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Ketosis Breath Smells Like

Bad Breath

Bad Breath

Do you fear your breath is strong enough to scare small children? You might be mistaken. People are notoriously inept at assessing the odor of their own exhalations. A breath-mint addict who constantly worries about his breath may never have had a problem. At the same time, a person with truly noxious breath may be baffled when friends start offering mints or backing away during a conversation. If you're worried about your breath, get a second opinion: Ask a close friend or loved one if your breath is up to par, and urge them to be honest. If the news isn't good, don't panic. Bad breath doesn't have to be permanent. By taking a few simple steps, you can freshen your breath and win back your confidence. Yogurt Might Help Men Avoid Colon Cancer: Study Bad breath, also known as halitosis, may go far beyond a tinge of garlic or onions. Like other types of body odor (the aroma of sweaty feet, for instance), many forms of halitosis are the handiwork of bacteria. When the germs that live in the mouth break down food particles and other debris, they often foul the air with highly pungent chemicals. For example, some types of oral bacteria produce hydrogen sulfide, the compound that lends the distinctive aroma to rotten eggs. Others produce methyl mercaptan, the chemical that makes feces smell like feces. Still others release putrescine, the aroma of rotten meat. As for the bacteria that produce cadaverine ... well, the name says it all. Hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and other compounds most often associated with bad breath are known in the dental trade as volatile sulfur compounds, or VSCs. ("Volatile" means "vaporous" and "effervescent," in this case.) These odor-causing compounds are produced by microbes that often live on bits of food that cling to the back of the ton Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Gerrards Cross, England (for one year) then Dresher, Pennsylvania, USA: My six year old adopted son has had acetone breath consistently for several weeks. I've tested his urine with the strips for glucose and ketones twice, and they are both negative. He has had this previously only when he was slightly dehydrated from bouts of nausea and vomiting. He is otherwise perfectly healthy and active and has no symptoms of diabetes. We have a dog with diabetes which is why I am familiar with the signs and the breath odor and have the urine strips. Are there other causes of acetone breath in an otherwise normal six year old? In view of the negative strips should I still have his blood glucose tested? Answer: Not everyone can smell acetone, but if you can, the most sensitive vehicle is the breath which may explain why urine testing has been negative. Ketosis in children can occur when the body is unable to get sufficient basal energy needs from the metabolism of carbohydrate and resorts to the breakdown of fat stores with the production of ketones. This can occur because of diabetes, but, as you have noticed, this is most likely to occur when appetite is diminished by intercurrent illness. The same can happen if energy consumption is increased and a child is too busy to eat sufficiently. I think it very unlikely that what you describe has anything to do with diabetes, but if you have a diabetic dog and the means of measuring blood sugars you might test your son after a period of energetic activity to see if it is low because the phenomenon I have described is called ketotic hypoglycemia. Additional comments from Dr. Andrea Scaramuzza: When you have excluded diabetes, as in the case of your son because both urine and blood glucose are in normal range, you can take i Continue reading >>

Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

There are different causes for halitosis in cats — some far more serious than others. Your best strategy is to schedule an appointment with your vet. Cats are well known for being exceptionally clean animals. They take pride in their appearance — grooming constantly to remove any offensive odors that might make them detectable to both predators and prey. Occasionally, however, cats sometimes do emit a foul odor. Although there are several possible reasons for a cat to be malodorous, halitosis (bad breath) is the most common cause of fetid felines. The common causes Periodontal disease — inflammation of the tissues surrounding the teeth — is by far the most common cause of bad breath in cats. Periodontal disease is initiated by a build-up of plaque, the sticky bacteria-laden coating on the tooth surface. As the immune system responds to the plaque, the gums become inflamed. Gum inflammation is called gingivitis, and it is the first stage of periodontal disease. Bad breath often accompanies the gingivitis. As inflammation progresses, the second phase of periodontal disease — periodontitis — occurs. Periodontitis is a condition where both the soft tissues and the bony tissues are affected. Cats may develop receding gums, bone loss and continuing halitosis. If not removed from the tooth, plaque mineralizes into tartar (also called calculus) in a few days. Calculus requires professional removal by your veterinarian. Although periodontal disease and gingivitis tend to develop as cats age, gingivitis can occur in cats as young as six months. These cats often have little or no calculus accumulation. We call this condition “juvenile-onset gingivitis,” and it is a common cause of halitosis in kittens. The exact cause of this condition is unknown, but experts belie Continue reading >>

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

The Causes And Solutions For Bad Breath (ketosis Breath)

