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Ketosis Blood Test Results

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Go to: Methods The KetoPerformance study with its before-and-after comparison design was registered at germanctr.de as DRKS00009605 and took place from February to June 2016. Exclusion criteria included underweight, obesity, kidney stones, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and any fatty acid-metabolism disorders. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Commission of the Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg (494/14) and all subjects signed a written consent form. Twelve of the 42 subjects from the KetoPerformance study could be recruited for the present substudy. Experimental design and dietary intervention The experimental intervention consisted of a KD without caloric restriction lasting 6 weeks with a previous preparation period including detailed instructions during teaching classes and individual counselling by a dietitian. The subjects were free to follow a KD according to their personal preferences but were advised to reach a ratio by weight of approximately 1.8:1 fat to carbohydrate and protein combined, yielding a diet with 80, 15, and 5 % of total energy intake from fat, protein and carbohydrate, respectively. During the KD intervention's sixth week, our substudy subjects were instructed to measure urine and blood ketone concentrations at regular intervals in as close proximity as possible during a 24-h period from 07:00 to 07:00 in the morning. During the day (07:00 till 22:00) blood and urinary ketones were measured every full hour and every three hours, respectively. During the night, blood and urinary ketones were measured once at 03:00. In total blood and urine and ketones were measured 18 and 8 times, respectively, and were recorded in a table sheet. Subjects were asked to drink 400 ml of water every 3 h during the day to ensure sufficient urination and to Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood With A Home Ketone Meter

How To Test Your Blood With A Home Ketone Meter

testing is used by people with diabetes and by people on a ketogenic diet. You can test your urine or your blood for ketones. But because urine testing is not as accurate, the American Diabetes Association recommends blood ketone testing with a ketone meter as the preferable method. If you have diabetes, you should discuss home blood ketone testing with your doctor to learn whether it is recommended in your case and when you should perform the testing. Ketone testing is particularly important during periods of illness. Blood Ketone Meters for Testing at Home You will need a blood ketone meter and a kit that include the lancet pen and ketone test strips. These meters also will read blood glucose test strips, and both will download their results to your computer. Other brands and models may be available, including: Precision Xtra: This meter from Abbott Diabetes Care can store up to 450 measurements and will display your blood glucose averages over different time periods. You need to enter a code to switch from glucose testing to ketone testing. Users seem happier with the Precision brand, and researchers find it to be the more accurate. The strips require 1.5 microliters of blood. It also features a backlit display. Nova Max Plus: This meter from Nova Biomedical is often provided free with the purchase of two boxes of test strips. You don't have to enter a code to switch it from blood glucose to ketone testing; it does that automatically when you insert a ketone test strip. If you are using it primarily for blood glucose, it will remind you to test for ketones if your blood sugar level is 250 mg/dL or higher. The test strips for the Nova Max are less expensive but also flimsier and give more error messages, requiring retesting. The strips require less blood than the Prec Continue reading >>

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

Why I Stopped Testing My Ketones On A Ketogenic Diet

On measuring Ketones. Like many people, when I first started a Ketogenic diet in early 2014 I bought the Ketostix and just couldn’t wait to see the color change. And change it did! It was neat, and it provided motivation for me to continue. Eventually, I got a blood meter, a breath meter and spent lots of time (and money) testing ketones. Between a Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer, as well as dozens of blood ketone test strips, I’ve probably spent well over $500 testing ketones. The main thing I learned from my extensive ketone testing regimen is that the results vary widely and there’s little application to my goals. Eventually, I stopped testing and here are several reasons why: 1. Burning fatty acids from fat is the main benefit of a ketogenic diet On a ketogenic diet, some of the brain’s energetic demand is fueled by ketones, but the heart, muscles, etc. are fueled by fatty acids. Most of the energy we utilize both at rest and at sub-maximal exertion on a ketogenic diet is fatty acid, not ketones. Quoting Dr. Ron Rosedale on chasing ketones at the Keto Summit: “I don’t want people to have the mindset that it’s the ketones that are the benefit of the diet. They are a beneficial side effect, but the main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids from fat. The more fatty acids from fat you are burning, the less glucose you need to burn. And that’s really where you are getting the benefit…So ketones are great but the term ketogenic diet indicating that the diet is so good because you are generating all these ketones is a misinterpretation of the benefit. The main benefit is that you are burning fatty acids, and as a side effect of burning fatty acids you are producing ketones that your body can burn too!” 2. Urine Ketones aka “peetones” are ridic Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Ketone Test Strips

