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Ketosis Breathalyzer

Warning: Ketosis Can Trigger False Positives On Breathalyzers

Warning: Ketosis Can Trigger False Positives On Breathalyzers

WARNING: Ketosis Can Trigger False Positives On Breathalyzers Posted on February 25, 2014 by BJJ Caveman 6 Comments Apparently the ketones generated while being in ketosis and the acetone being exhaled via the mouth can trigger a false positive on breathalyzer tests! Came across a few websites discussings this ( here , here , here , here , and here ). I wish someone had made this clear to me before I started experimenting with ketosis, especially since Im often in Los Angeles where they have surprise driving under the infuence stops. Despite the fact that I very rarely drink alcohol now (because it can screw up fat burning ), if I were ever randomly stopped and the officer were so inclined to have me take a breathalyzer test having a false positive that I didnt expect would create a whole host of problems. This definitely registers as one of those things that I wish someone had told me before I started At least now Im telling you! 6 Responses to WARNING: Ketosis Can Trigger False Positives On Breathalyzers Lets go for a ride and get a blood test instead. This only shows up on very cheap personal breathalysers. I bought 2 on ebay, One was 6 bucks and it shows a level while on keto and another was 20 bucks (still relatively cheap) and was three decimal places vs two on the 6 dollar one. Did not register anything while in keto. Verified again that the unit worked when drinking and it registered a level when alcohol was consumed. In the end no one will get a legitimate DUI conviction using a cheap toy breathalyser. Maybe there are some old units kicking around that are not accurate, but I would imagine that there is a standardization for these units. I think Im in the same camp as Ketoman. Although I have zero experience with toy breathalysers, I have had three different b Continue reading >>

False-positive Breath-alcohol Test After A Ketogenic Diet

False-positive Breath-alcohol Test After A Ketogenic Diet

A 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This ‘side effect’ of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. Obesity constitutes a serious threat to health and longevity and among various treatment options, very low calorie diets (VLCD) are frequently used.1, 2 Such diets provide essential proteins and fats but negligible amounts of carbohydrates and they typically furnish 800 kcal/day. After a few days of dieting, fat becomes the main source of energy, and VLCD regimens are consequently ketogenic.3 Ketone bodies (acetone, acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate) increase appreciably in the blood of people on VLCD.4, 5 Acetone is a water-soluble volatile product of metabolism and is therefore exhaled in the breath and excreted in the urine. Indeed, monitoring breath-acetone has been advocated as a way to ensure that patients comply with their VLCD treatment.5 The elimination h Continue reading >>

Breath Acetone Meters

Breath Acetone Meters

Acetone is produced when your body is burning fat, and this can be measured in your breath. There are now a growing number of options for measuring your breath acetone. The devices vary wildly in price, and I've found some of the cheaper options can be quite effective. In all cases, how you breathe when taking a measurement is critical to getting a consistent and accurate reading. Overall, I found that measuring breath acetone to be far more convenient, and far more useful than measuring blood ketone levels. Measuring breath acetone is vastly cheaper than blood tests, and obviously less painful. This allowed me to check my ketone levels throughout the day, enabling me to find more detailed information about how my body reacts to food and exercise. The Ketonix is an FDA approved device that is designed specifically as a breath acetone meter. This is the only device that will give you an acetone reading in Parts Per Million, but is expensive and I found it to be cumbersome to use and I've experienced more erroneous readings than with cheaper devices. A cheap breathalyzer can be used as an improvised breath acetone meter. While these devices are intended to measure alcohol intoxication through breast measurement, the cheaper devices also detect acetone. This means you have to get a cheap, low quality breathalyzer, as the better devices will filter out any acetone. (I like the Greenwon AT6000, (Price Not Available)). There's another dedicated breath acetone meter called Ketometer. It's cheaper than the Ketonix, but more expensive than a cheap breathalyzer. LEVL is a remarkably expensive device for measuring breath acetone, and it requires an ongoing subscription. At the time of writing, it's$699 + $49/month, which is too expensive for me to consider. One interesting note is Continue reading >>

