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Ketosis Breath Meter

Using Ketonix Breath Testing For Nutritional Ketosis Review

Using Ketonix Breath Testing For Nutritional Ketosis Review

If you have been a reader of the site before, you’ll know that I used the concepts from the Bulletproof diet and a lot Bulletproof coffee to help put me into nutritional ketosis and lose a bucket load of weight. That sent me down the should I be checking for ketones, but also thinking well if I’m eating (and drinking) so much saturated fat have I reached and maintained a level of nutritional ketosis? I really wanted to know too as nutritional ketosis (not diabetic ketosis!!) is meant to be the place where your brain is meant to work better. It is also the place where, if you do suffer epileptic seizures, that it helps to reduce the frequency of them. Now I don’t have epilepsy, but I do like the idea I am helping my central nervous system function at a better state. That is another reason why I experiment with and do take various supplements, like unfair advantage, adaptogenic herbs and nootropics for the brain. (more on those to come) Use “BIOHACKER” to get a discount at checkout – valid until the end of July 2017. Blood Vs Breath Ketones Testing I think a lot of people try guess when they have hit the magical place called nutritional ketosis. However, we learnt from ketone researcher Dr Brianna Stubbs interview that the three ways to measure ketone levels are using either blood strips, urine testing strips or breath acetone levels. Measuring acetone levels in your breath is the new kid on the block for testing ketone levels.. Now I think that is awesome not having to prick or finger all the time and also saving on not buying ketone strips from a pharmacy. Why Acetone Breath Levels Are Best Listen to Michel Lundell’s interview on episode 14 of the Biohackers Lab podcast. He explains from his tests why he feels measuring breath acetone levels is better than Continue reading >>

Michel Lundell – To Assess Ketosis By Blood Or Breath Testing?

Michel Lundell – To Assess Ketosis By Blood Or Breath Testing?

Michel Lundell looks at the differences between measuring ketones via blood and breath when assessing ketosis. Here’s the latest release from Low Carb Breckenridge 2017 conference. Presentation slides are available here to download in PDF format Michel is a Swedish engineer and inventor who suffered his first seizure in 2004 and was diagnosed with epilepsy in 2012. After searching for methods to avoid the side effects of his seizure medication, Michel discovered the ketogenic diet as a means for controlling his seizures. As Michel came to understand the limitations of blood and urine ketone testing, Michel started investigating the analysis of breath ketones and went on to invent the world’s first commercially available breath ketone analyser, the ‘Ketonix’. Please subscribe to Denver’s Diet Doctor: Join our Low Carb Conferences FB group: All the Low Carb Breckenridge 2017 conference related posts can be found here: Please join us for upcoming events. All the latest conference details can be found here: Continue reading >>

A Detailed Guide On How To Test Your Ketone Levels

A Detailed Guide On How To Test Your Ketone Levels

I have to be honest with you. I’ve been making some critical mistakes. I was assuming that I was in ketosis for months but I’m now finding out that isn’t the case. Not even close. I’ve finally hunkered down and have been measuring my ketones the right way and the results have been pretty surprising. I was eating too much protein, and too little fat. I was eating too frequently. I was eating too few calories. I never would have known this without testing. Time for you to learn from the mistakes I made and test the right way. Ketosis can be a powerful nutrition approach to use switch your metabolism to prioritize for fat loss, mental output, physical performance, and much more. The main problem? Many people just assume that if they are “low carb” they are in ketosis, but think again. How do you know if you’re actually in ketosis? As I love to say, “test, don’t guess” when it comes to your health. (Still trying to get “track, don’t slack” to catch on…) I’ll outline in this article the three ways to test your ketone levels and which you should be doing when. HOW TO TEST YOUR KETONE LEVELS: THREE DIFFERENT WAYS There are three testing methods because there are three forms of ketones in your body: acetate, acetoacetate, and beta-hydroxybutryate. Each of these ketone bodies do slightly different things and are in different forms, so they can be tested individually with different methods. The three different area these ketones exist in your body are your breath, urine or blood. The good news is that all of these ketone level measurements can be done at home, by yourself. You don’t need to go to a lab or use any fancy high-tech gadgetry. Tracking consistently, at least when you’re getting used to a ketogenic diet, is important so you know how mu Continue reading >>

