Tested, University backed and the technology in Keto-OS is patent pending, developed by one of the most world renown Dr.’s and experts on Ketosis. Prüvit was the first company approved by University of South Florida to acquire the sub-license rights to use this patent pending technology. Keto-OS is a powder that you mix with 8=10 oz. of water. Within 15-30 minutes it puts your body into Ketosis. Keto-OS. Keto-OS has a certificate of analysis for purity, consistence and efficacy. Over the past 5 years, Keto-OS has solidified itself as one of the most well known and used ketone supplements. We asked Pruvit why someo Continue reading >>

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

My Experience With Exogenous Ketones & Red Wine

Yesterday was the 8th day of my journey into ketosis. I started on Monday 11th July and was intending to go for a couple of weeks. See my first post here. My first 2 days were the most ‘painful’ in terms of hunger pangs and headaches. I also struggled to sleep well when I finished eating before 9pm and went to bed on an empty stomach. I was in Ketosis on Wednesday and proved this by using ketone strips. These are strips that detect ketones in your urine. I was going ‘darker’ on Thursday and Friday and at a fitness convention in LA called IDEA Fit, I came across exogenous ketones. Find my Facebook live video here which I filmed there. You might have to like the page to see the videos. These are a ketones that you take in externally that put you into, what I think can be called, a ‘false’ state of ketosis, within 30 minutes. This means your liver is actually producing ketones without being starved of carbohydrates for several days. This seems like a very cool bio-hack as it apparently puts you into fat burning mode. I’ve come across these before but I haven’t tested them. The main point about them, is that they help you to get through the “keto flu” – this is when you experience headaches, hunger pangs, dizziness and inability to think properly. Your body literally has to transition energy source from glucose to ketones and it’s a little uncomfortable to say the least. I had heard that you can take these exogenous ketones whilst still eating carbohydrates so I posed this question to this ketone expert at the conference. He confirmed that you can still produce ketones whilst eating carbohydrates using these exogenous ketones. I then asked about alcohol as I said I’d like to have a glass of wine or two that night (it was Friday after all). He said Continue reading >>

Keto Turmeric Milkshake

Keto Turmeric Milkshake

The keto turmeric milkshake is from the new cookbook “The Keto Diet”, written by Leanne Vogel. There is an International book giveaway at the end of this post, so scroll down to read my book review and enter to win your very own copy of The Keto Diet – the complete guide to a high-fat diet. The Keto Diet – the complete guide to a high-fat diet My friend Leanne Vogel has just released her very first printed cookbook, Keto Diet – the complete guide to a high-fat diet. I have been promoting her low carb and keto meal plans here for some time so I was so excited to receive a copy of her paperback. It is enormous, weighing in at a whopping 4lb, so it also works great for kitchen dumbbell curls. She has been working on her book for a year and you can tell. It is an amazing, full and comprehensive guide to living low carb and keto. Inside you will find – 215 pages of information on the keto diet, how keto works, strategies for meal prep and planning more than 125 delectable recipes – all are dairy free and paleo friendly. PLUS 84% are egg-free, 83% are coconut-free, 90% are nightshade-free, 67% are low FODMAP, 91% are nut-free and 42% are vegan making it one of the most versatile low-carb and keto books out there 5 different 28 day meal plans chapters that cover hormone imbalances, cholesterol, customising keto, what to expect when you are in ketosis, shopping guides, eating out guides, restaurant guides, how to avoid “dragon breath”, hair loss and so so much more infographics galore to wrap your head around the many facets of keto and low-carb. To buy The Keto Book from Amazon click here. If your country cannot access Amazon, click here to buy from The Book Depository. They give FREE worldwide delivery. Keto Turmeric Milkshake – the ultimate keto drink Thi Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Green Drink – Can I Still Have My Green Smoothie In Ketosis?

Ketogenic Green Drink – Can I Still Have My Green Smoothie In Ketosis?