Ketone Breathalyzer Ketometer Fat Low Carb Lchf Athlete Endurance Km2 Ketosis

Ketone Breathalyzer Ketometer Fat Low Carb Lchf Athlete Endurance Km2 Ketosis

Ketone Breathalyzer Ketometer Fat Low Carb LCHF Athlete Endurance Km2 Ketosis Trending price is based on prices over last 90 days. Current slide {CURRENT_SLIDE} of {TOTAL_SLIDES}- Save on Breathalyzers This little device is supposed to measure acetone in exhaled breath. Mine came in a beige case with a loose 2300 mah battery, cable and charging cable. You have to be careful attaching the cable to the circuit board, but the rest is pretty easy; just mind to route the cable round the board in order to close it. I just close it and don't latch the box, holding it firmly closed instead. Breathe into the straw for thirty seconds (two breaths for me) and a reading appears on the display. This is where the questions lie, however; what are these readings? PPM? Mg/L? the nerd in me needs to know. I also wonder if the sensor on the board is specifically for acetone or sensitive to all organics (i. e. alcohol). All in all, I am pretty happy with the device, as the measurements seem so far to correlate with urine and blood ketone testing. Just a little more documentation would be nice. Recommended. Read full review Continue reading >>

Surviving A Breathalyser Test While On A Ketogenic Diet

Surviving A Breathalyser Test While On A Ketogenic Diet

Home > Articles >Surviving a Breathalyser Test while on a Ketogenic Diet Surviving a Breathalyser Test while on a Ketogenic Diet If youre on a ketogenic diet and driving, then you should be aware of this The ketogenic diet highlights a diet low in carbohydrates and high in fats with moderate protein. This unique combination alters the way your body uses energy. The abundant fat is converted to ketone bodies and fatty acids in your liver. Since your body is low in glucose, it will turn to ketone bodies for energy. A ketogenic diet benefits a lot of people. These include people with diabetes, Alzheimers disease, some types of cancer, and epilepsy. It has certainly established its place for being successful in helping people who are overweight lose some kilos. Of course, most of us know the benefits of that. Your heart, brain and muscles love ketones and use them to carry out their tasks. But they can only take in so much. This applies to other organs in your body as well. So, what does your body do when your tissues are full of ketones? It gets rid of them through your kidneys (urine) and lungs (exhaled air). Unfortunately, the ketone acetone that is exhaled from the lungs is converted into isopropanol. Isopropanol is a cousin to the alcohol found in your alcoholic drink, ethanol and like ethanol it can be detected in your breath. Though the rate of isopropanol formation varies from one person to another. Heres where the problem lies. Are you familiar with a breathalyser? You should be if youre on a ketogenic diet. A ketogenic diet can get you into unnecessary trouble if youre not aware of its effect on a breathalyser. This happens when you get pulled over by a police officer and are asked to take an alcohol breath test. A breathalyser is a device that roughly measures y Continue reading >>

How To Test For Ketosis

How To Test For Ketosis

There are a few different ways I’ve learned on How to Test for Ketosis. This becomes extremely important when you are doing the Ketogenic Diet. The Ketogenic diet (Keto diet) has switched your body from using glucose as fuel to burning fat. When you restrict carbohydrates, your body generates ketones and metabolizes fat. You basically become a fat burning machine! I’m not so good at explaining the science behind how this diet works so that’s a very top level way of thinking about it. I can tell you that it works and it makes you feel great! When you start this Keto diet, you are learning which foods you can have and which foods you need to limit or restrict altogether. I remember back when I first started this way of life, I relied heavily on testing for Ketosis so I could tell which foods kicked me out of Ketosis. There are a few different ways you can test Ketones in your body. Ketones are detectable in your breath, urine, and blood. There are a few different devices you can use to test your Ketone levels. Test Ketones in Urine When I started the Keto diet, I started testing my ketone levels with Ketone urine strips. They are fairly inexpensive and you can get them almost anywhere. I have found I can order Ketone Urine test strips on Amazon for way cheaper than getting them local in a store. (thank you, Amazon Prime!) This is what I used in the first 3 months of this diet to aid me in the learning process. After you become fat-adapted, these strips may not be useful to you as they may not be able to give you a positive reading. This was the reason I stopped using them after 3 months. One thing to note, if you are dehydrated (which I was often in the beginning) it will show a deep level of ketones in your urine. I found this to be a false reading for me once I re Continue reading >>