If you’re on a low-carb diet, not all the outcomes are good. One of the side effects you could notice is bad breath. It’s commonly nicknamed ketosis breath, whether it happens when following the ketosis diet, but it can happen with all low carb/high protein diets. In fact, bad breath is becoming an epidemic. This is because so many people now are following these low carb diets. So, you’re definitely not alone. In fact, scientists say that 40% of people on these types of diets report bad breath as one of the worst side effects. I’ve been in your position before with my low carb diets. Your best friend likely has, too. We just get so embarrassed about our bad breath that we tend not to mention it. We just hope that we can mask it with some breath mints. But what is the real cause of bad breath on the ketosis diet? Just why do low carb diets make us stink? And is there anything that we can do to stop the problem? I can share some very positive news. You can stop ketosis breath becoming an issue. You don’t need to become part of the growing epidemic. I’m going to share everything that you can do to stop ketosis breath becoming a problem. So, Why Do We Get Bad Breath? Let’s start with how low carb diets work. When we stop feeding ourselves as many carbs, our bodies have to get the energy in other ways. They do this through the burning of fat, which means the release of ketones in the body. It’s a chemical process since the body can’t create the carbohydrates that it would need to help It’s this process that is causing the bad breath. The great news is that you’re sticking to your diet and you will see a smaller waistline. It will be successful, and you will be able to lose weight. Of course, the downside is that you have to deal with the breath. The mos Continue reading >>

Why Do We Develop Bad Breath While Fasting?

Why Do We Develop Bad Breath While Fasting?

Friends and others who come into contact with the sufferer hesitate to apprise him of the condition for fear of hurting his sentiments. Some people believe that it is incurable! According to a recent post by cosmetic dentist Houston assistant, Jennifer, Bad breath usually results from periodontal diseases – disease of the gums and other structures supporting teeth, ill-fitting dentures, carious teeth, poor oral hygiene, metabolic activity of bacteria in plaque or putrefaction of sulfide-yielding food (proteins), etc. Contributory factors are smoking, alcohol, sinusitis, lung disease and less commonly diseases of the esophagus. Locally retained bacteria metabolize sulfur-containing amino acids (cysteine, methionine) in protein to yield volatile hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptane. These gases have foul smell. Not only do they stink but they also damage the surrounding tissue. Thus they perpetuate bacterial retention and periodontal disease. At night and between meals conditions are optimal for odor production. That is one reason why we develop bad breath while fasting. So eating regularly may help prevent bad breath. (Breath fresheners may help). Some people advise brushing the tongue, a practice common in India. Periodic scaling will, of course, help. Prolonged fasting may cause a condition called Ketosis. This is from burning of too much fat. Ketosis does not result from just overnight fasting. Fasting has to be longer than that to give rise to ketosis. The body has enough glucose stored as glycogen to see it through about 24 hours. Beyond that it relies on its fat reserves. All the fat that is mobilized is not burnt in the final common pathway of metabolism — the citric acid cycle. The excess fatty acid — acetic acid — gets diverted to the pathway for the f Continue reading >>

A Distinctly Different Bad Breath. Help Identify?

A Distinctly Different Bad Breath. Help Identify?

A distinctly different bad breath. Help identify? A distinctly different "bad breath." Help identify? I have on rare occasion met people who had a most foul breath. I don't know how to describe it, but the odor was very similar, even exact, among every one of them. I can't personally tolerate it. This is the only kind of bad breath that smells so similar. No other bad breath is so similar across the board like this one. I get the impression that it's an infection, that they are aware of it and would like to do something about it. Does anyone have any idea what I'm talking about? Those following a diet with low amounts of carbohydrates tend to experience ketosis. It's identifiable by its "distinctive fruity acetone odor." Perhaps this is what you're talking about? I don't know, but bad breath doesn't get much worse than this. People with chronic post-nasal drip can have pretty bad breath from it. Periodontal disease could also be a culprit. Certain foods and diets can do it too. Don't forget the people who have full-plate dentures with some anaerobic decay by-products wafting out. Sufferers of diabetes, kidney failure, and intestinal parasitic infections also often present with halitosis, as well as the more obvious nasal/oral causes. I vote for garlic breath. That is as bad as any and it is very distinctive. I vote for garlic breath. That is as bad as any and it is very distinctive. My aunt can knock you over with her breath (dentures). I would hate to be around her after a garlic-heavy meal, though come to think of it, the garlic might mask some of it and not be such a bad idea.:rofl: Cadaverdine, putrescine, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, isovaleric acid and ,of course, skatole are all chemical components of bad breath that can arise from poor dental hygiene, in Continue reading >>

