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Ketosis Do Calories Matter

Find Your Keto Macros

Find Your Keto Macros

Fine tune your fat-burning with the perfect keto ratio. Learn the special concerns for protein and fat ratios, how to track your keto macros and where to find the wiggle room. Best keto ratio for rapid fat-burning Printable keto food pyramid Online keto calculator Printable list of keto macros: calories, fat, net carbs, protein Keto macro is short for ketosis macro-nutrient. The three keto macro-nutrients are fats, proteins and carbs. Sometimes, calories are also considered part of the equation. What’s the best keto ratio? “Best” depends on your goals. A typical keto ratio has 75% of calories from fat, 20% of calories from protein and 5% of calories from fiber-rich carbs. A Typical Keto Ratio Keto Tip: A perfect ketogenic ratio happens when the amount of protein grams are equal to or slightly great than the grams of fat. Keto Food Pyramid Keto foods center around healthy fats, with moderate amounts of protein and scant carbs. During ketosis, think of fat as a food group. The Atkins Keto Food Pyramid illustrates which of the 200 ketosis foods to enjoy liberally and which ones to limit. Click the image to view, print or save. Tracking Keto Macros Track keto macros helps identify diet stalls and plateau. Macro tracking pinpoints troublesome keto ratios in your diet. For example: Are you eating enough fat? Are you eating too much protein? Track your keto foods and find out. Keto Wiggle Room If your keto ratio is off a bit, it’s not a big deal. You have wiggle room. If some days are over and some days are under your ideal goals, it’s fine. Keep your calories in check and track your keto macros by averaging several days at a time. A single day won’t make or break your plan. Testing for Ketosis Special test strips called keto sticks (or ketostix, keto strips) are u Continue reading >>

All About Calories, Part 1: Do Calories Count?

All About Calories, Part 1: Do Calories Count?

If you really want to start a catfight in the Paleo world, just raise the topic of calories. Is calories in, calories out a load of baloney, or is it the only legitimate way to lose weight? Do you need to count calories for weight loss? Does a ketogenic diet work because it automatically restricts calories, or because it provides some special metabolic adaptation? As usual, the answer is complicated. And if we try to oversimplify it for the sake of a snappy catchphrase, we’re just making it harder to get to the ultimate goal: better health. So instead of getting caught up in black-and-white thinking about how calories either “count” or “don’t count,” consider that there are really two different arguments going on here: Argument 1: By the first law of thermodynamics, energy cannot be created or destroyed. Weight gain or loss physically must depend on a calorie surplus or deficit. Change in weight = calories in – calories out. Argument 2: Counting calories and increasing exercise (“eat less, move more”) is the best/only way to achieve a calorie deficit and thus lose weight. Agreeing with one of these two statements does not mean that you agree with the other. You can completely accept the calories-in/calories-out theory, but still think that counting calories isn’t the best way to get there. Alternately, you can consider calories-in/calories-out to be incomplete or even incorrect, but still think that counting calories has some value as part of the big picture. As it turns out, that’s exactly what happens, and that’s probably why very intelligent people disagree so strongly on the calorie issue. Argument 1 seems to be true, in a certain very limited sense. But Argument 2, the “eat less, move more” prescription, is so oversimplified that it’s Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Ratio, Calories And Fluids: Do They Matter?

Ketogenic Ratio, Calories And Fluids: Do They Matter?

Go to: Ketogenic Ratio The ketogenic ratio is defined as the ratio of grams of fat to grams of carbohydrate plus protein. Higher ratios result in greater degrees of ketosis. Traditionally, the KD has been calculated based on specific ratios, based on patient age. Infants and teens were generally started on a 3:1 ratio and other children on a 4:1 ratio. The dietary ratio was adjusted to maintain urinary ketones in the moderate to high range (80-160 mg/dL). While higher ratios may confer better seizure control, they may also result in poorer tolerability of the diet (Nylen et al. 2005). A survey of worldwide use of the KD has shown that centers in India and Asia use lower ratios with good success (Kossoff and McGrogan JR, 2005). Furthermore, “newer” variations of the diet, such as the modified Atkins diet and the low glycemic index diet have significantly lower ratios, yet similar efficacy to the traditional diet (Kossoff et al. 2003, Pfeifer and Thiele, 2005). Studies have evaluated the association between higher ketogenic ratios and improved seizure control. In animals, higher ratios correlate with greater efficacy. Bough fed groups of rats KDs with ratios varying from 1:1 to 9:1 (Bough et al. 2000). All diets were calorie-restricted to approximately 90% of the normal daily requirement. Animals were maintained on the diet from P37 to P57-58, when testing to determine seizure susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures was performed. Weight gain and degree of ketosis was assessed for each group. Higher ratios correlated significantly with poorer weight gain and higher mean B-hydroxybutyrate levels (p<0.05 for both). The efficacy was significantly greater for animals fed diets exceeding a 6:1 ratio, compared to those fed 4:1 or 5:1 ratios (p=0.009 and Continue reading >>