How To Use The Ketonix Breathalyzer

How To Use The Ketonix Breathalyzer

A few months ago, I received my first keto breathalyzer and would like to share my thoughts on this device. The creator of the Ketonix breathalyzer, Michel Lundell, also runs a website to help and support people who use the device for measuring their ketone levels. The price of Ketonix is $ 149 (or $ 169 with the battery). You can buy the Ketonix breathalyzer at Ketonix.com. I was given this device free of charge and I'm not affiliated with Ketonix. The opinions expressed and photos in this post are my own. Measuring Ketones in a Nutshell Before I get to details of how to use the Ketonix breathalyzer, I'd like to start with some basic facts. There are 4 ways to measure your ketone levels: Ketostix. It measures urinary ketones (acetoacetate), is inexpensive but inaccurate because it only measures "wasted" ketones in your urine. In fact, once you get keto-adapted, you may not be able to measure any. Blood Ketone Meter. It measures beta-bydroxybutryate (BHB) and is the most accurate method of measuring ketones (although BHB is not technically a ketone). The drawback is that the strips are fairly expensive, especially if you measure frequently. Observation and following a healthy ketogenic diet. In my opinion, if you don't follow a keto diet for therapeutic purposes (or for performance enhancement), you don't need to measure your ketone levels. In fact, you don't need to follow a very low-carb diet to lose weight. What matters is finding your personal carb intake and also consider other factors that I explained here. Breathalyzer (Ketonix). It measures acetone (acetone is made from a break down of acetoacetate). It's great value for money as it's a one-off payment, there is no need to buy expensive strips and it's accurate enough to tell you whether or not you are in nutrit Continue reading >>

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

A recent article in the International Journal of Obesity should give low-carbers cause for a little alarm. Here is what happened to a man in Sweden on a low-carb diet: We report a case of a 59-year-old man, body mass index 26.6 kg/m2, who began a weight reduction program, partly because of knee pains but also because he was a glider pilot where weight is important. He used a Swedish textbook on obesity treatment written by S Rössner together with the commonly used Swedish VLCD [very low calorie diet] Nutrilett (Cederroths, Stockholm, Sweden), 5 packets/day for 3 weeks, which is an approved standard regimen. This treatment resulted in a weight loss of 7 kg. During dieting, the man discovered that an alcohol ignition interlock device, installed in an official company car, indicated that he had consumed alcohol and the vehicle failed to start. This was confusing because the man was a life-long teetotaller and was therefore both surprised and upset by the result. As he had been supervising private aviation he had access to a second breath-alcohol analyzer, which indicated a simultaneous BAC ranging from 0.01 to 0.02 g/100 ml. A VLCD diet (very-low-calorie diet, a protein-sparing modified fast) contains mainly protein along with a small amount of carbohydrate and very few calories, usually fewer than 1000 per day. Just about anyone going on one of these diets will soon be in producing ketone bodies at a pretty high rate. But the same goes for a more traditional low-carb diet as well. If carbs are kept at a low level, ketosis will occur. In fact, it’s desired. Ketone bodies are water-soluble products of fat metabolism. The body has three ways of dealing with ketones: it can burn them for energy (which it does with great success), it can release them in the urine (which is Continue reading >>

Measure Breath Ketones Without A Ketonix (using A Cheap Breathalyzer)

Measure Breath Ketones Without A Ketonix (using A Cheap Breathalyzer)

Measure Breath Ketones without a Ketonix (using a cheap breathalyzer) In this post, Ill be showing you how to Measure Breath Ketones using the cheap breathalyzer shown below instead of a ketonix (or blood ketone meter). So, because its Tuesday, Im sharing a tip that will help you along your ketogenic journey. Hopefully, I can provide a little bit of fun entertainment for your even if you dont care about how to measure breath ketones. If youre interested in getting a blood ketone meter for free, CLICK HERE. This simple device is whats called a breathalyzer. Its used to measure the alcohol in your breath by blowing into a sensor, and it gives you a reading in grams per 100ml. In Australia, having an alcohol reading of 0.05g/100ml or higher is considered illegal to drive a motor vehicle. This device usually goes on eBay for around $10. This super cheap device runs on 3 X AAA batteries and gives you an accurate reading very quickly. A ketonix is a device that measures ketones in your breath. The ketones in your breath is not the same as the ketones measured in blood. Breath ketones are a real-time indicator of using fat as fuel, which is a huge advantage compared to measure urine or blood ketones. They are very expensive, ranging up to239.00 USD. This makes the breathalyzer look like a very good option. Acetone as a substance outside of the body is a colorless, volatile, flammable liquid, and is the simplest ketone. Whilst in the body, it is produced by your body whilst in ketosis and used as energy, exactly the same as beta-hydroxybutyrate, commonly known as BHB (usually bound to salts which are also called BHB salts). If you dont already know, ketones are used by the body when carbohydrate is restricted, and fat is being burned for fuel. Youre probably wondering how this Continue reading >>

False-positive Breath-alcohol Test After A Ketogenic Diet.

