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Ketosis Breath Smells Like

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does My Breath Smell Like Acetone?

People often associate strong smelling breath with the food someone has eaten or poor dental hygiene. But it may reveal much more than that. If a person's breath smells like acetone or nail polish remover, it could indicate health conditions, including diabetes. The way a person's breath smells can be an indicator of their overall health. This article explores why a person's breath might smell like acetone and what this might mean about their health. Contents of this article: How diabetes can affect breath Diabetes can affect the way a person's breath smells and can cause bad breath, or halitosis. In a 2009 study, researchers found that analyzing a person's breath helped to identify prediabetes when diabetes is in its early stages. There are two conditions associated with diabetes that can cause bad breath: gum disease and a high ketone level. The proper name for gum diseases in periodontal disease, and its forms include: Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of gum disease, which may cause a person's breath to smell bad. However, gum disease does not cause a person's breath to smell like acetone. If a person has diabetes and their breath smells like acetone, this is usually caused by high levels of ketones in the blood. Diabetes and acetone breath When diabetes is not managed well, the body does not make enough insulin to break down glucose in the blood. This means that the body's cells do not receive enough glucose to use as energy. When the body cannot get its energy from sugar, it switches to burning fat for fuel instead. The process of breaking down fat to use as energy releases by-products called ketones. Ketone bodies include acetone. Acetone is the same substance that is used in nail varnish remover and is distinguished by its fruity smell. When a pe Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Gerrards Cross, England (for one year) then Dresher, Pennsylvania, USA: My six year old adopted son has had acetone breath consistently for several weeks. I've tested his urine with the strips for glucose and ketones twice, and they are both negative. He has had this previously only when he was slightly dehydrated from bouts of nausea and vomiting. He is otherwise perfectly healthy and active and has no symptoms of diabetes. We have a dog with diabetes which is why I am familiar with the signs and the breath odor and have the urine strips. Are there other causes of acetone breath in an otherwise normal six year old? In view of the negative strips should I still have his blood glucose tested? Answer: Not everyone can smell acetone, but if you can, the most sensitive vehicle is the breath which may explain why urine testing has been negative. Ketosis in children can occur when the body is unable to get sufficient basal energy needs from the metabolism of carbohydrate and resorts to the breakdown of fat stores with the production of ketones. This can occur because of diabetes, but, as you have noticed, this is most likely to occur when appetite is diminished by intercurrent illness. The same can happen if energy consumption is increased and a child is too busy to eat sufficiently. I think it very unlikely that what you describe has anything to do with diabetes, but if you have a diabetic dog and the means of measuring blood sugars you might test your son after a period of energetic activity to see if it is low because the phenomenon I have described is called ketotic hypoglycemia. Additional comments from Dr. Andrea Scaramuzza: When you have excluded diabetes, as in the case of your son because both urine and blood glucose are in normal range, you can take i Continue reading >>

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

Am I In Ketosis? The Symptoms And Signs Of Ketosis.

One of the questions people who are new to the LCHF (keto/ketogenic/low carb) diet frequently ask me is: how do I know if I’m in ketosis? What are the main signs of ketosis? Everyone’s different and while some may experience all of the symptoms of ketosis, some might only feel a couple of them. Some feel none at all. There are basic signs and symptoms that indicate that you’re in ketosis. But please note that I’m differentiating between the signs of keto flu (covered in the post I’m linking to) that many experience in the first days of a ketogenic diet, and the feeling of being in ketosis when the flu has subsided: Dry mouth (eat more salt and drink more water to alleviate this). See my keto breath article here. Weight loss. Yay! Metallic taste in your mouth or a strange taste in the back of your throat. Some describe it as fruity or a little sweet. A kind of “buzzing” feeling that’s hard to describe. Almost euphoric at times. Different kind of urine smell, stronger too! “Ketosis breath” – It can range from being a little sweet to being almost like you’ve had a drink of alcohol. Less appetite. You can go for hours without eating and don’t feel very hungry. Increased energy. If you don’t experience it try to eat more fat. Also, drink more water and watch your electrolytes. A ketone strip you pee on shows a positive result. There are also blood ketone meters, or the popular ketone breath test, that give a more specific result. (Pro-tip: If you get the pee strips, cut them in half ) But do note that even with a positive pee strip it’s not 100% certain that you’re in ketosis. A very dark positive result may only indicate that you’re dehydrated. For me personally, the main signs of ketosis are hard to miss. I just feel different! It’s hard Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb Diets Can Cause Bad Breath