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

The Keto diet is not really a diet, but rather a lifestyle change. A Ketogenic diet is best described as a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. Ketogenic Diet Macros Typically, the ketogenic diet consists of only 30-50 grams of carbohydrates a day. High in fat Moderate Protein The beginning of a ketogenic diet can be challenging for some who are not used to eating a very low carbohydrate diet. You’ll probably experience a lack of energy and brain fog as your body is in the beginning stages of making a metabolic shift. This shift is simply your body beginning to use fat for fuel rather than glucose. Your brain and body actually prefers to run on keytones rather than glucose for energy. The goal here is to use the fat on your body as fuel rather than glucose (from sugar or carbs) to burn fat and for overall daily energy requirements. For a full explanation as the ketogenic diet, please see more at: Fastest Method to Burn Fat WITHOUT Exercise Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should I Eat On Keto?

How Many Calories Should I Eat On Keto?

One of the most common questions I see about keto is “how many carbs should I eat in a day?” The next thing people usually want to know is, “how many calories should I eat in a day?” Totally reasonable. There seem to be two schools of thought on this: those who ignore calories, and those who eat at a huge deficit. But, what should you do? So, how many calories should I eat on keto? Well, the answer lies somewhere in between not counting calories at all and going crazy, and being obsessive and eating very few calories. You’ve probably figured that much out, but it’s worth stating anyway. There are many bro science-y keto advocates that preach the fallibility of the calories-in-calories-out model. And they’re not totally wrong – saying 100 calories of corn chips is the same to your body as 100 calories of broccoli isn’t really correct. Your body will get far more out of the broccoli, and it will actually decrease inflammation, whereas the corn chips will create inflammation. As a quick reminder, inflammation is basically excess water in the body, which can cause swelling and weight gain. It also puts pressure on your various organ systems. So, the general idea with foods is that we want to reduce inflammation throughout the body. What are your goals on keto? Not everyone follows a ketogenic diet to lose weight. In fact, there are many medical conditions which studies have shown to be greatly improved by the individual remaining in ketosis. So, if your goal has nothing to do with weight loss, you can pretty much stop reading this article now, and just eat however much you want. ;) For the small minority of you who are trying to actually gain weight, I’d advise a similar protocol as above, but just keep eating. For many people, weight loss is the goal, a Continue reading >>

The Calorie Conundrum: Do Calories Matter In Ketogenic Diet?

The Calorie Conundrum: Do Calories Matter In Ketogenic Diet?

Do counting calories matter in Ketogenic Diet? When people think of calorie counting, they cringe. And, while all of us wish we could eat whatever we want without gaining weight. For most of us this is simply not reality and not how it works. While there are some people who can eat what they want and not gain weight. Most of us have to watch our diet closely and pay close attention to the food we consume. Counting calories is one way people have decided to take charge of their fitness and lead a healthier lifestyle. Along with counting calories, they may decide to go on a low-carb diet in an effort to lose weight. There may be some confusion about calorie counting and what it actually entails and how it can benefit you. Also, whether it is necessary when you are on a low-carb diet. To figure out the answer to this question, it is important to understand what each entails and their purposes. The Idea Behind Counting Calories The reason why people count calories is the simple concept of calories in and calories out. The goal is to burn more than you eat so to create a calorie deficit that results in either weight loss or healthy weight management. Typically, tracking calorie intake and being mindful of physical activity you are performing. This is key to maintaining a healthy weight and staving off obesity that cause serious health problems. The calorie formula takes into account your height, weight, activity levels and age in order to determine the correct number for you. For those who workout every day can eat much more food and still lose weight. While those who are sedentary will have to lower their daily intake. What Is A Keto Diet A Keto diet is an eating plan that changes the dieter’s metabolism from glucose to Ketone bodies. It depends on an almost complete rest Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Anything To Burn Fat As Long As You Are Below Your Caloric Deficit? Or Do You Have To Have A Low Carb Diet To Get Into Ketosis?