False-positive Breath-alcohol Test After A Ketogenic Diet.

Abstract A 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. Continue reading >>

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

On measuring Ketones. Like many people, when I first started a Ketogenic diet in early 2014 I bought the Ketostix and just couldn’t wait to see the color change. And change it did! It was neat, and it provided motivation for me to continue. Eventually, I got a blood meter, a breath meter and spent lots of time (and money) testing ketones. Between a Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer, as well as dozens of blood ketone test strips, I’ve probably spent well over $500 testing ketones. The main thing I learned from my extensive ketone testing regimen is that the results vary widely and there’s little application to my goals. Eventually, I stopped testing and here are several reasons why: 1. Burning fatty acids from fat is the main benefit of a ketogenic diet On a ketogenic diet, some of the brain’s energetic demand is fueled by ketones, but the heart, muscles, etc. are fueled by fatty acids. Most of the energy we utilize both at rest and at sub-maximal exertion on a ketogenic diet is fatty acid, not ketones. Quoting Dr. Ron Rosedale on chasing ketones at the Keto Summit: “I don’t want people to have the mindset that it’s the ketones that are the benefit of the diet. They are a beneficial side effect, but the main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids from fat. The more fatty acids from fat you are burning, the less glucose you need to burn. And that’s really where you are getting the benefit…So ketones are great but the term ketogenic diet indicating that the diet is so good because you are generating all these ketones is a misinterpretation of the benefit. The main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids, and as a side effect of burning fatty acids you are producing ketones that your body can burn too!” 2. Urine Ketones aka “peetones” are ridic Continue reading >>

False Breathalyzer Results From Acetone In Breath: Breathalyzers Often Give Inflated Readings

False Breathalyzer Results From Acetone In Breath: Breathalyzers Often Give Inflated Readings

False breathalyzer results are caused by any of a number of things. (‘Breathalyzer’ has become generic for any alcohol breath testing device. But it’s actually a brand name. Others are Alcoscan, Alcosensor, BAC Datamaster, and Intoxilyzer.) Acetone Acetone in the breath is one cause of false blood alcohol concentration (BAC) results from breathalyzers. Readings from such machines are actually only indirect estimates of BAC. In reality, only a sample of blood itself can yield a true measure of BAC. It is clear from scientific research that acetone exists in the breath of average people. And it can be high enough to cause false readings. Thus, it can cause conviction of innocent drivers. Hypoglycemia is a significant cause of acetone in the breath. And diabetics can have levels of acetone in the breath high enough to get false readings of .06. Symptoms Hypoglycemia also causes symptoms similar to those of intoxication. They include shakiness, dizziness, clumsiness, jerky movements, difficulty paying attention, and confusion. The U.S. federal government (CDC) reports that 23.6 million people in the country have diabetes. About 5.7 million of these don’t know they have the disease. Other things can also cause hypoglycemia. Conditions such as cardiac, kidney and liver diseases. Aspirin in large doses, sulfa medications and pseudo ephedrine. Overexertion, fright or anxiety. Diet soda. Either fasting or dieting can also cause much higher levels of acetone. Research has shown that fasting can increase the acetone level high enough to give a false reading (estimate) of .06 BAC. A low-carbohydrate diet can increase acetone levels. The body produces more acetone as it tries to compensate for the reduced glucose in the diet. Those who follow the Atkins and similar diets int Continue reading >>