So it’s mid-Summer and your right in the middle of that furious diet challenge. Coworkers will be weighing in soon and office humiliation avoidance is on the line. You signed up for this catastrophe and now you have to own it. Maybe your summer weight loss program isn’t truly this dramatic, or maybe it is, but either way, you are likely in pursuit of some sort of health standard and this has potentially led you down the “ketogenic diet” road. Like many diets, a ketogenic diet works for weight loss, but it also challenges traditional health standards. One of the big questions we get around these parts is is my green drink ketogenic? In other words, will your ketosis get disrupted by a green smoothie? Is there such thing as a ketogenic green drink? In short, there most certainly is. The key is looking past the deit dogma and into the eyes of science. What Is Ketosis / Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet means that you lower carbs to such a sparse intake that your body begins to use fat as the primary fuel source. Typically, in the Western, modern diet, the human body relies on carbohydrates for energy. When those carbs are no longer present, the body will shift to utilize the more stable energy of fat. As a result, those who eat a ketogenic diet tend to eat a lot of healthy fats, such as coconut oil, avocados, olive oil and flaxseeds. Avoiding fat on a ketogenic diet is a recipe for health disaster. The amount of carb suppression on a ketogenic diet is debatable and something of a subjective number. For most people, they will find themselves in ketosis after dropping their carb count to less than 40 grams per day after a few days. For others, that number might be much higher, and for others, much lower. Many people use ketostix as a way to tell if they are in ketosis. Continue reading >>

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drinking alcohol has become a big part of modern culture, as has eating carbs. But those things deserve more attention when on keto. How do you drink alcohol on the ketogenic diet? Keto and Alcohol Let’s look into the properties of alcohol. Alcohol is commonly thought of as the 4th macronutrient because it does have calories in it but gives no real energy to the body. The body has no mechanism to store alcohol endogenously because it’s still toxic. Whenever you consume alcohol, the liver will prioritize getting rid of it over everything else. Meaning, while metabolizing alcohol, the body isn’t metabolizing anything else. You’re not burning fat or producing ketones either. Do you get kicked out of ketosis when drinking alcohol? Not entirely, but it can still have some effects on your metabolism, weight loss and overall health. Alcohol While Keto But not all alcohol is created nor metabolized equally. Alcoholic beverages consist of many ingredients. Ethanol, which is the alcohol molecule, is one of them. Additionally, nearly all drinks contain some sort of a sugar compound, which determines the carb content and metabolic effects. Alcohol to avoid on keto Beer is made of barley, hops, yeast, and water. Rich in carbs. Ciders and long drinks are like alcoholic sodas. Wine has grape juice, some sweeter than others. More carbs. Cocktails and sugary mixers have soda, syrups, and juices. Flavored spirits have added sugar and more carbs. In general, the sweeter something tastes, the more carbs it has. You won’t get kicked out of ketosis by drinking a glass of wine or even two. But you will definitely do so with beer, cider, and cocktails. Those margaritas aren’t good for ketones or your waistline. Don’t eat food while drinking alcohol. Because it’s still a toxin, Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Ketosis Is Coffee Ok On A Ketogenic Diet

Caffeine And Ketosis Is Coffee Ok On A Ketogenic Diet

You know how it goes; you just can’t start the day without a good strong coffee to get you up and running. But what about the interaction between caffeine and ketosis, does coffee have a negative effect on a ketogenic diet? Or any LCHF diet for that matter. This is a good question not only for coffee but other caffeinated beverages such as soda, energy drinks, and some supplements. The first thing I’d like to address is that there is no scientific study that points to any negative or positive interaction between caffeine and ketosis. However, Dr. Atkins (for which the Atkins Diet is named) does make a point of advising that people consume caffeine in moderation and that caffeine has been shown to cause hypoglycemic reactions in people who consume large amounts of it. Whether that reaction occurs in people who are on Keto or LCHF diets remains to be known. Personal Experience on Caffeine and Ketosis with my Keto Diet From personal experience I see no negative impact on ketosis from consuming caffeinated beverages, I drink probably too much coffee, the odd energy drink and caffeinated sodas from time to time and still maintain a state of ketosis. The best way to know whether or not what you’re drinking or eating is throwing you out of ketosis is to test yourself with a blood ketone glucose meter like this one here about 45 minutes after consumption. It must also be noted that one guy’s experience doesn’t form the basis of credible scientific research, that my friends would be “bro science.” So it’s for you to make the decision about what is best for you. I drink coffee and sodas because I like them, caffeine certainly isn’t purposely put into my diet for any nutritional benefit, and if you can go life without it, I say, “good on you.” What I can say Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