Low-carb diets may be good for your waistline, but you might not be able to say the same for your breath. Low-carb lifestyle junkies are more likely to suffer from a seldom discussed side effect of such diets -- halitosis, aka bad breath. And since more than 25 million people say they have tried the Atkins diet (not to mention other low-carb eating plans), according to the National Marketing Institute, bad breath may be an epidemic! Bad breath in the low/no-carb sect is often caused by certain chemicals that are released in the breath as the body burns fat. They are called ketones, and entering into a fat-burning state of ketosis is the hallmark of the Atkins diet. So the good news is that if your breath stinks, you're probably doing a good job of sticking to that low-carb diet. "Carbohydrates aren't readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem," explains Kenneth Burrell, DDS, the senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. Pass the Bread? This is not an oral hygiene problem, Burrell says, so "all the brushing, flossing, and scraping of the tongue that you can do is not possibly enough to overcome this." The bottom line is that you must "reconsider the diet and modify it so this doesn't happen," he says. Sure, "there may be some ways to mask it by using mouthwashes, but you can't overcome the fundamental problem other than by changing the diet -- or at least introducing some carbohydrates." "It's a difficult problem to solve because if one uses any sucking candy or lozenge, one has to be careful that it has no sugar in it" as sugar is a big no-no on many low-carb eating plans, says S. Lawrence Simon, DDS, a New York City periodon Continue reading >>

5 Strategies To Overcome Keto Breath

5 Strategies To Overcome Keto Breath

5 Strategies to Overcome Keto Breath The ketogenic diet has absolutely exploded in popularity over the last few years and for good reason. The benefits of a low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein diet are astounding and include improvements in inflammation, metabolism, brain function, and the list goes on. Because I often recommend this type of eating style, I have become well aware of some of the challenges that people face when making the switch and one of the biggest complaints I get is keto breath. Shortly after beginning a ketogenic or low-carb diet many people report a persistent breath odor or bad taste in the mouth. This is very common and fortunately it can be negated when you follow the right steps. This article goes over 5 strategies to overcome keto breath naturally. Causes of Keto-Breath A ketogenic diet has many great health benefits, including reducing inflammation and improving fat burning and brain function. While ketones have an incredible therapeutic impact in our body, they also cause a fruity breath. However, many times the cause of the bad breath is not the ketones…but excess protein or possibly poor oral hygiene or digestive distress. When it comes down to it, there are only two primary causes of bad breath that are directly related to a ketogenic eating style and they are: Ketones on the breath and over-consumption of protein. Breathing off Ketones: When we start burning fat as a primary fuel source over carbohydrates our bodies produce different byproducts as a result. The main byproduct of burning fat are the ketone compounds and, although these are what we want for energy, one type of ketone in particular (acetone) is released in the breath and may have a fruity odor in higher amounts (1). There are 2 ways to see if this is from ketones. The f Continue reading >>