How Low-carb / High-protein Diets Can

How Low-carb / High-protein Diets Can "trick" A California Dui Breath Test

Some medical and physiological conditions can cause California DUI breath tests to produce falsely high results. Such conditions include: hypoglycemia, fasting, and high-protein / low-carbohydrate diets (such as the Atkins and Paleo diets). These conditions involve insufficient carbohydrate intake for energy, or -- in the case of diabetes -- insufficient insulin to keep blood sugar levels in check. The result in both cases is the body's production of "ketones.” Ketones are similar in chemical composition to isopropyl alcohol, the type of alcohol found in solvents such as acetone.1 They are different from ethyl alcohol, the type of alcohol in an alcoholic beverage. Many DUI breath testing devices cannot reliably distinguish ketones from ethyl alcohol. Worse, “ketosis” can produce visible signs that mimic alcohol impairment, including: dehydration and excessive thirst, sluggishness, flushed face, decreased coordination, and even As a result, people with hypoglycemia… or who follow a low carbohydrate diet… are often falsely accused of: To help you better understand how these conditions can lead to a falsely high DUI breath test, our California DUI defense attorneys discuss the following, below: 1. What are ketones? Normally, our bodies get energy from carbohydrates in our diet. When we eat foods containing carbohydrates, our digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar. One of these sugar molecules is glucose, the main energy source for our bodies. Glucose is absorbed into the bloodstream after eating. We often refer to this as “blood sugar.”3 When we don't eat enough carbohydrates to produce the blood sugar we need, our bodies have to burn our fat stores instead.4 Fats are broken down in the liver. There, they are turned into ketones and ketoa Continue reading >>

Can A Low-carb Diet Lead To A False-positive Breathalyzer Result?

Can A Low-carb Diet Lead To A False-positive Breathalyzer Result?

The basic idea behind low-carb dieting is simple: by denying the body a food supply of carbohydrates to convert into energy, you can force it to burn its fat reserves instead through a process known as “ketosis.” Research suggests that this may be a mixed blessing, however, if you should ever find yourself the subject of a breathalyzer test. How can a low-carb diet trigger a false positive? To understand how ketosis can contribute to skewed breath test readings for alcohol, the first thing to consider is that there are different types of alcohol. Most people are familiar with ethanol, the “grain alcohol” that is found in alcoholic beverages, and methanol, or “wood alcohol” that is unfit for human consumption; but other forms exist as well, like isopropanol and ethylene glycol. All of these variations have at least one thing in common, a breathalyzer cannot differentiate among them; and ketosis can have the effect of creating isopropanol that a breathalyzer can detect in the same way as ethanol. Here is how the process works: 1. When you do not consume enough carbohydrates, the body breaks down fat cells for energy (ketosis can also result from prolonged exercise or from diabetes). 2. A byproduct of ketosis is ketones; and one form of ketone is acetone. 3. Acetone breaks down into isopropanol in the body, which a breathalyzer or an ignition interlock device cannot tell apart from ethanol. Although modern breathalyzer devices can tell the difference between acetone and alcohol, incidents have still been recorded in which a person who has consumed little or no alcohol, but who is producing ketones that have converted into isopropanol, has generated a false positive breath test sample for alcohol. What does this mean for you? Chances are that if you have not bee Continue reading >>

Can Low-carb Get You Arrested For Dui?

Can Low-carb Get You Arrested For Dui?

Does Fall Make You Fall From Low-Carb Living? It is quite possible to fail a breathalyzer test because of low-carb You decided to start livin la vida low-carb and youre losing an incredible amount of weight. Everything is going great for you when all of a sudden you are driving down the road one day and you see blue lights flashing at you in your rearview mirror. You pull off to the side of the road and the officer asks you to step out of your vehicle for a breathalyzer test. Despite the fact that you havent drunk a single drop of alcohol whatsoever, lo and behold your blood alcohol content registers a whopping 0.09%higher than the legal limit. You are handcuffed, hauled down to the local jail and treated like a criminal for driving under the influence. WHAT THE HECK IS GOING ON?! IM NOT DRUNK! Dont laugh at this story because it is very serious and could happen to YOU if you are in the right set of circumstances. It seems the breathalyzer tests used by law enforcement officials can register a false reading based on elevated ketone levels in your body. As you know, people who are on the low-carb lifestyle, especially in the most ketogenic stages eating around 20-40g carbs daily, induce heavy ketosis in their body to begin burning all that stored fat thats inside of them. Thats what makes low-carb work so spectacular! But a recent experiment by a scientist friend of mine showed those excess ketones that come from livin la vida low-carb can actually show up on the breathalyzer test in a negative way and create a false positive for the presence of alcohol. Conducted over several weeks, the scientist first made sure his body was not in ketosis and tested his blood alcohol content. Predictably, it came back with a ZERO reading. Then he allowed his body to get into ketosis a Continue reading >>

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