The Best Ketone Meters To Monitor Ketosis – Christmas 2017

The Best Ketone Meters To Monitor Ketosis – Christmas 2017

The goal of a high-fat, low-carb diet is to get into a state called Ketosis where the body burns fat as fuel rather than using glucose as its source of energy. Types of Ketone Meters There are several types of ketone meters available that monitor ketosis in vastly different ways, some more accurate than others and some more convenient others. We’ll discuss 3 types of Ketone Meters available starting with the best on the market today in 2017. Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer The Ketonix breath analyser doesn’t use any blood glucose test or test strip, it works by analysing acetone on your breath that your body produces when you’re in a state of ketosis. The Ketonix is slightly less accurate as blood ketone and glucose meters are per test. But they are more convenient With the Ketonix, you can test yourself an unlimited amount of times, hourly if you like. Which is ideal if you want to see how various foods effect ketosis after you’ve eaten them or even the effects exercise has. The Ketonix is affordable when you take into account the price of test strips for blood monitors. (Many companies give away cheap versions of blood monitors but make their money on testing strips). The Ketonix has no test strips and requires no further outlay. Ketonix also comes with software that will keep a log and also calibrates the device to the optimal settings for your goals. If you’re trying to monitor ketones under conditions such as athletic performance, weight loss, diabetes, alzheimer’s or epilepsy. The Ketonix adjusts its settings to test whether you’re in the ideal range for that condition. The Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer is a one-off payment you can read more & check them out here. Blood Ketone Meter One of the best & most precise ways of monitoring ketosis is with a Continue reading >>

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

On measuring Ketones. Like many people, when I first started a Ketogenic diet in early 2014 I bought the Ketostix and just couldn’t wait to see the color change. And change it did! It was neat, and it provided motivation for me to continue. Eventually, I got a blood meter, a breath meter and spent lots of time (and money) testing ketones. Between a Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer, as well as dozens of blood ketone test strips, I’ve probably spent well over $500 testing ketones. The main thing I learned from my extensive ketone testing regimen is that the results vary widely and there’s little application to my goals. Eventually, I stopped testing and here are several reasons why: 1. Burning fatty acids from fat is the main benefit of a ketogenic diet On a ketogenic diet, some of the brain’s energetic demand is fueled by ketones, but the heart, muscles, etc. are fueled by fatty acids. Most of the energy we utilize both at rest and at sub-maximal exertion on a ketogenic diet is fatty acid, not ketones. Quoting Dr. Ron Rosedale on chasing ketones at the Keto Summit: “I don’t want people to have the mindset that it’s the ketones that are the benefit of the diet. They are a beneficial side effect, but the main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids from fat. The more fatty acids from fat you are burning, the less glucose you need to burn. And that’s really where you are getting the benefit…So ketones are great but the term ketogenic diet indicating that the diet is so good because you are generating all these ketones is a misinterpretation of the benefit. The main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids, and as a side effect of burning fatty acids you are producing ketones that your body can burn too!” 2. Urine Ketones aka “peetones” are ridic Continue reading >>

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

The problem with diets is that we think that one diet should be good for everyone. But research and N=1 experiments show that’s not the case. Learn about measuring ketones and ketosis to understand how your low carb or high fat diet is really affecting you. If there is one area of our bodies that is debated to extremes, with literally hundreds of differing strong opinions on it, it’s nutrition. For many, beliefs about nutrition and diet are tribal. We put ourselves in different camps and we war agains the other camps. Whether it be paleo, low fat, low carb, Atkins, high fat, low protein, vegan, raw vegan and so on. It’s exactly this sort of area where I see data as essential. Without data we have no hope of cutting through the maze of opinions to get to what really works. Part of the problem with nutrition and diets is that we tend to think that one diet should be good for everyone. But increasingly, research and N=1 experiments, are showing that that isn’t the case. And this is exactly why you should pay attention to today’s show. Today, we’re looking at what has relatively recently become the fastest growing nutrition or diet trend. The high fat diet. Also known in different guises as the ketogenic diet, or the low carb diet. And specifically how this can affect our different individual biochemistries, how we can measure “Ketosis” and other biomarkers to understand how our specific biology is reacting to it… and allowing us to troubleshoot and course correct when it isn’t getting the desired results we’re looking for from it. Today’s guest is Jimmy Moore. In 2004, Jimmy, at 32 years, weighed 410 pounds. Since then he has transformed his own biology, shedding all that additional weight with low carb and ketogenic diets. He has also interviewed n Continue reading >>

The Ketonix

The Ketonix

The Swedish made KETONIX is a compass to help you navigate to a lifestyle that achieves ketosis and monitors your daily ketone levels. KETONIX is the first reusable breath ketone analyzer. It is a non-invasive device that detects the level of ketones in your breath indicating the strength of your ketosis. The KETONIX Software enables the user to store their breath acetone results along with other additional data including meals, exercise, body measurements and blood tests. By measuring often and observing what and how different factors affect your ketosis you can learn what food, fasting and activity triggers a raise or fall in your level of ketosis. Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

False-positive Breath-alcohol Test After A Ketogenic Diet.