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Perhaps the most common reason of bad breath is poor oral health, infections of gums (called gingivitis), or even a more severe problem call periodontitis. But if a patient's breath smells like acetone, then the reason may not involve the oral cavity. It could actually mean that the patient is blowing out acetone with their breath. Yes, the same thing that is contained in nail polish removers and paint thinners could also be created by the body. The reason behind the acetone-like, fruity odor could be ketosis or ketoacidosis. The first condition, which is ketosis, could be a normal thing, but ketoacidosis may be harmful if not taken care of within time. Most of us are dependent on glucose, which we get from the dietary carbohydrates. Glucose is further broken into smaller parts in a process called glycolysis, and the energy is released. While fat serves more as an energy reserve, when there is a deficit of glucose, our body breaks the fat stored in fatty tissues to ketone bodies, and they can be used by almost any bodily cell to fulfill energy needs through a process called ketosis (break down of ketone bodies). Acetone is one of the byproducts of ketosis, and it may also be the primary source of energy if a person is fasting, doing strenuous exercise, or taking a diet that is rich in fats and low in carbs (ketogenic diet). Ketone bodies and its byproducts are acidic in nature, thus making our blood dangerously acidic. Therefore if ketosis is normal, ketoacidosis is a reason to worry. It usually happens in uncontrolled diabetes, especially either due to a missed dose of insulin in type 1 diabetes or when a person does not know about diabetes at all. In case of diabetes, the smell of acetone in our breath could really be strong. In fact, there are anecdotal reports when Continue reading >>

Bad Breath Or Body Odor? The Paleo Fix To ‘turn Down The Stink’

Bad Breath Or Body Odor? The Paleo Fix To ‘turn Down The Stink’

Nothing kills a conversation, business meeting or holiday party quicker than bad breath or body odor. If you’re following a Paleo Diet and experiencing improved health and performance, you may be stumped as to how your breath has suddenly taken a turn for the worst. While this isn’t the case for everyone, increased protein consumption can increase the likelihood of increased bacterial growth in the mouth. These bacteria produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), the malodorous offenders that lead to bad breath.1,2 Furthermore, when it comes to body odor, studies have shown that the odor of non-meat eaters is considered “more attractive” than meat eaters!3 Does this mean you need to stop eating protein if you suffer from bad breath or body odor? Not at all, but you may need to make a few changes. Of course, your number 1 prevention should be maintain good dental hygiene. However, here are five tips you may not know that will help prevent the accumulation of foul-smelling VSCs and the dreaded B.O.: Increase Cooling Foods According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, excess heat in the body leads to symptoms of bad breath, foul–smelling stool, and mucous accumulation. Foods that increase heat in the body are chiefly proteins and grains, so if you’re a Paleo follower the high protein intake may be leading to excess heat, drying up your digestive tract and contributing to constipation, smelly stool, and bad breath. The good news is it’s easy to bring your body back into balance–start increasing your intake of cooling foods, such as radishes, cucumbers, celery, watermelon, cantaloupe, pears, and apples. The Paleo Diet after all focuses upon keep protein intake balanced with vegetables and fruits. Add Fermented Foods Studies show that dysbiosis or the overgrowth of Continue reading >>

What Causes Bad Breath - How To Get Rid Of Bad Breath

What Causes Bad Breath - How To Get Rid Of Bad Breath

You probably already know that it's not a good idea to eat garlic aioli fries before a big date. But what else can give you a bad case of stank breath? Aside from the obvious culprits, like smoking, dry mouth, or halitosis , there are actually a few other, less obvious causes for bad breath. The good news? Once you ID the cause, there are a few quick things you can do to get rid of bad breath. The bad news? You might have to temporarily change up a few aspects of your lifestyle, such as your diet. (You also may have to lay off the garlic aioli fries for a little bit.) Experts weigh in on what might be going on in your mouth and how you can freshen up stat. The ketogenic diet has been ridiculously trendy as of late (bacon can help you lose weight? Sign us up.) But even though you might be getting your fill of crispy ham and eggs on the keto diet, you may also be getting some nasty breath. Basically, when someone goes on a ketogenic diet, they force their body to create molecules called ketones. A specific ketone, called acetone, tends to be excreted in the breath and urine. Acetone has a funky smell that some people say is like rotten fruit, says Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD . Because youre cutting down on carbs and increasing fat intake to use ketones, rather than glucose, for energy and fuel, your body needs to get used to the transition. Luckily, bad breath is only a temporary side effect. Once your body gets used to this ketogenic state (1-2 weeks), the bad breath should subside, Rizzo says. Like the Keto Diet, the Paleo Diet requires you to cut down on carbs. But Paleo focuses on bulking up on protein, rather than eating more fat. Unfortunately, the potential side effect of Paleo and Keto is the same: stanky breath. Paleo diets are often high in protein compared to standa Continue reading >>