Do you want to lose weight, build muscle, or feel more fit? Join Beachbody On Demand, and get unlimited access to Beachbody’s world-famous programs, including 21 Day FIX®, CORE DE FORCE®, and P90X®. Don’t miss out on your chance for amazing results. Sign up today! A ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat, adequate protein diet that was initially developed in the ’20s to help people with neurological diseases such as epilepsy. On a ketogenic diet, you’re attempting to get your body into ketosis, which is a metabolic state where you begin to use fat as your primary source of fuel. What Is Ketosis? Usually, our bodies rely on carbs as the first source of energy. Carbs are broken down into sugar when you eat them, leading to the production of insulin, a hormone that tells your cells to use the sugar for energy now or store it for use later. “When you only eat a very limited amount of carbs, your body breaks down fatty acids from fat stores and forms ketones, which are released into the bloodstream by the liver,” says Alissa Rumsey M.S., R.D., C.S.C.S., and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Ketosis occurs when blood ketones are higher than normal.” Ketosis is basically a side effect of fasting. To trigger ketosis, you must fast for about three days, and a proven way to do that is to decrease the amount of carbohydrates in your diet and increase the amount of fat, says Rumsey. So a ketogenic diet — one that is very high in fat with some protein and very little carbohydrates — can be used to get your body into ketosis. To start ketosis and keep it going, you’ll have to eat less than 30 to 40 grams of carbohydrate per day, which is about 5 percent of your overall calories for the day. There are three main types of ketogenic diets Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

One of the most frequently asked questions by people encountering a Zero Carb diet for the first time, especially if they come from a low carb, ketogenic diet background, is… Do I need to be concerned about or measure my level of ketones? I think one of the main reasons this happens is because the descriptive label most often applied to this way of eating is Zero Carb, rather than Zero Plant Foods, All-Meat, or Carnivore (labels which are actually far more descriptively accurate). Additionally, this way of eating probably attracts more people from the low carb community than from any other dietary background. The question comes up often enough that I felt it might be helpful to collect some of the best responses offered by long term Zero Carb practitioners and put them into one place for easy reference. Basically, as you will see from the quotes below, there is no need to measure blood, breath, or urine ketone levels while eating an All-Meat diet in order to experience the benefits that this way of eating offers. ….. Rose Nunez Smith: I’ve been ZC nearly six years. A couple years ago I got scared about cancer (I’m adopted and discovered a long list of direct maternal relatives who died of cancer), so I bought a blood ketone meter, what with all the exciting research starting to happen around ketosis and cancer. When I’d been VLC eight years ago, I turned the ketostix purple consistently, so I figured I’d get a pretty good reading on a blood meter. I couldn’t get above trace. My diet for years had been meat, egg yolks, butter and lard for cooking, water, coffee. That’s it. I began cutting meat and adding more butter. The number nudged up. I cut out beef entirely, eating chicken, pork and fish, and added coconut oil to my coffee. A little more nudge. I ski Continue reading >>

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Many people believe that adherence to a ketogenic diet means avoiding alcohol altogether. Ketogenic.com does not condone the consumption of alcohol and while it may be true that strict ketogenic dieting may entail refraining from alcohol, the everyday ketogenic connoisseur not following the diet for therapeutic reasons may choose to occasionally enjoy low carb drinks. It is interesting to point out that alcohol itself can actually be ketogenic! In short, ethanol (alcohol) is broken down in the liver to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), free acetate, or broken down through various condensation reactions. As we know, acetyl-CoA can either be utilized in the Krebs Cycle, used for ketogenesis, or to produce ketone bodies, acetoacetate (AcAc), or in peripheral blood increases about 20 times the normal level when ethanol is present; n (1)! Along with the rise of acetate, we also see a considerable increase in AcAc and BHB (2). While it is true that alcohol consumption could result in ketogenesis, Ketogenic.com certainly does not condone this method of inducing ketosis for obvious reasons. I know what you’re thinking… you didn’t click on this article to read about the biochemistry of alcohol metabolism – and if you did – check back soon for a much more detailed article on this topic and the science behind alcohol! Odds are you came here to learn how to have low carb drinks while remaining in ketosis. The main thing to remember when drinking is alcohol does contain calories – approximately 7 calories per gram. More importantly to the ketogenic dieter, most alcohols contain a significant amount of carbohydrates, which can not only blunt fat metabolism but also prevent ketogenesis from occurring (3,4,5). It goes without saying that it is critical to always drink respons Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

This article is about a dietary therapy for epilepsy. For information on ketogenic diets as a lifestyle choice or for weight loss, see Low-carbohydrate diet and No-carbohydrate diet. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain-function. However, if there is very little carbohydrate in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Almost half of children, and young people, with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] There is some evidence that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] The most common adverse effect is constipation, affecting about 30% of patients—this was due to fluid restriction, which was once a feature of the diet, but this led to increased risk of kidney stones, and is no longer considered beneficial.[2][3] The original therapeutic diet for paediatric epilepsy provides just enough protein for body growth and repair, and sufficient calories[Note 1] to maintain the correct weight for age and height. The classic therapeutic ketogenic diet was develope Continue reading >>

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