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Ketosis Blood Test

Blood Ketone Meter

Blood Ketone Meter

Living a ketogenic lifestyle is one of the best decisions a person could make. This lifestyle allows the body to burn It's own stored fat which is stored in the body muscles as glycogen to produce energy as opposed to using glucose/sugar . It not only improves your health but also helps you lose the unwanted extra pounds. It can be very difficult to estimate the amount of ketones in the blood by keeping track of the low carbohydrates foods you take. Ketones can be measured using different methods. One can either use a urine test where you use urine sticks that turn a range of different colors once ketones are present. The other method is the use of blood strips and a blood ketone meter that is used to measure the ketone levels. A blood ketone meter is a device that is used to measure the amount of Ketones in the blood and it works the same way as a glucose meter.The latter is accurate and can help you to keep track of your ketone levels and also monitor the type food you take if you are leading a ketogenic lifestyle.That is why it is highly advisable to use a blood Ketone meter to be able to measure the ketone levels in your blood. A blood ketone meter is a small electronic device that simply tests the amount of Ketones in one's blood and the direct readings can be easily read on a digital display. It also gives accurate and quantitative assessments that are reliable to keep check of ones ketone levels. The blood ketone meter can be easily used at home since it is very simple to use. All you need to know is the acceptable ketone levels in a healthy person. There are various quantities that either indicate low or high presence of ketones in the blood. High ketone levels are indicated by a measurement above 3.0 mmol/L of ketones ,1-6 to 2.9 mmol/L for optimal ketone level Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways to Measure Your Ketones A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. Research has demonstrated that this nutrition plan improves insulin sensitivity and reduces inflammation throughout the body. This leads to greater fat metabolism and muscle development as well as a reduced risk of chronic disease. (1, 2). I get asked all the time how to measure the state of ketosis. There are several major ways and we will discuss those in this article. Measuring Your Ketones There are three types of ketone bodies: Acetone, Acetoacetate and Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB). Each of these three can be tested as acetone is a ketone released through the breath, acetoacetate is a ketone released through urine and BHB is (although not technically a ketone it acts like a ketone) in the blood stream and used by the cells for energy. 1. Blood Ketone Meter This measures BHB and is considered to be the most accurate way to measure ketone bodies. These have the ability to determine the ketone level in your blood precisely but they are also pricey and invasive. Personally, I freak out every time I have to prick my finger!! The Precision Xtra blood glucose and ketone meter is a good buy at $28-$30. The expensive part is the ketone test strips here which can cost $4 each. If you are looking at testing yourself every day it is going to cost you $120 a month and the $30 meter. Here is a starter kit you can get on Amazon Most people will enter into a light nutritional ketosis (between 0.5-1.0 mmol/L on the meter) within two or three days. It typically takes Continue reading >>

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

Fresh Cow Ketosis Tests Pay Back Big

Fresh Cow Ketosis Tests Pay Back Big

A drop of blood is all that’s needed Editor’s note: This is the first of a six-part series on transition cow management that will run in 2015. When it comes to fresh cow health, an ounce of prevention can result in pounds more milk, fewer displaced abomasums (DAs) and less culling. All of it adds up to potentially thousands of dollars saved each year. And it all can be had with the use of a simple, easy-to-use blood test of cows in your fresh pen. Most dairy farmers, unless they routinely test for subclinical ketosis, are blissfully unaware of how prevalent the disease is in their herds. But work in New York and Wisconsin herds done by veterinarian researchers Jessica McArt, Cornell University, and Gary Oetzel, University of Wisconsin, suggest subclinical ketosis is challenging fresh cows through early transition. The study, done during the summer of 2010, involved 1,800 cows in four herds—two each in New York and Wisconsin. Nearly 45% of cows were subclincally ketotic during the first two weeks after calving. The good news is subclinical cows that were treated responded well, averaging 1.5 lb. more milk per day, had fewer DAs and were culled less frequently. For every 100 fresh cows tested twice between three and nine days in milk, the net economic return was roughly $1,200. What makes all this possible are easy-to-use test strips requiring just a drop of blood from the tail vein. A very small amount of blood is added to the end of the test strip and then read by a meter. The Cornell and Wisconsin vet-erinarians have found the Precision Xtra ketone meter from Abbott gives excellent results with no additional calibration needed from the human system. The meter measures whole blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA). A reading of 1.2 mmol/L or more indicates subclinical k Continue reading >>

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Measuring Ketosis: What Are Keto Sticks And Keto Strips?

Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver breaks down fat to produce ketones. Ketones, on a ketogenic diet, are the primary fuel source for the body. If you’re new to the ketogenic diet and you still have questions, consider reading our Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Keto > There are three main ways to measure the ketones in your body, all of which have their advantages and disadvantages. The most common ways to measure are: Blood Ketone Meter. Very accurate but the strips are extremely expensive. Breath Ketone Meters. More accurate than the urine strips, but can sometimes vary in accuracy. Cheaper than blood strips in the long-run. Urine Stricks. This will answer the question “Am I in ketosis?” but will not provide an accurate measure of blood ketones. Scroll down to read a more in-depth analysis of each, and what we recommend for you. Measuring Ketones with Urine Sticks Urine sticks will always be the cheapest and easiest way to measure ketosis. For beginners, this should cover everything you need – there is no point in getting more complex blood strips so early on when you are still trying to understand the nuances of a ketogenic diet. Ultimately, keto sticks are very easy to use – you hold the sticks in your urine stream for a few seconds, and within 10-15 seconds you should notice a color change in the strip (if you are in ketosis). The color of the stick typically is measured in red: light pink being low in ketone production and dark purple being high in ketone production. While keto sticks can be ideal for a general answer to the question “Am I in ketosis?”, they aren’t precise with their accuracy. They measure the acetoacetate in your urine, which is an unused ketone by the body. As you get deeper into ketosis and your body adapts, your b Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing

Ketone Testing

Tweet Ketone testing is a key part of type 1 diabetes management as it helps to prevent a dangerous short term complication, ketoacidosis, from occurring. If you have type 1 diabetes, it is recommended that you have ketone testing supplies on your prescription. Ketone testing may also be useful in people with other types of diabetes that are dependent upon insulin. Why test for ketones? Ketones are produced by the body as an alternative source of energy to sugar. The body produces ketones by breaking down fats, this process is known as ketosis. Ketones may be produced as part of weight loss, however, it’s important for people with diabetes on insulin to note that ketones can be produced when the body has insufficient insulin. When the body has too little insulin, it means that cells of the body cannot take in enough sugar from the blood. To compensate for this, the body will start to break down fat to provide ketones. However, if a high level of ketones is produced, this can cause the blood to become acidic which can lead to illness and even potential danger to organs if not treated in time. This state is referred to as diabetic ketoacidosis. Where can I get ketone testing kits and sensors? The most accurate way of testing for ketones is to use a meter that measures blood ketone levels. The following blood glucose meters are able to test blood ketone levels in addition to blood glucose levels: Abbott - FreeStyle Optium Neo Menarini - GlucoMen LX Plus If you take insulin, you should be able to get these prescribed by your GP. You can also test urine for ketone levels, however, urine ketone testing is not as accurate as blood ketone testing as the levels of ketones in the urine will usually only reflect a level of up to a few hours previously. When to test for ketones? Continue reading >>

[blood Sugar And Ketone Body Content In Cows With Clinical Ketosis].

[blood Sugar And Ketone Body Content In Cows With Clinical Ketosis].

Abstract The investigation confirms hypoglycaemia and hyperketonaemia as typical for ketosis. A reverse correlation has been found between the level of blood sugar and that of ketone bodies. The changes observed in both blood sugars and ketones have not been shown to manifest any definite relation to the feeding regime, which may not have been perfectly balanced but has supplied metabolizable energy and digestible protein for maintenance and production in excess. Five-day starving of freshly calved, clinically normal cows may cause a dependable drop of the blood sugar level and rise of the ketone bodies to an extent that vary from that observed in ketosis-affected cows showing no clinical picture characteristic of the disease. The glycaemic reaction observed with the glucose-tolerance and the adrenaline tests shows that there is no apparent differences in the carbohydrate metabolism and the glycosynthetic capacity of the liver between diseased and clinically normal animals. The use of the two tests as auxiliary clinical methods has not been effective in registering the deviations in the status of the adrenal cortex and the pituitary gland. Continue reading >>