Why Low-carb Diets Cause Keto Breath

Why Low-carb Diets Cause Keto Breath

2019 About, Inc. (Dotdash) All rights reserved Richard N. Fogoros, MD, is a retired professor of medicine and board-certified internal medicine physician and cardiologist. He is Verywell's Senior Medical Advisor. Laura Dolson is a health and food writer who develops low-carb and gluten-free recipes for home cooks. Bad breath is one of the possible side effects of a low-carb diet , such as the Atkins Diet , South Beach Diet or Dukan Diet . Known as ketosis breath, or simply keto breath, the condition is often accompanied by a foul taste in the mouth. Symptoms like these can be distressing, but there are things you can do to overcome them without undermining the goals of your diet. There are many causes of bad breath. However, with low-carb diets, there are two primary culprits: ketosis (the metabolic state achieved with a low-carb diet) and protein metabolism . One of the body's primary sources of energy is glucose. Glucose is created when the digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates from complex sugars to simple glucose molecules. When you reduce the number of carbs you eat, your body has to find alternative fuel sources (namely fat) for energya metabolic state known as ketosis. When the body breaks down fatty acids, it creates a byproduct known as ketones . Common ketone bodies come in three forms: acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone. These ketone bodies are regularly removed from your body through urination and exhalation. If you're on a low-carb diet, your body is relying more on fatty acids for energy because you aren't eating as many carbohydrates. As your body uses up more fat, more ketones will be released as a byproduct of the metabolic process at work. The excessive accumulation of ketones in your body can contribute to bad breath. However, the ke Continue reading >>

How To Detect Ketosis

How To Detect Ketosis

How can you tell if your low-carbing efforts have been effective enough to induce ketosis? Learn how to check your ketones! The state of ketosis The state of ketosis means that the body has switched from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. This means not only dietary fats (olive oil, guacamole, deep-fried pig ears), but also all the jiggly bits around your waist — clearly a desirable state for anyone looking to shed extra weight. When the body metabolizes fat, it generates molecules called ketones (also known as ketone bodies). As you restrict carbohydrate intake and amp up the dietary fat, more fat is metabolized and a greater quantity of ketones are created. Most of the cells in your body — including those in your brain — are able to use ketones for energy, although many people experience a few days’ adjustment period, often called the low carb flu. One of the varieties of ketones generated — acetone — cannot be used by the body and is excreted as waste, mostly in the urine and the breath. Conveniently, this makes it very simple to measure whether or not you are in ketosis. Upon entering ketosis, some people report a distinct change in the smell of their breath as a result of the extra released acetone. It could be “fruity” — it’s been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic.” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you’re in ketosis. The unusual smell isn’t anything dangerous, but it could be annoying. Drinking plenty of water should help, or get yourself some sugar-free gum. Most people report “keto-breath” diminishing after the first few weeks. Detecting ketones in urine The more accurate way — and the one we recommend — to check f Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To A Ketogenic Diet

The Ultimate Guide To A Ketogenic Diet

Time to talk Keto. A Ketogenic Diet is a diet with very low or no carbohydrates. Any guide we make will cover everything we can think of to make this the single best resource around, and due to that, you may want to skip some sections. Like always, we will start with the history of this famous diet, get into some science, and blow you away with all the practical advice you will ever need. For those who want to skip ahead, we included a quick table of contents for this very long (6,000 words or so) article. The Legendary Beginning of the Atkins Diet I very well could have made several articles on the Atkins Diet alone. Yes, this is a fad diet. Unlike most fad diets (Cabbage soup, I am looking at you), the ketogenic diet is based on science. Albeit, the sciece of just one study. The story goes like his, the future Dr. Atkins stumbled upon a study in the Jama network, a leading scientific research collective. After reading the study, which was designed to test fat loss on a medical diet, Dr. Atkins invented the Atkins Diet around 1958. My beef with Atkins is the connection of Atkins to real ketogenic science. The connection is a well-known study by Dr. Wishnofsky. The study proved a diet high in fat, and with moderate protein will cause weight loss. The Atkins Diet claim was that this study demonstrated that you could lose weight without a caloric deficit if you eat the right magic meats and fats. Wait, Lose Weight Without a Caloric Deficit? Atkins claimed that the study proved you could lose weight without a caloric deficit. Is it true? Partly. Including water weight you drop from ketosis, you can lose weight without a caloric deficit. My problem with this is Dr. Wishnofsky never said this. The study was not about some magic weight loss combination. (Yes, I link to the st Continue reading >>

Does Burning Fat Cells Cause Bad Breath?