Dr Karl's Q&a Forum

Dr Karl's Q&a Forum

Zac goes to the gym a few times a week and when he does chin ups he holds his breath on the last couple. After he completes one of these chin ups he breathes out and his breath stinks like he's been drinking all night. It only seems to work on these short bursts of intense exercise. Is this lactic acid? The mention of ketones and lactic acid in discussion of this question reminded me of the term 'ketoacidosis' from my days studying Agricultural Chemistry at Sydney Uni. From memory it happens in periods of low oxygen and may provide an answer here, but i can't find this in my old notes. All I've found is that alpha-ketoglutarate is part of the tricarboxylic acid (or citric acid or Kreb's) cycle, although this may have nothing to do with it. You may be able to get some information from the Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science at Sydney University, possibly through Dr Edith Lees, who can be found through the phonebook at the university website. Cheers. Terry : , URL : 16:59:00 18 Sep, 2003 EST I was itching to reply when this was being discussed but unfortunately unable to get to a computer or phone, but I can now. Zac's acetic breath is caused by part of a process called Ketosis which happens when your body is attempting to burn fat. Now I'll turn over to Rosemary Stanton ... "In ketosis, fats are incompletely burned and acetoacetic acid is produced. This is then broken down to ketones such as acetone. When acetone is being produced, it is excreted through the lungs (you can smell it on the breath) and in urine. Ketosis is often accompanied by a feeling of nausea, light-headedness, weakness, headache, and, sometimes vomiting." Food for Health 1990. Zac also said that he only smells it after he releases his breath after holding it for his last few repetiti Continue reading >>

Does Burning Fat Cells Cause Bad Breath?

Does Burning Fat Cells Cause Bad Breath?

Burning fat cells does not cause bad breath by itself, but it's possible that your breath smells bad if your diet of choice to burn fat cells involves a very low-carbohydrate eating program. Low-carb diets can cause a condition called ketosis, in which your breath often smells like the chemical acetone. Video of the Day You normally burn carbohydrates for energy, but when you don't have enough carbohydrates available to burn for energy, your body will burn fat instead, according to Fort Valley State University. Burning some fat occasionally doesn't cause ketosis and bad breath, but if your body must rely primarily on fat for energy instead of on carbs, chemicals called ketones can build up in your bloodstream, causing what physicians call ketosis. Once ketones have built up in your bloodstream, your breath begins to smell sweet but bad, according to Fort Valley State University. That's because some of those ketones actually turn into the chemical acetone in your body. Acetone, commonly used as a solvent in industry, smells somewhat sweet. If you're in ketosis, your breath might smell a bit like rotting fruit. Ketosis causes effects other than bad-smelling breath, according to the University of Cincinnati's NetWellness website. If you stay in ketosis long enough, your body will begin to break down its own muscle tissues for fuel, causing fatigue, headaches and nausea. Low-carb dieters often aim for ketosis, believing that it's a sign that their diets are working to burn fat cells. Very low-carb diets do work to help you lose weight, but your kidneys can suffer under the burden of excessive ketones. If you want to burn fat cells but don't want the bad breath and other ill effects involved with a very low-carb diet that causes ketosis, consider trying a diet that's well-ba Continue reading >>

How To Detect Ketosis

How To Detect Ketosis

How can you tell if your low-carbing efforts have been effective enough to induce ketosis? Learn how to check your ketones! The state of ketosis The state of ketosis means that the body has switched from depending on carbohydrates for energy to burning fats for fuel. This means not only dietary fats (olive oil, guacamole, deep-fried pig ears), but also all the jiggly bits around your waist — clearly a desirable state for anyone looking to shed extra weight. When the body metabolizes fat, it generates molecules called ketones (also known as ketone bodies). As you restrict carbohydrate intake and amp up the dietary fat, more fat is metabolized and a greater quantity of ketones are created. Most of the cells in your body — including those in your brain — are able to use ketones for energy, although many people experience a few days’ adjustment period, often called the low carb flu. One of the varieties of ketones generated — acetone — cannot be used by the body and is excreted as waste, mostly in the urine and the breath. Conveniently, this makes it very simple to measure whether or not you are in ketosis. Upon entering ketosis, some people report a distinct change in the smell of their breath as a result of the extra released acetone. It could be “fruity” — it’s been likened to overripe apples — or even “metallic.” If you notice this happening during your first few days of changing your diet, it could be a good sign you’re in ketosis. The unusual smell isn’t anything dangerous, but it could be annoying. Drinking plenty of water should help, or get yourself some sugar-free gum. Most people report “keto-breath” diminishing after the first few weeks. Detecting ketones in urine The more accurate way — and the one we recommend — to check f Continue reading >>

