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Ketosis Breath

How To Cure Bad Breath With A High Protein Diet

How To Cure Bad Breath With A High Protein Diet

A high-protein, low-carb diet can put your body into ketosis -- a state where your body is burning fat instead of glucose for energy. When you limit your carb intake, your body has to use stored fat for energy, which can be a short-term way to lose a few pounds. When your body burns fat, by-products called ketones are released. You'll expel most of them in urine and perspiration, but some will be expelled in your breath -- and ketones don't smell good. According to a survey by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, 40 percent of people following a low-carb diet reported having bad breath. Video of the Day Don't try to cover bad breath with mints or gum. Instead, brush your teeth more often. Brush, floss and scrape your tongue to help clear the ketones from your mouth. Scraping the back of your tongue will help get rid of most of the problem. Practice good oral hygiene two to three times daily. Drink more water. Keeping your mouth moist may help dispel "keto breath." Drinking water will help restore the proper acid/alkaline balance in your mouth. If your mouth is dry in the winter, try a humidifier in your bedroom. Drinking lots of liquids will also help you pass more ketones in your urine, rather than through exhalation. Remember, exhalation is another means for your body to rid itself of waste. Eat carbs. The only way to truly stop the bad breath caused by ketosis is to take your body out of ketosis. You can choose to eat low-glycemic index carbs that have little effect on your blood sugar, or high-protein carbs such as legumes. Eat more vegetables and fruits for sweeter-smelling breath. If your body can't expel ketones quickly enough, too many may build up in your bloodstream. The buildup of ketones in your bloodstream can lead to a life-threatening coma, Continue reading >>

First Reusable Breath Ketone Analyzer

First Reusable Breath Ketone Analyzer

Ketosis While in ketosis, the body utilizes fatty acids as an alternative source of energy due to the glucose deficit. To accomplish this, acetyl CoA, which is normally oxidized into H2O and CO2 as part of the citric acid cycle, is converted by the liver into acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate, also known as ketone bodies. These ketone bodies are now free to flow where needed and be used as fuel for metabolic processes. It is worthwhile to note that ketone bodies are very effective respiratory fuels; whereas 100 g of glucose generates 8.7 kg of ATP, 100 g of 3-hydroxybutyrate can yield 10.5 kg of ATP, and 100 g of acetoacetate 9.4 kg of ATP. Most areas of the body, such as the brain, will use ketones whenever provided to them (in fact the blood-brain barrier has a very effective transporter for ketone bodies). However, there are still some processes that are partial to glucose for energy metabolism. In these cases, glucose is supplied by hepatic gluconegenesis, where the liver converts non-carbohydrate sources (such as fatty acids and amino acids) into glucose. Correlation between breath acetone and blood beta-hydroxybutyrate. A common misunderstanding is that breath acetone directly correlates to the blood test ketone beta-hydroxybutyrate. It is easy to make that assumption, and in some contexts it appears to be correlating. Fatty acids break down in liver to acetoacetate. Acetone is spontaneously released from the AcetoAcetate. Excess AcetoAcetate is stored in blood as beta-hydroxybutyrate. The concentration of Beta-hydroxybutyrate is a product of the ketosis and time. The concentration of Acetone in breath is indicating the strength of ketosis. The Acetone in breath is correlating well to your blood glucose. So in the case of fasting, your breath Acetone will more or Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Keto Breath: Cause And Remedies

Keto Breath: Cause And Remedies

You’ve been on a ketogenic way of eating for a couple of weeks now, and you’ve stayed under your 20g of carbs every day. Congratulations on your dedication, your reward is… stinky breath? That’s right, most people who try keto at some point in the first month or so of being in ketosis will experience some unpleasant breath. Some people describe it as “metal smell” or having “metallic taste in the mouth”. What a fun reward for choosing a healthful way of eating! The Cause of Keto Breath The explanation is simple, though it’s usually unavoidable, at least until you’re fully fat adapted. As the body shifts into ketosis, it turns fats into ketone bodies, specifically beta hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone. They are all completely normal and healthy to have in the body in the amounts it produces. These ketone bodies, especially acetone, can be detected by smell on the breath. This is actually one of the most reliable ways to tell when you have gotten into ketosis, and can be smelled more easily when you are deeper into this fat burning carbohydrate deprived state. Studies have shown this, and there are devices such as breath ketone test monitor that can measure the amount of acetone in your breath, and tell you the level of ketones that you’re producing (1). The science of this lays in the lungs, and the blood vessels that supply them. Since ketones circulate in the blood, they interact with the small air sacs in the lungs. As these ketones are exposed to the air in your body, they are expelled as a gas, with the distinctive odor of acetone. How Long Does Ketosis Breath Last? Some people never experience this phenomenon, even when they are doing the keto diet correctly and healthfully. Others experience it more as a taste than as an odour. For Continue reading >>