Ketosis & Ketone Test Strips

Discuss this article! By Doreen EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT KETOSIS ... 1. What are ketones? 2. How will ketosis help me to lose weight? 3. But, isn't ketosis dangerous? 4. How do the ketone test strips work, and where do I get them? 5. I'm following Induction strictly; why won't my strips turn purple? 6. Will I lose weight faster if the strips show dark purple all the time? 7. Does caffeine affect ketosis? 8. Will drinking alcohol affect ketosis? What are ketones? Ketones are a normal and efficient source of fuel and energy for the human body. They are produced by the liver from fatty acids, which result from the breakdown of body fat in response to the absence of glucose/sugar. In a ketogenic diet, such as Atkins ... or diets used for treating epilepsy in children, the tiny amounts of glucose required for some select functions can be met by consuming a minimum amount of carbs - or can be manufactured in the liver from PROTEIN. When your body is producing ketones, and using them for fuel, this is called "ketosis". How will ketosis help me to lose weight? Most reducing diets restrict calorie intake, so you lose weight but some of that is fat and some of it is lean muscle tissue as well. Less muscle means slowed metabolism, which makes losing weight more difficult and gaining it back all too easy. Ketosis will help you to lose FAT. Being in ketosis means that your body's primary source of energy is fat (in the form of ketones). When you consume adequate protein as well, there's no need for the body to break down its muscle tissue. Ketosis also tends to accelerate fat loss --- once the liver converts fat to ketones, it can't be converted back to fat, and so is excreted. But, isn't ketosis dangerous? Being in ketosis by following a low carbohydrate diet is Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing

Ketone Testing

Tweet Ketone testing is a key part of type 1 diabetes management as it helps to prevent a dangerous short term complication, ketoacidosis, from occurring. If you have type 1 diabetes, it is recommended that you have ketone testing supplies on your prescription. Ketone testing may also be useful in people with other types of diabetes that are dependent upon insulin. Why test for ketones? Ketones are produced by the body as an alternative source of energy to sugar. The body produces ketones by breaking down fats, this process is known as ketosis. Ketones may be produced as part of weight loss, however, it’s important for people with diabetes on insulin to note that ketones can be produced when the body has insufficient insulin. When the body has too little insulin, it means that cells of the body cannot take in enough sugar from the blood. To compensate for this, the body will start to break down fat to provide ketones. However, if a high level of ketones is produced, this can cause the blood to become acidic which can lead to illness and even potential danger to organs if not treated in time. This state is referred to as diabetic ketoacidosis. Where can I get ketone testing kits and sensors? The most accurate way of testing for ketones is to use a meter that measures blood ketone levels. The following blood glucose meters are able to test blood ketone levels in addition to blood glucose levels: Abbott - FreeStyle Optium Neo Menarini - GlucoMen LX Plus If you take insulin, you should be able to get these prescribed by your GP. You can also test urine for ketone levels, however, urine ketone testing is not as accurate as blood ketone testing as the levels of ketones in the urine will usually only reflect a level of up to a few hours previously. When to test for ketones? Continue reading >>

Keto Blood Work Results: Before And After

Keto Blood Work Results: Before And After

A string of videos I posted on Instagram Stories, highlighting the changes I’ve seen in blood work from before keto to now (3 years later). Part of the process of moving into the RV has been scanning all documents and images so that they take up less space in our life. I came across a stack of blood work from before I was keto to a couple of weeks ago and thought it would be fun to share the results with you. The following video was created on Instagram Stories a couple of weeks ago. In it, it highlights the changes I’ve experienced since going keto July 2014. It’s so cool to see that my body continues to heal and adjust the longer I eat this way. Resources… Many of you have been asking… Where did you get your testing done? I went to my regular ol’ doctor’s office and requested a bundle of testing. Testing bundles vary from provider to provider. If you want a list of the specific tests that I recommend, check out chapter 16 in Fat Fueled What kind of blood test did you ask for? Total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol, free T3 and T4, estradiol, and vitamin B12 are the tests mentioned in this video, but I was tested for oodles more than that— You can find the entire list in chapter 16 of Fat Fueled How do your test results translate to US values? If my test results are not in your preferred unit of measurement, this conversion tool should help you interpret things Continue reading >>

Why Am I Getting Low Ketone Readings On A Ketogenic Diet?