Can You Eat Anything To Burn Fat As Long As You Are Below Your Caloric Deficit? Or Do You Have To Have A Low Carb Diet To Get Into Ketosis?

Good questions! First, our bodies need fuel and the first fuel they use is sugars (or carbs), so if you’re eating “anything” as you suggest the only way you would start to burn fat would be if your caloric deficit were enough that you needed to burn more fuel than the sugars and carbs you were putting in your body. This is physically possible on low calorie diets (which is why so many people try them), but usually in order to keep your calories low enough, you will be very hungry all the time. Also, once your body burns the carbs and sugars you eat, it will move on to the fats you eat each day and burn those before it stores them - so you may never lose the excess fat that is stored in your body which is why most people go on calorie-restricted diets to begin with. The difference between a calorie-restricted diet and a low carb diet - or specifically the Ketogenic diet - is that YOU are determining what your body uses for fuel by not giving it carbs and sugars. When your body doesn’t have access to carbs and sugars for fuel, it automatically switches to burning fat - both the fat you eat each day and the excess fat stored in your body. And when your body switches from burning sugars for fuel to burning fat for fuel, your body produces ketones and you are in ketosis. Now some people will tell you that ketosis is dangerous, but unless you are a Type 1 Diabetic (or have a few other types of chronic conditions), ketosis is a normal metabolic state. Many people get ketosis confused with ketoacidosis which is a dangerous condition and mostly happens to Type 1 Diabetics when they burn both glucose and ketones. (Although the keto diet and ketosis are healthy for most people, please know that I’m not a medical professional, so you should definitely check with your doct Continue reading >>

Do Calories Matter On Keto Low Carb Diets?

Do Calories Matter On Keto Low Carb Diets?

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. Do calories matter on keto low carb diets? And, is it important to limit calories for weight loss? Let’s examine the impact of calories when losing weight. Nearly every aspiring fitness trainer and health coach learn early in their education about the “Law of Thermodynamics.” The Law of Thermodynamics, at least when applied to nutrition can be summarized like this: Change in fat mass = Energy consumed – Energy expended People who are trained to counsel people, either through exercise coaching or nutrition, interpret this information as: What you weigh equals how much you eat and how many calories you burn. Or, to put it yet another way, bodyweight equals calories in versus calories out. So, this theory leads one to believe how many calories are needed to lose weight depends on activity level. But is this simple equation accurate? Does it really show the whole picture? Do calories matter on keto low carb diets when you are trying to lose weight? The answer: Yes! But also, No! In a sense, yes calories do matter when it comes to weight loss. But unequivocally more important is what you eat and how the nutrients that are derived from the foods you eat affect fat metabolism. In essence, how your hormones are functioning, specifically when it comes to regulating fat metabolism is vitally more important than just a total caloric daily value. Let’s use an example of how calories aren’t the most important thing when Continue reading >>

When Trying To Get Into Ketosis (while On A Ketogenic Diet), Should You Count Carbs Or Net Carbs?

When Trying To Get Into Ketosis (while On A Ketogenic Diet), Should You Count Carbs Or Net Carbs?

If you want to get into ketosis quickly, count all carbs and keep that count extremely low (under 20 g. per day; fewer will help speed the process more). Keep protein levels at no more than 30% of your daily calories--excess protein will be converted into glucose by the liver, slowing or preventing ketosis. Eat lots of fat--saturated fat is fine, but I'd recommend coconut oil, butter, olive oil, avocado oil, fair trade palm oil--basically anything that people have been eating for thousands of years. (No canola oil or corn oil, for example.) Don't eat if you're not hungry, but when you do eat, eat fat, fat, protein, and just a little bit of carbs that you can't avoid. Do not eat any form of sugar or grain (flour, rice) or starch (potatoes, bread, plantains), including things like breading on fried foods or sauces. If you have access to artificial sweeteners, you can use those, but stay away from sugar alcohols at first--stick to sucralose or stevia at the beginning. If you just avoid sweets completely, you'll lose the taste for them over time. When you do eat more carbs, make them complex and natural, like non-root vegetables and salad. Don't forget to include the small amount of carbs in things like cheese, heavy cream, and eggs. Once you are in ketosis, you can switch to counting net carbs. You can use this system from the beginning, if you don't mind it taking longer to get into ketosis. Use the ketosis strips (google them) to tell when you're in ketosis, and check to make sure that what you're eating doesn't pull you out of ketosis. Why? Because every person is different. Some can eat a lot of carbs and remain in ketosis; others need to eat very few carbs to remain in ketosis. You'll need to figure out which where your personal limits are. Also, keep in mind that the Continue reading >>

If You Have Fasted For 24 Hours Will Eating A Ketogenic Diet Lower Your Rates Of Ketosis By Using The Proteins For Energy Instead Of Fat If You Are Not Keto-adapted?