False-positive Breath-alcohol Test After A Ketogenic Diet.

Abstract A 59-year-old man undergoing weight loss with very low calorie diets (VLCD) attempted to drive a car, which was fitted with an alcohol ignition interlock device, but the vehicle failed to start. Because the man was a teetotaller, he was surprised and upset by this result. VLCD treatment leads to ketonemia with high concentrations of acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate in the blood. The interlock device determines alcohol (ethanol) in breath by electrochemical oxidation, but acetone does not undergo oxidation with this detector. However, under certain circumstances acetone is reduced in the body to isopropanol by hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). The ignition interlock device responds to other alcohols (e.g. methanol, n-propanol and isopropanol), which therefore explains the false-positive result. This 'side effect' of ketogenic diets needs further discussion by authorities when people engaged in safety-sensitive work (e.g. bus drivers and airline pilots) submit to random breath-alcohol tests. Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis With Ketone Strips: Are They Accurate?

Measuring Ketosis With Ketone Strips: Are They Accurate?

Many people following keto diets want to be in ketosis, a natural state in which the body burns fat for fuel. For this reason, people are curious about whether they are doing enough (via carb restriction) to achieve this state. As a result, ketone strips are a popular tool that numerous people use as a way of measuring ketosis. However, just how accurate are they? And how do they compare to alternate methods of measuring ketones? What is Ketosis? Anyone following a standard high-carbohydrate diet will be burning glucose for energy. However, the body can use both carbohydrate and fat for fuel (1). When carbohydrate intake is very low, the body switches to burning fat for energy. As this happens, our body enters a state of ketosis. Ketosis is a natural biological state during which our body burns fat for fuel. While we are “in ketosis,” our blood levels of ketones—a by-product from the breakdown of fats—rise. Measuring these ketones (also known as ‘ketone bodies’) can, therefore, provide a hint as to how deeply our body is (or isn’t) in ketosis. For this reason, ketone strips—which measure the level of ketones—have become increasingly popular in recent times. Key Point: Ketosis is a biological state where the human body burns fat rather than carbs. What are Ketone Test Strips? For people who want to know if they’re in ketosis, ketone test strips are a cheap and simple way of detecting ketone levels. They are otherwise known as ‘ketone sticks’ and work by urinalysis to tell us the volume of acetoacetate in our urine. If you don’t know what acetoacetate is, then let’s start at the beginning. First of all, there are three types of ketone body; Acetoacetate Acetoacetate is one of the two main ketone bodies, and it is present in urine. We can test f Continue reading >>

Ketosense – An Arduino Based Ketosis Detector

Ketosense – An Arduino Based Ketosis Detector

In this post I will go through the hardware and software of the instrument I have made. If you are curious to why I have made it, I would recommend that you start reading the other posts I have done about this project and work your way forward. Just click on Ketosis detector under categories. Introduction The instrument´s purpose is to detect the amount of acetone gas that is present in a persons breath. By measuring the amount of breath acetone gas present in a persons breath, it should be possible to determine wether or not a person is in a state called ketosis. Ketosis is, very simplified, when the body runs on fat rather then carbohydrates. If you eat a ketogenic diet, your ketone levels will be elevated. Currently, the only way to monitor your ketone levels are either to take a blood based test or a urine based test, with test strips that changes color depending on the amount of ketons that are present. Both methods work fine but the blood method is very expensive, about 2$ per test, and the urine method is not very precise. Being the curious type of person, and getting inspired by a podcast where Steve Gibson was talking about building an instrument like this, I decided to give it a shot myself. On a very high level, the instrument consists of an electrochemical gas sensor that is sensitive to various types of gases, a combined hygrometer/thermometer and an Arduino Uno board. The electrochemical gas sensor and hygrometer/thermometer has been placed in a plastic case that serves as a ”gas chamber” that you blow into to collect the gas sample. If there is gas present in the air, the resistance of the sensor will decrease. The decrease of resistance is dependent on three factors; gas concentration, humidity and temperature. If these values are known, it is possi Continue reading >>