Your Low-carb Diet Is Giving You Disgusting Breath

Your Low-carb Diet Is Giving You Disgusting Breath

A diet that consists mostly of bacon, cheese, steak, and avocados sounds like a dream. A big, greasy dream filled with all the cheddar omelets and ribeye you could want. Deliciously fatty foods usually don't scream "healthy," but many people swear by these staples to lose weight. By eliminating all sugar and most carbs, and eating foods high in fat and protein, your body becomes a fat-burning machine, or so the theory goes. Win-win, right? Not quite. A big downside, other than missing sugar and everything in the bread family (RIP, bagels), is what these extremely low-carb diets do to your breath. By getting your energy from fat and protein rather than carbs, one of the common byproducts is intolerable stank breath, and it’s not because of the bacon grease. What’s causing that garbage mouth? Atkins, the ketogenic diet, and most other low-carb eating plans all rely on getting your daily calories mostly from fat and protein, and very little from carbohydrates. If you keep your carb intake to less than 30 grams per day, your body eventually enters a metabolic state of ketosis. Instead of breaking down carbohydrates to create glucose for energy, your body instead breaks down stored fat, which release ketones in the body. They are also released in your breath, creating a distinct odor that some keto enthusiasts describe as rotten fruit, or even metallic. "I lost 114 pounds on this diet but I had BREATH like acetone," one Facebook user commented on a story about the ketogenic diet. "I've had truly repellent, revolting bad breath," Reddit user LisaJA posted. "My friends and family have rated it about a 7 or 8 [out of] 10. My teenager has to open the car windows, it's that bad!" The influx of ketones may be the biggest culprit of your nasty breath, but there are other factor Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath – What Is It And How To Cure It

Ketosis Breath – What Is It And How To Cure It

People who eat according to keto diet sometimes get something called ketosis breath. The ketosis breath smell can be very special and could affect your social life. It could also be something that irritates you personally if you do not like the ketosis breath taste or smell. The reason people get a bad ketosis breath smell is usually caused by that when your body is burning fat certain chemicals are released in your breath. This process happens when you enter the state of ketosis and this is what causes the bad ketosis breath smell. It is however not only a bad thing that you have a bad ketosis breath smell. You can use this as an indication that you have actually come into ketosis which is considered as a positive thing when eating according to a keto diet. Carbohydrates aren’t readily available, so you start to use other fats and proteins as your source of energy, and as a result you are going to get a breath problem – Kenneth Burrell, Senior director of the council on scientific affairs of the American Dental Association. However it is easy for people that notice you have a bad ketosis breath to assume you have poor oral hygiene. You should know that no matter how much you brush your teeth, floss or scrape your tongue this will not help to reduce the ketosis breath smell. There is no perfect ketosis breath cure. You will just need to try to reduce how noticeable it is. “If you have a metabolic cause of bad breath, there is very little the dentist can do; you have to change your diet” How to hide bad ketosis breath smell The best way to reduce the bad ketosis breath symptoms is to use mouthwashes or chewing gum. This is however not a 100% solution and it is still possible that people will notice your ketosis breath. You could also try to drink more water and s Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To A Ketogenic Diet