If You Have Fasted For 24 Hours Will Eating A Ketogenic Diet Lower Your Rates Of Ketosis By Using The Proteins For Energy Instead Of Fat If You Are Not Keto-adapted?

One does NOT burn protein. Protein becomes amino acids which become glucose and it is glucose that competes with the burning of fat. All digested food including the amino acids from digested protein pass through the liver before reaching general circulation. Roughly half of them are metabolized in the liver and converted into glucose. Depending on how much is consumed this may be enough to break ketosis. (The commonly recommended 1.5 grams per kg of body mass is 120 grams for an 80 kg human. That alone becomes 60 grams of glucose which exceeds the commonly recommended 50 grams total when initiating ketosis. ) Even after a fast, one can break ketosis and this is why a ketogenic diet must not include macro levels of protein. For both the novice who might gain one pound of muscle per week and the pro who might plateau at one pound per month, one only needs 20–30 grams of protein beyond the RDA. For most that means 50–70 grams total. If one breaks ketosis and begins to require glucose the body will cannibalize muscle for those amino acids to convert into glucose. It is that damage which must be repaired after the next protein meal and which people try to prevent with still larger protein input. That just feeds the fire until one either saturates the small intestine’s ability to absorb protein (only a 15 gram serving for whey) or saturates the ability of muscle satellite cells to generate muscle nuclei to build new tissue. Better to build muscle slowly in ketosis and not be destroying it between meals. Continue reading >>

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Calorie counting is a great tool for people to use to get a rough idea of caloric intakes, as well as a way to pinpoint mistakes they might have made if they hit a plateau. You might have been told that counting calories is not needed on a ketogenic diet because it causes more weight loss than other diets. That’s not exactly true. Would you be burning more calories than a low fat diet? Most likely, but that’s because of your protein intake. What about high carb vs. low carb? The truth is, there are no studies that properly show a fat loss advantage between low carb and high carb diets. There’s been over 20 long-term studies done in the last 50 years trying to give a solid conclusion on this, but all of the results have been the same: there is no significant difference in weight loss between a low carb and high carb diet. [1][2][3] The Ketogenic Diet and How This Ties In The thing about a ketogenic diet is if you tell people to eat as much as they want, they will tend to eat slightly less than other diets. Naturally, you will eat less if you’re eating food that can satiate you easier. You will have more fullness from vegetables, satiety from protein, feel fuller for longer from the fat, and endure higher levels of thermogenesis from unprocessed foods. So what does that all mean? In a nutshell, it means that you will eat less food, and therefore less calories. Your body can dig into your fat stores, since you’re naturally restricting calories, and you’ll lose weight. With high carb diets, usually with a good amount of processed foods, you will see swings in blood glucose. This makes it easy for people to give in to cravings, and succumb to the “carb addiction” created from serotonin and dopamine. There are no magical metabolic advantages to a ketogenic die Continue reading >>

How Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Do calories matter? How much fat can I eat to lose weight on a ketogenic diet? These are just some of the many questions I focused on when writing this post. What's the Ideal Fat Intake on a Ketogenic Diet? As most of you know, ketogenic diets are high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. The aim of the ketogenic eating is to get your body into a state known as ketosis. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: • 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), • 15-30% of calories from protein, and • 5-10% of calories from carbs. However, percentages are relative and don't say anything about the amount of calories you are eating. Percentages will give you an idea of the macronutrient composition of a diet. To determine the amount of calories, you have to look at absolute numbers - macronutrients in grams. So it's totally different to consume 4,000 kcal and 2,000 kcal on a ketogenic diet. Can I Eat less than 60% of Calories from Fat? Yes, you can. Since you only regulate your energy intake via fat when following a ketogenic diet (protein and carbs remain more or less constant), you may end up eating less than 60% of calories from fat, especially if you are trying to lose weight. This is perfectly fine. In his bestselling books and also in this video, Dr. Stephen Phinney explains the different phases of the ketogenic diet. Depending on your goal, your fat intake will vary in each phase and you will lose different amount of body fat. Weight loss slows down and it's completely natural - you will lose more weight at the beginning (water weight + accelerated fat loss) so don't get discouraged if your weight loss slows down as you get close to your target weight. Why You Need to Use a Keto Calculator Not everyone follows the keto Continue reading >>

What Happens If You Eat 5,800 Calories Daily On An Lchf Diet?