How To Test Your Blood With A Home Ketone Meter

How To Test Your Blood With A Home Ketone Meter

testing is used by people with diabetes and by people on a ketogenic diet. You can test your urine or your blood for ketones. But because urine testing is not as accurate, the American Diabetes Association recommends blood ketone testing with a ketone meter as the preferable method. If you have diabetes, you should discuss home blood ketone testing with your doctor to learn whether it is recommended in your case and when you should perform the testing. Ketone testing is particularly important during periods of illness. Blood Ketone Meters for Testing at Home You will need a blood ketone meter and a kit that include the lancet pen and ketone test strips. These meters also will read blood glucose test strips, and both will download their results to your computer. Other brands and models may be available, including: Precision Xtra: This meter from Abbott Diabetes Care can store up to 450 measurements and will display your blood glucose averages over different time periods. You need to enter a code to switch from glucose testing to ketone testing. Users seem happier with the Precision brand, and researchers find it to be the more accurate. The strips require 1.5 microliters of blood. It also features a backlit display. Nova Max Plus: This meter from Nova Biomedical is often provided free with the purchase of two boxes of test strips. You don't have to enter a code to switch it from blood glucose to ketone testing; it does that automatically when you insert a ketone test strip. If you are using it primarily for blood glucose, it will remind you to test for ketones if your blood sugar level is 250 mg/dL or higher. The test strips for the Nova Max are less expensive but also flimsier and give more error messages, requiring retesting. The strips require less blood than the Prec Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Go to: Methods The KetoPerformance study with its before-and-after comparison design was registered at germanctr.de as DRKS00009605 and took place from February to June 2016. Exclusion criteria included underweight, obesity, kidney stones, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and any fatty acid-metabolism disorders. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Commission of the Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg (494/14) and all subjects signed a written consent form. Twelve of the 42 subjects from the KetoPerformance study could be recruited for the present substudy. Experimental design and dietary intervention The experimental intervention consisted of a KD without caloric restriction lasting 6 weeks with a previous preparation period including detailed instructions during teaching classes and individual counselling by a dietitian. The subjects were free to follow a KD according to their personal preferences but were advised to reach a ratio by weight of approximately 1.8:1 fat to carbohydrate and protein combined, yielding a diet with 80, 15, and 5 % of total energy intake from fat, protein and carbohydrate, respectively. During the KD intervention's sixth week, our substudy subjects were instructed to measure urine and blood ketone concentrations at regular intervals in as close proximity as possible during a 24-h period from 07:00 to 07:00 in the morning. During the day (07:00 till 22:00) blood and urinary ketones were measured every full hour and every three hours, respectively. During the night, blood and urinary ketones were measured once at 03:00. In total blood and urine and ketones were measured 18 and 8 times, respectively, and were recorded in a table sheet. Subjects were asked to drink 400 ml of water every 3 h during the day to ensure sufficient urination and to Continue reading >>

When And How Should You Measure Ketosis?

When And How Should You Measure Ketosis?

If you are following a low carbohydrate diet that is based on the ketogenic principles then measuring if you are in ketosis may be an important goal for you. There are times when measuring the specific ketone level may not be required. When is measuring ketosis really needed? My advice to people is if you are following a ketogenic diet for a therapeutic reason (such as epilepsy, cancer, MS, diabetes etc.) then measuring the ketogenic level will be important for you. This is because from the evidence that we have to date, we can see some correlation that in order for the ketogenic diet to be effective, the ketone bodies need to be consistently elevated. If you are someone that is following a ketogenic diet for weight loss, then measuring ketosis through objective ways (I will go over them below), really may not be necessary. There is still this notion that I see online form various Keto Coaches that having a high ketone level in the blood or breath will automatically mean you will lose more weight. I want to say categorically that this is NOT the case. “High blood ketone levels do not automatically mean you will experience a fat loss”. In the next few weeks I will detail in a weekly email exactly why this is the case but for now back to the topic of how to measure ketosis. How to measure ketosis? Subjective Measurements: There are several ways in which you can detect if you are in a ketogenic range. The first way is looking at more subjective measurements. What I mean by this is measurements that focuses more on how you are feeling. In the beginning, you can experience certain symptoms including: nausea, headaches, fatigue, bad breath and weak legs. These symptoms are a sign that your body is now switching from using glucose to using fat for energy. Another subjectiv Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 5 – Ketogenic Diet Blood Tests

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 5 – Ketogenic Diet Blood Tests

My deep ketosis experiment went down in flames this week, but not before I had my blood drawn. I share my ketogenic diet blood tests with you as compared to results from a year ago. So, even though hunger eventually got the best of me, I learned a lot in the process, and hope you did too! Links to my moderate ketosis experiment are provided if you’d like to see what a more successful approach looks like. Note: this post was originally published on Aug 1, 2013. It was edited to streamline content and improve graphics, then re-posted in June 2016, therefore some older comments may pertain to content that was removed during revision. This post is part of a series describing my attempt to follow Dr. Seyfried’s dietary recommendations for cancer. To start at the beginning, please go to the first post: Seyfried’s Ketogenic Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-Start to Ketosis. OH THE HUMANITY… It was the best of times, it was the worst of times… Call me Ishmael… Oh, wait, that last one is completely irrelevant… Before I begin my sorry tale, let me reassure you that I’m feeling much better now. And I have some very interesting lab test results to report. But the previous Thursday was a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. It started off with my posting about my unhappy fourth week on my modified version of Dr. Seyfried’s ketogenic diet. Here’s my data from that Thursday morning: (Food not included because I didn’t keep track.) So off I went to my primary care center, in my fasting state, with my blood sugar at 81 and my ketones at 5.2 (too high to be comfortable), hoping to be back home within an hour or so to eat breakfast and get ready for work. After having my blood drawn, I discovered that my doctor had not been willing to order all of the tests I reque Continue reading >>