5 Strategies To Overcome Keto Breath

5 Strategies To Overcome Keto Breath

5 Strategies to Overcome Keto Breath The ketogenic diet has absolutely exploded in popularity over the last few years and for good reason. The benefits of a low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein diet are astounding and include improvements in inflammation, metabolism, brain function, and the list goes on. Because I often recommend this type of eating style, I have become well aware of some of the challenges that people face when making the switch and one of the biggest complaints I get is keto breath. Shortly after beginning a ketogenic or low-carb diet many people report a persistent breath odor or bad taste in the mouth. This is very common and fortunately it can be negated when you follow the right steps. This article goes over 5 strategies to overcome keto breath naturally. Causes of Keto-Breath A ketogenic diet has many great health benefits, including reducing inflammation and improving fat burning and brain function. While ketones have an incredible therapeutic impact in our body, they also cause a fruity breath. However, many times the cause of the bad breath is not the ketones…but excess protein or possibly poor oral hygiene or digestive distress. When it comes down to it, there are only two primary causes of bad breath that are directly related to a ketogenic eating style and they are: Ketones on the breath and over-consumption of protein. Breathing off Ketones: When we start burning fat as a primary fuel source over carbohydrates our bodies produce different byproducts as a result. The main byproduct of burning fat are the ketone compounds and, although these are what we want for energy, one type of ketone in particular (acetone) is released in the breath and may have a fruity odor in higher amounts (1). There are 2 ways to see if this is from ketones. The f Continue reading >>

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The Solution To Keto Breath – An Annoying Low Carb Side Effect

The keto (low carb, LCHF or whatever you want to call it) diet isn’t all bacon, weight loss and happiness. One of the side effects of being in ketosis can be bad breath, also known as keto breath. Sometimes you get it when you’re starting out with a ketogenic diet and have the keto flu. I’ve learned how to keep keto breath under control so it doesn’t bother me much these days. But when I get dehydrated I start getting that metallic taste in my mouth and know it’s probably keto breath. Luckily I know how to fix it now! Who gets it? Since I’ve been on my keto journey, I’ve encountered 3 types of people: People who don’t get keto breath at all – I don’t know why they’re so lucky. Ketosis just doesn’t seem to affect their breath at all. I have no idea why their bodies react differently. People who sometimes get keto breath – Some people don’t feel the keto breath for days and then suddenly it hits them. It can also be worse around the same time each day. If I had to guess, I’d say it’s when they’re starting to get hungry. People who constantly have keto breath – They have it 24/7, some of them can get rid of it temporarily with tricks (I´ll list some below) but some are unfortunately just beyond that. Honestly, I’m not a medical professional and I can’t explain why everyone’s different when it comes to keto breath. You can have two people who eat the exact same low carb food, one of them gets it and the other one doesn’t. Maybe it has something to do with the individuals metabolism. I’d love to hear from anyone who can explain this to me. What is keto breath like? Most people describe it as a fruity, acetone like smell. It can be quite strong. Some people who suffer from it say that they can feel it and almost taste it, like a Continue reading >>

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals.