The Ultimate Guide To A Ketogenic Diet

Time to talk Keto. A Ketogenic Diet is a diet with very low or no carbohydrates. Any guide we make will cover everything we can think of to make this the single best resource around, and due to that, you may want to skip some sections. Like always, we will start with the history of this famous diet, get into some science, and blow you away with all the practical advice you will ever need. For those who want to skip ahead, we included a quick table of contents for this very long (6,000 words or so) article. The Legendary Beginning of the Atkins Diet I very well could have made several articles on the Atkins Diet alone. Yes, this is a fad diet. Unlike most fad diets (Cabbage soup, I am looking at you), the ketogenic diet is based on science. Albeit, the sciece of just one study. The story goes like his, the future Dr. Atkins stumbled upon a study in the Jama network, a leading scientific research collective. After reading the study, which was designed to test fat loss on a medical diet, Dr. Atkins invented the Atkins Diet around 1958. My beef with Atkins is the connection of Atkins to real ketogenic science. The connection is a well-known study by Dr. Wishnofsky. The study proved a diet high in fat, and with moderate protein will cause weight loss. The Atkins Diet claim was that this study demonstrated that you could lose weight without a caloric deficit if you eat the right magic meats and fats. Wait, Lose Weight Without a Caloric Deficit? Atkins claimed that the study proved you could lose weight without a caloric deficit. Is it true? Partly. Including water weight you drop from ketosis, you can lose weight without a caloric deficit. My problem with this is Dr. Wishnofsky never said this. The study was not about some magic weight loss combination. (Yes, I link to the st Continue reading >>

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Why Does A Patient's Breath Smell Like Acetone?

Perhaps the most common reason of bad breath is poor oral health, infections of gums (called gingivitis), or even a more severe problem call periodontitis. But if a patient's breath smells like acetone, then the reason may not involve the oral cavity. It could actually mean that the patient is blowing out acetone with their breath. Yes, the same thing that is contained in nail polish removers and paint thinners could also be created by the body. The reason behind the acetone-like, fruity odor could be ketosis or ketoacidosis. The first condition, which is ketosis, could be a normal thing, but ketoacidosis may be harmful if not taken care of within time. Most of us are dependent on glucose, which we get from the dietary carbohydrates. Glucose is further broken into smaller parts in a process called glycolysis, and the energy is released. While fat serves more as an energy reserve, when there is a deficit of glucose, our body breaks the fat stored in fatty tissues to ketone bodies, and they can be used by almost any bodily cell to fulfill energy needs through a process called ketosis (break down of ketone bodies). Acetone is one of the byproducts of ketosis, and it may also be the primary source of energy if a person is fasting, doing strenuous exercise, or taking a diet that is rich in fats and low in carbs (ketogenic diet). Ketone bodies and its byproducts are acidic in nature, thus making our blood dangerously acidic. Therefore if ketosis is normal, ketoacidosis is a reason to worry. It usually happens in uncontrolled diabetes, especially either due to a missed dose of insulin in type 1 diabetes or when a person does not know about diabetes at all. In case of diabetes, the smell of acetone in our breath could really be strong. In fact, there are anecdotal reports when Continue reading >>

Do You Have Bad Breath? From Licking The Back Of A Spoon To Ditching High-protein Diets, Experts Reveal How To Deal With It...and Why Mints Just Make The Problem Worse

Do You Have Bad Breath? From Licking The Back Of A Spoon To Ditching High-protein Diets, Experts Reveal How To Deal With It...and Why Mints Just Make The Problem Worse