Does Burning Fat Cells Cause Bad Breath?

Burning fat cells does not cause bad breath by itself, but it's possible that your breath smells bad if your diet of choice to burn fat cells involves a very low-carbohydrate eating program. Low-carb diets can cause a condition called ketosis, in which your breath often smells like the chemical acetone. Video of the Day You normally burn carbohydrates for energy, but when you don't have enough carbohydrates available to burn for energy, your body will burn fat instead, according to Fort Valley State University. Burning some fat occasionally doesn't cause ketosis and bad breath, but if your body must rely primarily on fat for energy instead of on carbs, chemicals called ketones can build up in your bloodstream, causing what physicians call ketosis. Once ketones have built up in your bloodstream, your breath begins to smell sweet but bad, according to Fort Valley State University. That's because some of those ketones actually turn into the chemical acetone in your body. Acetone, commonly used as a solvent in industry, smells somewhat sweet. If you're in ketosis, your breath might smell a bit like rotting fruit. Ketosis causes effects other than bad-smelling breath, according to the University of Cincinnati's NetWellness website. If you stay in ketosis long enough, your body will begin to break down its own muscle tissues for fuel, causing fatigue, headaches and nausea. Low-carb dieters often aim for ketosis, believing that it's a sign that their diets are working to burn fat cells. Very low-carb diets do work to help you lose weight, but your kidneys can suffer under the burden of excessive ketones. If you want to burn fat cells but don't want the bad breath and other ill effects involved with a very low-carb diet that causes ketosis, consider trying a diet that's well-ba Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis symptoms are a result of the way the body gets rid of the excess ketone bodies which build up in the blood stream when a person eats a low carb, ketogenic diet. In short, the body has three ways of dealing with excess ketone bodies: First, the muscles liver and brain can burn them for energy in the cells. Second, the body can breathe ketones out through the lungs. And third, the body can flush ketones out through the kidneys and urine. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com The ketosis symptoms associated with the benign dietary ketosis caused by eating a low carb, ketogenic diet are not dangerous. They may differ for each individual, with the most common symptoms being: Ketosis breath, which has a fruity odor, and the person in deep ketosis may feel a sort of slight burning in the nose and a slight smell of ammonia. Dry mouth, which is alleviated by drinking more regular tap or bottled water. (Reverse osmosis water will make this worse.) In the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet, most people experience frequent urination followed by fatigue, as insulin levels come down, and the kidneys release extraneous water stores. Minerals such as sodium, magnesium and potassium are also lost with excreted urine, and it is the mineral loss that causes the fatigue. This can be offset by eating more salt, drinking more fluids, and increasing the intake of magnesium and potassium containing foods. (Dairy foods and avocados are high in potassium, and you can drink broth for more sodium.) A slight headache at first which goes away in a few days. This is usually a sign of not getting enough salt. Ketone bodies become detectable in the urine. Ketone bodies are molecu Continue reading >>

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The keto (low carb, LCHF or whatever you want to call it) diet isn’t all bacon, weight loss and happiness. One of the side effects of being in ketosis can be bad breath, also known as keto breath. Sometimes you get it when you’re starting out with a ketogenic diet and have the keto flu. I’ve learned how to keep keto breath under control so it doesn’t bother me much these days. But when I get dehydrated I start getting that metallic taste in my mouth and know it’s probably keto breath. Luckily I know how to fix it now! Who gets it? Since I’ve been on my keto journey, I’ve encountered 3 types of people: People who don’t get keto breath at all – I don’t know why they’re so lucky. Ketosis just doesn’t seem to affect their breath at all. I have no idea why their bodies react differently. People who sometimes get keto breath – Some people don’t feel the keto breath for days and then suddenly it hits them. It can also be worse around the same time each day. If I had to guess, I’d say it’s when they’re starting to get hungry. People who constantly have keto breath – They have it 24/7, some of them can get rid of it temporarily with tricks (I´ll list some below) but some are unfortunately just beyond that. Honestly, I’m not a medical professional and I can’t explain why everyone’s different when it comes to keto breath. You can have two people who eat the exact same low carb food, one of them gets it and the other one doesn’t. Maybe it has something to do with the individuals metabolism. I’d love to hear from anyone who can explain this to me. What is keto breath like? Most people describe it as a fruity, acetone like smell. It can be quite strong. Some people who suffer from it say that they can feel it and almost taste it, like a Continue reading >>

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