What Happens If You Eat 5,800 Calories Daily On An Lchf Diet?

What happens if you “overeat” on an LCHF diet? It’s a common question and here’s one possible answer. The young man Sam Feltham has done a three-week experiment, where he’s been eating enormous amounts of LCHF-food. On average 5794 calories daily of which “only” 10% as carbohydrates (menu). According to over-simplified calorie counting, energy expenditure isn’t affected by what you eat. All excess calories you eat will then lead to weight gain. If this were true Feltham would have gained 16.5 lbs (7.5 kg) during the three weeks, but in reality he only gained 3.5 lbs (1.7 kg). Here’s the explanation: Theory and Reality There’s a difference between calculated energy surplus and real energy surplus. Apparently Feltham didn’t have a large real energy surplus, as he didn’t gain more weight. The most likely explanation to me is that his energy expenditure increased substantially during the experiment. Maybe there are other explanations? Perhaps his body also adapted by not taking up all the nutrients he ate? I’m not surprised by the results. If you starve long term you don’t lose as much weight as simple calorie counting predicts. The body will decrease the metabolic rate. If you overeat you don’t gain that much weight. The body adapts and tries to maintain an appropriate fat mass. Some find it hard to believe in Felthams results and suggest that he’s lying. I don’t think so. There are several previous reports from people who have done similar experiments – stuffed themselves with copious amounts of LCHF-food. Weight gain tends to be small or non-existent, so Feltham’s results seem to be typical. Hormones The above applies as long as the body’s hormonal regulation is balanced. Eating large amounts of bad carbohydrates may interfere with Continue reading >>

Keto Calculator

Keto Calculator

You will see that a lot of websites pretending the be the masters of the Ketogenic Diet that are trying to tell you that there is an EXACT amount of fat, proteins and carbohydrates that you need to take or your off! This is simply not true, what really matters is the ratio of Ketogenic to Anti-Ketogenic food that you ingest. That is why we had an engineer working on this calculator to make it fully customizable !! The Right Macros I know the ketogenic diet can be quite complex to follow at first if you don't know anything about calories. I created this calculator to help you figure out how many grams of each macro-nutrient you need everyday. The nutrient intake on a ketogenic diet typically works out to about 70-75% of calories from fat, 20-25% from protein, and 5-10% from carbohydrate on a daily basis. How To Use This Calculator 1. First you'll need to know how many calories you need daily. To figure this out, just use our Daily Calorie Intake Calculator bellow and follow the instructions. It will give you the amount of calories needed to maintain your weight, to lose 1 or 2 pounds per week or to gain 1 or 2 pounds per week. Continue reading >>

Does

Does "nutritional Ketosis" Require 85% Fat?

For some if you bring calories into the discussion of low-carb diets, you're pontificating, unless of course you're not. "...of course, if one eats too much fat during that low-carb diet, you're not going to lose weight; there are differences in metabolism, but calories count in the process of eating a low-carb diet." -Steve Phinney August 25, 2012, Ask the Low Carb Experts Podcast I start with Dr. Phinney since he's co-author of The Art & Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, The Art & Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance, and The New Atkins For You. A funny thing happens when you read all three books - you find they all explain the role of calories in a low-carb diet. Imagine that. In The New Atkins for You we find, "Don't count calories, although we ask you to use common sense. In the past, some individuals made the mistake of thinking they could stuff themselves with protein and fat and still lose weight. If the pounds are falling off, forget about calories. But if the scale won't budge or it seems to be taking you forever to lose, you might want to do a reality check, caloriewise." In The Art & Science of Low Carbohydrate Living we find, "The definition of 'maintenance' is that your daily energy intake equals your daily expenditure" Additionally there is, "In order to judge how best to formulate the mix of macro-nutrients in a low-carb diet, it is helpful to visualize how your total energy intake will change from induction to maintenance. As indicated in the graph on the next page, a typical male with a BMI of 34 might start out eating 1600 kcal in induction while his body burns 3200 kcal per day (thus the weight loss). But after losing 50 pounds to a BMI of 27, his daily energy intake will need to increase substantially to eventually maintain him stable at that r Continue reading >>

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