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Ketogenic diets are used therapeutically to treat intractable seizures. Clinically, it appears that the maintenance of ketosis is crucial to the efficacy of the diet in ameliorating seizures. To understand how ketosis and seizure protection are related, a reliable, noninvasive measure of ketosis that can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort is needed. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to determine which index, breath acetone or urinary acetoacetate, is more strongly related to the plasma ketones acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate. DESIGN: After fasting overnight for 12 h, 12 healthy adults consumed 4 ketogenic meals over 12 h. Blood, breath, and urine samples were collected hourly. Blood was analyzed for plasma acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate, breath for acetone, and urine for acetoacetate. RESULTS: By the end of the 12-h dietary treatment, plasma acetoacetate, plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate, and breath acetone had increased 3.5-fold, whereas urinary acetoacetate increased 13-fold when measured enzymatically and 25-fold when measured with urinary ketone dipsticks. Plasma acetoacetate was best predicted by breath acetone (R(2) = 0.70, P < 0.0001). Plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate was equally predicted by breath acetone and urinary acetoacetate (R(2) = 0.54, P = 0.0040). CONCLUSIONS: Breath acetone is as good a predictor of ketosis as is urinary acetoacetate. Breath acetone analysis is noninvasive and can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort to patients. As an indicator of ketosis in epilepsy patients consuming a ketogenic diet, breath acetone may be useful for understanding the mechanism of the diet, elucidating the importance of ketosis in seizure protection, and ultimately, enhancing the efficacy of the diet by improving patient m Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

How Diet Can Cause (or Help Fix) Bad Breath

Bad breath isn’t a life-threatening problem, but it’s socially embarrassing and it can make life pretty rough, especially if your job has some kind of social component. And even though it sometimes comes from poor oral hygiene, even people with totally solid brush/floss/mouthwash/tongue scraper routines can get breath problems, because not all bad breath is caused by germs in your mouth. Here’s a look at the relationship between diet and breath, including the infamous “keto breath,” but also including other factors like the bacterial population of your mouth and how different foods you eat can affect odor-causing bacteria. Diet and Breath The obvious connection between diet and breath is smelly foods, like garlic, coffee, and fish. Obviously, these foods do have an effect, but it’s temporary: you can brush your teeth and get rid of it. A harder problem is bad breath that persists even if you aren’t eating anything particularly smelly – clearly there’s something else going on here. This study goes over some of the causes of bad breath. In 90% of cases, the problem has something to do with the bacterial population of the mouth. The human mouth naturally plays host to a lot of different bacteria, just like the gut. Just like healthy gut flora, healthy mouth bacteria don’t cause problems, but if something goes wrong, various species of mouth bacteria can produce several different compounds that make your breath smell bad. The study also goes over some other related problems. For example, the inflammation involved in gingivitis and other inflammatory diseases can make the problem worse. Another problem is saliva. Saliva basically “washes” the mouth at regular intervals If you’re not making enough saliva for some reason, bacterial populations in the Continue reading >>

How To Eliminate Ketosis Breath

How To Eliminate Ketosis Breath

...that sometimes comes with living low carb! Some people complain they are plagued by a bad breath smell when their body shifts into ketosis when living a low-carb lifestyle. Let’s look at what causes that to happen and then what you may do to try to eliminate the unpleasant bad breath associated with it. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn’t have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you’re healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don’t normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. ~WebMD.com As you can see it is very natural for this to happen and if anything you should look upon this phenomenon, along with “Atkins flu” as a good sign that your body has made the shift from burning carbs to burning fat for fuel! That means you are going to start losing weight! However it is easy for people to make the wrong assumption that since you have bad breath you have poor oral hygiene and consequences can be devastating on one’s social, personal and professional life. Unfortunately, no matter how much you brush your teeth, floss or scrape your tongue this will not help to reduce the ketosis breath smell. There is no perfect ketosis breath cure, although you can try to reduce how noticeable it is. The best way to reduce the bad ketosis breath is to use mouthwashes or chew gum regularly. Be sure to check the nutritional label on each to ensure that you are not adding a bunch of extra carbs to your diet! Others try the natural approach and chew on herbs like Italian parsley, which they swea Continue reading >>