Why Am I Getting Low Ketone Readings On A Ketogenic Diet?

75 Comments Even having finished and printed The Keto Reset, the quest for deeper understanding continues. I keep researching, thinking, revisiting, and discussing the science and practice of ketosis. My writing partner, Brad Kearns, and I maintain a running dialogue on all things keto. The latest conversation revolved around two very common questions or “problems” that keep coming up in the ketogenic community. Why do some people on a keto diet blow high numbers of ketones while others eating the same way blow low numbers? and this one… Is ketosis glycogen-sparing or glycogen-inhibiting? I won’t offer definitive answers fit to etch into stone. I will offer my exploration of the research, some educated speculation, and actionable advice you can ruminate on. And by all means get back to me with your take on the questions and my explorations, please. Dialogue is essential to understanding. Why do some people on ketogenic diets produce low ketone readings when they test? One theory is that some keto-adapted people are so adapted to producing and burning ketones that they don’t leave any extra to spill into the urine and breath. They make only as many as they can use and their cells gobble up almost every ketone they produce. Under this argument, low ketone numbers on a ketogenic diet are a reliable sign of full ketone adaptation. This sounds plausible, but I haven’t seen any empirical evidence that it’s the case. Another theory is that the keto-adapted have built so much fat-burning metabolic machinery in their muscles that they can burn free fatty acids directly and don’t require much additional fuel from ketones. They make enough ketones to fuel the brain, since our brain can’t run on fatty acids directly, but your muscles no longer require as many. Man Continue reading >>

Importance Of A Blood Test Before Starting A Protein Ketogenic Diet

Importance Of A Blood Test Before Starting A Protein Ketogenic Diet

*Corresponding author: Joaquín Pérez-Guisado Rosa, MD, Ph.D, Department of Genetic, University of Córdoba, Campus of Rabanales, Córdoba, Spain E-mail: @ Citation: Rosa JPG (2015) Importance of a Blood Test Before Starting a Protein Ketogenic Diet. Obes Control Ther 2(2): 1-2. DOI: As we all know, obesity is not only an aesthetic problem, but in developed countries, it is a disease that is reaching epidemic proportions and is associated with a multitude of medical conditions. Few examples of scientifically proven and its association with, are given below: 1. A lower life expectancy 2. A higher incidence with worse prognosis and evolution in different types of cancer such as the esophagus, stomach, colon, breast, endometrium, ovary, kidney and pancreas. 3. Cardiovascular problems or diseases associated such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, phlebitis and venous thromboembolic disease. 4. Endocrine problems where resistance to insulin, either directly or indirectly plays a key role, as the metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose, carbohydrate intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and polycystic ovary syndrome. 5. Both male and female infertility and menstrual disorders 6. Orthopedic problems such as osteoarthritis. 7. Hyperuricemia and gout. 8. Chronic kidney disease due to glomerular damage. 9. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia. 10. Vision problems such as glaucoma, macular degeneration and cataracts 11. Liver problems such as gallstones and liver steatosis, closely related to insulin resistance. 12. Respiratory problems such as dyspnea, sleep apnea and asthma. 13. Psychological problems such as low self-esteem, depression and anxiety. A protein ketogenic diet is a ketogenic diet based on proteins. I have treated successf Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