My Experience Testing Blood Vs. Breath

My Experience Testing Blood Vs. Breath

I’ve been testing my blood for about 4 months now. After learning of a breath testing analyzer available for sale through Ketonix, I took the leap and ordered one for myself all the way from Sweden. I ordered the sport version, which is red. You can read about the difference on the Ketonix website as they explain it far better than I could! I have continued to test my blood, then use the Ketonix immediately after to see whether the two are consistent. The breath analyzer does not provide a numbered result, but instead flashes different colors to tell you whether you are have little to no acetone in your breath (blue), a small amount (green), moderate amount (yellow), or high levels (red). When my ketone levels as measured by my blood are hovering around 1.0 – 1.4 mmol, the breath analyzer flashes yellow. Yesterday I had a 3.9 mmol result from testing my blood (my highest ever and I’m still not sure why), the breath analyzer registered red, signaling a high level of acetone in my breath. For me, the correlation is good enough between breath and blood. They are measuring different things (beta hydroxybutyrate vs. acetone in your breath) so the results aren’t going to be exactly the same – it’s like comparing apples to oranges. The best part is how easy it is to use. You simply exhale into the analyzer and wait for a color to register. I’ll probably continue to test my blood periodically as that is one way I gauge how different foods affect my ketone levels, but the Ketonix will be my daily tester. Aside from the high up front cost ($149 plus shipping), you will save a lot of money in the long run as compared to purchasing ketone blood testing strips that cost close to $5/piece and are very sensitive to error (I’ve ruined about $50 worth inadvertently over Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis – Quantitative

Nutritional Ketosis – Quantitative

New Rapid Breath Test for Ketosis – Results on your Mobile Device in < 3 minutes! The KetoChek™ Breath Ketone Test is a rapid and convenient way to accurately measure ketones to determine if you are in a state of nutritional ketosis, or “fat-burning”. KetoChek™ does not require blood draws or inconvenient urine samples, just your breath! Accurate results correlate directly with blood ketone levels and are a more reliable indicator of ketosis than urine ketone tests. Health & Wellness Professionals: Support ketogenic diet programs within your practice, while enhancing your practice revenue by testing with KetoChek™ as part of every ketogenic diet program! Quantitative results read, interpreted, and delivered via the innovative BreathScan Lync™ reader*, and sent directly to your mobile device via the free BreathScan™ mobile app! Takes less than 3 minutes! Highly accurate: results closely correlated to the benchmark blood-based ketone testing Facilitates frequent testing and data tracking to monitor if you are currently in a fat-burning ketogenic state Uses patented MPC™ Biosensor technology Small, hand-held disposable cartridge design – test anywhere! (only 5 1/4" long) * KetoChek™ cartridges require the use of the BreathScan Lync™ reader. Click for more information on the BreathScan Lync™ Note: KetoChek™ is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. KetoChek™ is a general wellness product intended to measure (quantitatively) indicators of nutritional ketosis in the exhaled breath of humans. It can be used to promote, track, and/or encourage choice, such as the use of nutritional supplements, diet and exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. General wellness products do not require FDA clearance. The intended use statements Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver breaks down fat to produce ketones. Ketones, on a ketogenic diet, are the primary fuel source for the body. If you’re new to the ketogenic diet and you still have questions, consider reading our Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Keto > There are three main ways to measure the ketones in your body, all of which have their advantages and disadvantages. The most common ways to measure are: Blood Ketone Meter. Very accurate but the strips are extremely expensive. Breath Ketone Meters. More accurate than the urine strips, but can sometimes vary in accuracy. Cheaper than blood strips in the long-run. Urine Stricks. This will answer the question “Am I in ketosis?” but will not provide an accurate measure of blood ketones. Scroll down to read a more in-depth analysis of each, and what we recommend for you. Measuring Ketones with Urine Sticks Urine sticks will always be the cheapest and easiest way to measure ketosis. For beginners, this should cover everything you need – there is no point in getting more complex blood strips so early on when you are still trying to understand the nuances of a ketogenic diet. Ultimately, keto sticks are very easy to use – you hold the sticks in your urine stream for a few seconds, and within 10-15 seconds you should notice a color change in the strip (if you are in ketosis). The color of the stick typically is measured in red: light pink being low in ketone production and dark purple being high in ketone production. While keto sticks can be ideal for a general answer to the question “Am I in ketosis?”, they aren’t precise with their accuracy. They measure the acetoacetate in your urine, which is an unused ketone by the body. As you get deeper into ketosis and your body adapts, your b Continue reading >>

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