Get Rid Of Keto Breath

Get Rid Of Keto Breath

How to Get Rid of Bad Breath Caused by Ketogenic Diets Did you know that there is a connection between certain diets and bad breath? And no, this isn't just referring to eating lots of onions and garic! Low carbohydrate/high protein or high fat diets, such as the Keto, Paleo, South Beach, and Atkins diet, can actually cause bad breath. This foul smelling breath problem is referred to as "Keto Breath" in many communities. Diets that put the body in ketosis, while excellent for losing weight, may leave your mouth with an offensive taste and odor. Why do Ketogenic Diets cause this "Dragon Breath"? There are two main reasons that a low-carb/high-protein diet causes bad breath: 1. Volatile Sulfur Compounds (Sulfur gases): There are billions of bacteria living in your mouth at any given moment. These bacteria consume protein from the foods you eat and produce sulfur gas, or bad breath as a waste product. By eating high protein content and fewer carbs, your are introducing more protein for bacteria to eat and this allows them to produce additional bad breath. 2. Ketosis The main goal of ketogenic diets is to minimize the consumption of carbohydrates by replacing them with healthy fats and proteins. This method is commonly used in order to achieve timely weight loss. Typically, the body uses glucose from carbohydrates as a source of energy. However, on very low carb diets, the body is instead forced to burn fat for energy. This burning of fat is known as ketosis and produces ketones that are expelled from the body through urine or exhalation. In excessive amounts these ketones can produce a foul smell and create ketosis breath, or keto breath. How do I stop it? Luckily, there are multiple measures you can take to help prevent keto breath while on low-carb/high-fat and high-prot Continue reading >>

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

On measuring Ketones. Like many people, when I first started a Ketogenic diet in early 2014 I bought the Ketostix and just couldn’t wait to see the color change. And change it did! It was neat, and it provided motivation for me to continue. Eventually, I got a blood meter, a breath meter and spent lots of time (and money) testing ketones. Between a Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer, as well as dozens of blood ketone test strips, I’ve probably spent well over $500 testing ketones. The main thing I learned from my extensive ketone testing regimen is that the results vary widely and there’s little application to my goals. Eventually, I stopped testing and here are several reasons why: 1. Burning fatty acids from fat is the main benefit of a ketogenic diet On a ketogenic diet, some of the brain’s energetic demand is fueled by ketones, but the heart, muscles, etc. are fueled by fatty acids. Most of the energy we utilize both at rest and at sub-maximal exertion on a ketogenic diet is fatty acid, not ketones. Quoting Dr. Ron Rosedale on chasing ketones at the Keto Summit: “I don’t want people to have the mindset that it’s the ketones that are the benefit of the diet. They are a beneficial side effect, but the main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids from fat. The more fatty acids from fat you are burning, the less glucose you need to burn. And that’s really where you are getting the benefit…So ketones are great but the term ketogenic diet indicating that the diet is so good because you are generating all these ketones is a misinterpretation of the benefit. The main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids, and as a side effect of burning fatty acids you are producing ketones that your body can burn too!” 2. Urine Ketones aka “peetones” are ridic Continue reading >>

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ketosis Breath: Causes & Solutions For Bad Breath

Ultra-low carb diets have grown in popularity over recent years. These so-called “keto diets” aim to facilitate rapid weight loss, through the consumption of minimal carbohydrates. Keto diets have become understandably popular on account of their rapid results, together with the practical benefits of consuming healthy volumes of the right foods, making hunger less of a problem than on more typical calorie-controlled diets. However keto diets are not without their issues, and one of the most common complaints comes in the form of “ketosis breath”. Quite simply many individuals making use of very low carb diets suffer from pungent and unpleasant breath. The question is what can be done to counteract such a problem? The Cause of Ketosis Breath In order to learn how to get rid of keto breath, we first need to understand why breath can smell under such a regime. As it turns out there are two potential reasons(1), both of which can operate independently, or in conjunction. Ketone Release The most typical source of energy used by the body is glucose. This is typically derived from carbohydrates, where the digestive system breaks down complex sugars into simple glucose molecules. On very low carb diets, however, the body is unable to utilize such a fuel. Instead, the liver utilizes the fat present in the body as an energy source, producing “ketones” in the process(2). This is known as “ketosis” – and is the process from where keto diets get their unusual name. These ketone bodies come in three common forms; acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetone(3). In large quantities they are removed from the body in the urine or through exhalation. Ketones can have quite a characteristic smell; they often make the dieter’s breath smell quite sweet and fruity, quit Continue reading >>

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Breath Acetone Is A Reliable Indicator Of Ketosis In Adults Consuming Ketogenic Meals1,2,3