A common misconception is that because ketogenic diets are high in fat, they must increase cholesterol in your body and clog your arteries. However, much of the recent research shines light on how low-carb diets can optimize your cholesterol levels and in fact improve your heart health. Here we show the most up-to-date research on how different types of cholesterol impact the body and how the ketogenic diet can be a useful tool in maintaining a robust cardiovascular system. Cutting through the Fat: What are Lipids and Cholesterol? Before we can examine the research, we need to understand the roles fat, cholesterol, and carrier molecules called lipoproteins play in the body. Fats, also known as lipids, are a diverse group of molecules with a “non-polar” characteristic that repels water. This means that you if you put a fat such as oil or grease in water they will not mix. In the human body, fats are most commonly found in the bloodstream in one of two forms. The first is triglycerides, a fatty acid that stores energy for later use. These long molecules can be broken down into other fatty acids and glycerol to create fuel for the body. Glycerol can further be broken down into forms of glucose. Elevated levels of triglycerides in your blood can increase your risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular illnesses, and other life-threatening diseases. [1] The other important class of lipids in the body is a waxy substance called cholesterol. These molecules have a variety of functions in your body such as building hormones including estrogen and testosterone, maintaining the integrity of cell membranes, and aiding in the absorption of vitamins. Your body produces all the cholesterol you need through the liver and other body cells. Cholesterol is also obtained by consuming Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Ketone Bodies (urine)

Does this test have other names? Ketone test, urine ketones What is this test? This test is used to check the level of ketones in your urine. Normally, your body burns sugar for energy. But if you have diabetes, you may not have enough insulin for the sugar in your bloodstream to be used for fuel. When this happens, your body burns fat instead and produces substances called ketones. The ketones end up in your blood and urine. It's normal to have a small amount of ketones in your body. But high ketone levels could result in serious illness or death. Checking for ketones keeps this from happening. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if you have a high level of blood sugar. People with high levels of blood sugar often have high ketone levels. If you have high blood sugar levels and type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important to check your ketone levels. People without diabetes can also have ketones in the urine if their body is using fat for fuel instead of glucose. This can happen with chronic vomiting, extreme exercise, low-carbohydrate diets, or eating disorders. Checking your ketones is especially important if you have diabetes and: Your blood sugar goes above 300 mg/dL You abuse alcohol You have diarrhea You stop eating carbohydrates like rice and bread You're pregnant You've been fasting You've been vomiting You have an infection Your healthcare provider may order this test, or have you test yourself, if you: Urinate frequently Are often quite thirsty or tired Have muscle aches Have shortness of breath or trouble breathing Have nausea or vomiting Are confused Have a fruity smell to your breath What other tests might I have along with this test? Your healthcare provider may also check for ketones in your blood if you have high levels of ketones in your urine Continue reading >>

An Inconvenient Truth About Ketone Levels

An Inconvenient Truth About Ketone Levels

Too many keto "gurus" make bold, one-size-fits-all claims about ketone levels. Learn how to separate truth from myth! If you've been following a ketogenic diet for a while, or spent any time frequenting forums and blogs dedicated to this way of eating, you've probably figured out by now that nutritionist JJ Virgin nailed it: The human body is not a bank account, where you can make precise deposits or withdrawals and know exactly what your balance will be afterward. If only it were that simple! The success stories and frustrated rants on various keto platforms across the internet point to something that should be fairly obvious: People are different. (Shocking, I know!) Two people can eat the exact same number of calories, in the exact same macronutrient ratios, and even eat the same exact foods, yet have completely different ketone levels, energy, and fat-loss results. The widespread existence of keto myths makes adapting and thriving more difficult than it should be for newcomers to keto. Learn the truth about these four common keto myths to calm your ketone (or lack thereof)-induced stress! Myth 1 Higher Ketones Lead to More (or Faster) Fat Loss If there is one myth I wish would die a fiery, painful death, it's this one. Why? Ketone production is the result of lipolysis (the breakdown of fat)—not a direct cause of fat loss. This applies to blood-, breath-, and urine-ketone levels. To further refute this erroneous claim, think about this: It's possible to have elevated ketones and gain body fat. Trust me, you could mainline mayonnaise and nothing else to the tune of 8,000 calories a day and be in ketosis. I wouldn't place a bet on you leaning out much, though. Fat loss doesn't come from being in deep ketosis; it comes from choosing the right foods in the right amount Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