Ketosis From Blood Test

Ketosis From Blood Test

I'm glad to see somebody here bought a home blood ketone meter! I used to recommend them here and on other forums, but I stopped because nobody ever listened. My ketone meters are Precision Xtras (I own three). Until recently the Precision Xtra was the only home ketone blood meter on the market. This is the first time I've heard of the Nova Max. Here's an article I wrote last year about the Precision Xtra: You mentioned references; there are plenty in that linked article. Edit: I don't think you need to worry about pathological ketoacidosis. It occurs as a result of disease (e.g. diabetes or alcoholism). I can't find any mention in the literature of it happening to healthy people as a result of diet or fasting, no matter how high their ketone levels climb. If there were any danger of ketoacidosis in healthy people, I would expect to find it mentioned in Epilepsy and The Ketogenic Diet by Strafstrom and Rho. This is the standard medical textbook on keto diets. It has extensive sections on biochemistry and clinical applications. The book doesn't mention ketoacidosis (I searched a PDF version). If there were any risk of ketoacidosis, another place I'd expect to see it mentioned is a terrific review paper on fasting from 1982 called "Fasting: The History, Pathophysiology, and Complications" by Kerndt et al. This paper reviews 175 earlier papers on fasting and tabulates every medical complication that had ever been reported. It doesn't mention even a single instance of pathological ketoacidosis. End of edit Like all home meters, when you use the Precision Xtra to measure glucose, it's not very accurate. But when you use it with ketone strips to measure beta-hydroxybutyrate, it's a whole other story. The Xtra's ketone strips are incredibly accurate. The Xtra's ability to meas Continue reading >>

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

How To Measure Ketones And Optimize Ketogenic Diets

The problem with diets is that we think that one diet should be good for everyone. But research and N=1 experiments show that’s not the case. Learn about measuring ketones and ketosis to understand how your low carb or high fat diet is really affecting you. If there is one area of our bodies that is debated to extremes, with literally hundreds of differing strong opinions on it, it’s nutrition. For many, beliefs about nutrition and diet are tribal. We put ourselves in different camps and we war agains the other camps. Whether it be paleo, low fat, low carb, Atkins, high fat, low protein, vegan, raw vegan and so on. It’s exactly this sort of area where I see data as essential. Without data we have no hope of cutting through the maze of opinions to get to what really works. Part of the problem with nutrition and diets is that we tend to think that one diet should be good for everyone. But increasingly, research and N=1 experiments, are showing that that isn’t the case. And this is exactly why you should pay attention to today’s show. Today, we’re looking at what has relatively recently become the fastest growing nutrition or diet trend. The high fat diet. Also known in different guises as the ketogenic diet, or the low carb diet. And specifically how this can affect our different individual biochemistries, how we can measure “Ketosis” and other biomarkers to understand how our specific biology is reacting to it… and allowing us to troubleshoot and course correct when it isn’t getting the desired results we’re looking for from it. Today’s guest is Jimmy Moore. In 2004, Jimmy, at 32 years, weighed 410 pounds. Since then he has transformed his own biology, shedding all that additional weight with low carb and ketogenic diets. He has also interviewed n Continue reading >>

Ketones: Introduction To Testing Ketones

Ketones: Introduction To Testing Ketones

We’ve all had the question, or been asked the question: how do I know when I’m in ketosis? Should I feel different? Should I have increased mental clarity and focus? While one could give a case-by-case, yes-or-no type response for these questions, the best way is to simply test it out. The problem is that most of us don’t have access to a lab 24/7. Due to this issue, we have three possible ways to test ourselves for ketones from home, namely, urine strips, blood meters, or breath meters. Urine Test Strips There are numerous brands of urine strips to choose from if you decide to go this route and they can be easily obtained at your local drug store or online for a relatively inexpensive price. They can cost anywhere from $9-$20 for about 100 test strips. While this would seem to be the easiest way, it may not be the best way. Urine strips are coated with a chemical that reacts to the presence of acetoacetate (one type of ketone body). However, urine by definition is a waste product. So, while having ketones present in the urine may be a great indication that you are producing them, it could also mean that you are not utilizing them effectively. Also, we tend to see that individuals who have been on the diet for a long period of time and/or individuals that are leaner tend to show lighter or smaller traces of “ketones” on the strips compared to people starting the diet or who are significantly overweight. For this reason, this testing method may be great to let yourself know that you are on the right track with your ketogenic diet but it may not be the best way to know one you are keto-adapted. Blood Meters For a more reliable method of measuring ketones, a blood meter may be the way to go. Diabetics are familiar with the concept, as most glucose meters can also Continue reading >>

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