Abstract Background: Ketogenic diets are used therapeutically to treat intractable seizures. Clinically, it appears that the maintenance of ketosis is crucial to the efficacy of the diet in ameliorating seizures. To understand how ketosis and seizure protection are related, a reliable, noninvasive measure of ketosis that can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort is needed. Objective: The objective was to determine which index, breath acetone or urinary acetoacetate, is more strongly related to the plasma ketones acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate. Design: After fasting overnight for 12 h, 12 healthy adults consumed 4 ketogenic meals over 12 h. Blood, breath, and urine samples were collected hourly. Blood was analyzed for plasma acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate, breath for acetone, and urine for acetoacetate. Results: By the end of the 12-h dietary treatment, plasma acetoacetate, plasma β-hydroxybutyrate, and breath acetone had increased 3.5-fold, whereas urinary acetoacetate increased 13-fold when measured enzymatically and 25-fold when measured with urinary ketone dipsticks. Plasma acetoacetate was best predicted by breath acetone (R2 = 0.70, P < 0.0001). Plasma β-hydroxybutyrate was equally predicted by breath acetone and urinary acetoacetate (R2 = 0.54, P = 0.0040). Conclusions: Breath acetone is as good a predictor of ketosis as is urinary acetoacetate. Breath acetone analysis is noninvasive and can be performed frequently with minimal discomfort to patients. As an indicator of ketosis in epilepsy patients consuming a ketogenic diet, breath acetone may be useful for understanding the mechanism of the diet, elucidating the importance of ketosis in seizure protection, and ultimately, enhancing the efficacy of the diet by improving patient monitoring. I Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis – Quantitative

Nutritional Ketosis – Quantitative

New Rapid Breath Test for Ketosis – Results on your Mobile Device in < 3 minutes! The KetoChek™ Breath Ketone Test is a rapid and convenient way to accurately measure ketones to determine if you are in a state of nutritional ketosis, or “fat-burning”. KetoChek™ does not require blood draws or inconvenient urine samples, just your breath! Accurate results correlate directly with blood ketone levels and are a more reliable indicator of ketosis than urine ketone tests. Health & Wellness Professionals: Support ketogenic diet programs within your practice, while enhancing your practice revenue by testing with KetoChek™ as part of every ketogenic diet program! Quantitative results read, interpreted, and delivered via the innovative BreathScan Lync™ reader*, and sent directly to your mobile device via the free BreathScan™ mobile app! Takes less than 3 minutes! Highly accurate: results closely correlated to the benchmark blood-based ketone testing Facilitates frequent testing and data tracking to monitor if you are currently in a fat-burning ketogenic state Uses patented MPC™ Biosensor technology Small, hand-held disposable cartridge design – test anywhere! (only 5 1/4" long) * KetoChek™ cartridges require the use of the BreathScan Lync™ reader. Click for more information on the BreathScan Lync™ Note: KetoChek™ is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. KetoChek™ is a general wellness product intended to measure (quantitatively) indicators of nutritional ketosis in the exhaled breath of humans. It can be used to promote, track, and/or encourage choice, such as the use of nutritional supplements, diet and exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. General wellness products do not require FDA clearance. The intended use statements Continue reading >>

The Science Behind The Technology

The Science Behind The Technology

For seven years, the LEVL team has been developing a sensor that reliably measures your acetone concentration and calculates fat burn, before you even step on a scale. Our team has leveraged half a century of proven breath science research into one device that seamlessly connects to your mobile device. Now you have real-time, easy-to-access information that allows you to monitor your fat loss. HOW LEVL WORKS WITH THE BODY LEVL clinical scientist Joe Anderson, Ph.D. explains how the measurement of breath acetone offers insights into the body’s fat burning capabilities. HOW DOES MY BODY BURN FAT? When the body is burning fat for energy, it is in a state called ketosis. During ketosis, the body generates molecules called ketones, one of which is acetone. Because of its small size, acetone appears in our exhaled breath as an indicator of fat burn. That’s where the LEVL device comes in. We’ve developed a sensor that can detect trace amounts of acetone in your breath. This makes monitoring whether or not your body is burning fat easy and predictable. HOW DOES LEVL WORK? Previous clinical research demonstrates a correlation between the amount of acetone detected in the breath and body fat burned, giving you a reliable indicator of fat loss. LEVL is designed to detect trace amounts of acetone in your breath when your body is burning fat. Simply breathe into LEVL. Your breath is captured and analyzed by our groundbreaking nanosensor, providing you with an instant measurement of your body’s acetone concentration. THE SCALE ISN’T MOVING. HOW DO I KNOW IF I’M BURNING FAT? Body weight is a combination of several factors: water, muscle, and fat. It can be deeply frustrating to rely on a traditional scale to detect fat loss. Most scales just measure overall body weight wit Continue reading >>

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