You’ve probably seen dozens of headlines about the ketogenic diet by now, which has made its way into popular culture largely by celebrities and supermodels giving the long-standing fad diet a repeated stamp of approval. Is this the diet to follow if you have diabetes? Studies suggest the answer isn’t so simple. Some science shows its meal plan may be helpful, while other research, like one study published in September 2016 in Nutrients, highlights the importance of whole grains in the diets of people with diabetes — a restricted food category in the ketogenic diet. While the keto diet can offer many potential benefits for diabetes management, following it requires pretty serious commitment. So take a beat before you take the plunge — and consider these questions that can help you and your medical team determine if it’s right for you: How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work Exactly? There’s a good reason the ketogenic diet is also referred to as a low-carb, high-fat diet. Indeed, following the ketogenic diet means reducing carbohydrate intake to typically less than 50 grams (g) of carbohydrates per day, while increasing fat and protein intake, according to a review published in August 2013 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. To put that into perspective, an individual on an average, non-restricted diet can easily eat more carbohydrates than that in one typical meal — for instance, a turkey, cheese, and veggie sandwich on whole-grain bread with a small, 1 ounce (oz) bag of classic potato chips would come in at around 51 g of carbs. These dietary changes drive down insulin levels, eventually leading your body into a state of ketosis, during which it is burning fat rather than carbohydrates. What Are Some of the Potential Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet for Continue reading >>

A Real Keto Os Review With Blood Test Results!

A Real Keto Os Review With Blood Test Results!

So I am sure you have heard of KETO OS by Pruvit product. The ketone product that gets you into ketosis in 30 minutes*. Just like you, I went to their site and read all the reviews and learned more about the product. Yes! even I did get excited about this product after reading all the great things it can do. Fat loss – especially in the abdominal area* Break Fat Loss Plateaus* Increased Focus and Mental Clarity (no brain fog)* Reduced Hunger (appetite suppression) Improved Gut Health* Reduced Inflammation* Fast and Sustained Energy – no crashes* Strength Gain* Better Sleep* Clearer and brighter skin* Ok, that is pretty damn impressive but we all know that those are the core benefits of being in ketosis. As well it’s just overall great for the mind and body – and on top of that this drink gets you in ketosis in 30 minutes?* KETO//OS has a certificate of analysis for purity, consistence and efficacy. But before I recommend or support a product to my clients – I needed to test this for myself. WHY WAS I SKEPTICAL (BEFORE TRYING IT) I was VERY skeptical about “exogenous ketones” which are basically ketones that your body isn’t producing – but rather you’re consuming. I was also skeptical about how they “measure” ketosis in 1 hour – they mention to use KetoStix. Anyone that knows anything about measuring ketones knows that is a complete bullshit (excuse my language) way of measuring ketones. Too many outside factors affect those readings like: more water will give you a lighter reading vs less water will give you a darker reading due to the dilution/saturation of the water to ketone ratio. The only TRUE way of measuring ketones levels, is with a glucometer (blood meter) using ketone blood sticks. Before we get into my test and review of KETO OS, che Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis represents a state of the organism characterized by the controlled and regulated production of ketone bodies in the blood via various metabolic processes. During very low carbohydrate intake, reduced insulin levels leads to a reduction in lipogenesis and fat accumulation. After several days of fasting, glucose reserves become insufficient both for normal fat oxidation and for the proper functioning of the brain. As the central nervous system is not able to use fatty acids for its energy because they cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, it normally utilizes glucose. Low carbohydrate intake forces the brain to find alternative energy source derived from the overproduction of acetyl coenzyme A (CoA). The production of ketone bodies in a process called ketogenesis ensues. Ketosis is a completely physiological mechanism and it needs to be differentiated from the pathological ketoacidosis seen in type 1 diabetes. Physiological ketosis that arises as a result of ketogenic diets is characterized by ketone bodies in blood reaching a maximum level of 8 mmol/l with no change in pH, compared to uncontrolled diabetic ketoacidosis where their level can exceed 20 mmol/l and result in a lower blood pH. Ketone body metabolism The term “ketone bodies” refers to three specific compounds: acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate (or beta-hydroxybutyric acid). The circulating levels of ketone bodies depend both on their rate of production (i.e. ketogenesis) and their rate of utilization (i.e. ketolysis). They are of vital importance to the brain, which is unable to derive energy from other sources when blood glucose levels are low. In healthy adults, the liver is able to produce 185 grams of ketone bodies each day. The main ketone body produced is acetoacetate, but the pr Continue reading >>

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