The date's gone well, your jokes have been funny and it's soon time for that all-important first kiss. But that age-old worry is never far away - does my breath smell? Bad breath can be a real mood killer, annoying everyone from colleagues to fellow commuters and frightening away potential mates. And while many of us believe a quick breath check - blowing into the palms of the hands and sniffing – is enough to detect an unpleasant odour, experts warn this method is actually ineffective. Instead, they advise licking the back of your wrist or touching a spoon against the tongue for a truer measure of freshness. Here, they reveal the most effective ways of identifying bad breath, and how to get rid of it once and for all… ‘Breathing into the palm of your hand doesn’t always work, as you only really get the smell of your hands and it has to be really bad,’ says Dr Uchenna Okoye, clinical director of London Smiling Dental Group and an Oral B smile director. Instead, she says licking the back of the wrist, waiting until the saliva dries and then smelling it will give a better indication. ‘It’s a way to isolate the saliva. If you have bad breath the saliva will smell. ‘Bacteria in the mouth break down food and make sulphur compounds which is what produces the pong,’ she explains. The smell of breath might change throughout the day, so it’s best to check up to three or four times over the course of 24 hours, she said. Another method is to lick the back of a spoon and once again wait for the saliva to dry, then smell it again. Looking at the tongue can be a good measure of the mouth’s cleanliness. ‘If the tongue is covered in a white coating it means you’re not quite right. There are some people that naturally have a whiter tongue,’ Dr Okoye said. A p Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes And Prevention

Ketosis Breath: Causes And Prevention

Bad breath isn’t life threatening or a health problem but rather socially embarrassing. Usually, bad breath is associated with poor oral hygiene or from eating garlic for lunch. However, adopting a ketogenic diet may be the cause of bad breath. The ketogenic diet has a plethora of amazing health benefits such as, improving fat burning, brain function and reduces inflammation. House of Keto Monitor™ is an accurate breath based device developed to measure the ketone levels in your system. Shortly after starting a ketogenic diet many people report foul breath or a bad taste in their math. This is extremely common and fortunately can be overturned. Find out more: House of Keto Monitor™ Causes Excess Protein People often consume protein as their primary source of calories when adopting a ketogenic diet as they’re reluctant to eating high amounts of fat. When someone consumes higher amounts of protein, ammonia is set free from the body through the breath. The smell varies from fruity or similar to apples that are fermenting or rotting. A high protein diet inhibits the ability to get into ketosis because excess proteins can actually be converted into sugar through gluconeogenesis. It’s also difficult to digest and can have negative impacts on the gut. Ketone Release When we begin burning fat as our primary fuel source as an outcome the body tends to churn out different byproducts. The main byproduct is the ketone compounds which are what are necessary for energy in a ketogenic diet. However, one type of ketone, acetone, is released into the breath and may have a fruity odor, just like the ammonia from the excess protein. Solutions Reduce Protein Intake It’s completely possible to eat a low carb diet without producing a foul odor. The key here is to only eat as much Continue reading >>

Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

Does Your Cat Have Bad Breath?

There are different causes for halitosis in cats — some far more serious than others. Your best strategy is to schedule an appointment with your vet. Cats are well known for being exceptionally clean animals. They take pride in their appearance — grooming constantly to remove any offensive odors that might make them detectable to both predators and prey. Occasionally, however, cats sometimes do emit a foul odor. Although there are several possible reasons for a cat to be malodorous, halitosis (bad breath) is the most common cause of fetid felines. The common causes Periodontal disease — inflammation of the tissues surrounding the teeth — is by far the most common cause of bad breath in cats. Periodontal disease is initiated by a build-up of plaque, the sticky bacteria-laden coating on the tooth surface. As the immune system responds to the plaque, the gums become inflamed. Gum inflammation is called gingivitis, and it is the first stage of periodontal disease. Bad breath often accompanies the gingivitis. As inflammation progresses, the second phase of periodontal disease — periodontitis — occurs. Periodontitis is a condition where both the soft tissues and the bony tissues are affected. Cats may develop receding gums, bone loss and continuing halitosis. If not removed from the tooth, plaque mineralizes into tartar (also called calculus) in a few days. Calculus requires professional removal by your veterinarian. Although periodontal disease and gingivitis tend to develop as cats age, gingivitis can occur in cats as young as six months. These cats often have little or no calculus accumulation. We call this condition “juvenile-onset gingivitis,” and it is a common cause of halitosis in kittens. The exact cause of this condition is unknown, but experts belie Continue reading >>

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