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Ketosis Appendicitis

Fatty Liver And Its Treatment.

Fatty Liver And Its Treatment.

Fatty liver (steatosis) is pretty much the precondition of fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer.Steatosis and hepatic IR are closely associated but it is still poorly understood whether it is steatosis which causes IR, or vice versa. It is clear however that steatosis and IR usually precede inflammation, fibrosis, and cirrhosis of the liver. Steatosis is produced experimentally in animals by a) toxins and alcohol – in which case the effect will be made worse by high-PUFA diets, reversed by diets providing highly saturated fats, usually beef tallow or coconut oil, and kept stable by moderately saturated fats such as olive oil and lard, b) high-fat diets (high PUFA) with round-the-clock feeding (but not with feeding in a time-restricted window), c) diets deficient in choline, or in the raw materials needed to make choline; methionine, folate and B12 (however, deficiencies of B12 and folate have other serious effects which might mask their importance in this regard), d) diets deficient in antioxidants that prevent lipid peroxidation, usually selenium and tocopherol. Up-regulation of PPAR-alpha is protective against steatohepatitis and inhibits HCV replication. PPARα was also reported to be down-regulated by HCV in the liver of infected patients [88, 89]. Since PPARα blocks the replication and production of infectious viral particles, its downregulation likely confers a replicative advantage to the virus in spite of the resulting metabolic disorders for the host cells [90, 91]. PPAR-alpha is upregulated by intracellular peroxidation of DHA, by carbohydrate restriction, and by fasting, as well as by the flavanone naringenin, an antioxidant found in grapefruit, oranges and tomatoes. From this we might be able to construct a diet that prevents or reverses fatty li Continue reading >>

4 Steps To Heal Diverticulitis Naturally

4 Steps To Heal Diverticulitis Naturally

Is it possible to heal diverticulitis naturally? Let’s say a routine colonoscopy has confirmed that the abdominal complications you have been experiencing is a consequence of diverticulitis. You have been prescribed antibiotics as the recommended conventional treatment for the disease but is this approach in your best interest? Antibiotic treatment has its own risks and can cause pain within the first few days of treatment in which patients are then usually prescribed narcotics. So what should you do? Ignoring signs of the failing health of your digestive tract can lead to worsening symptoms, weakened immunity, and the possibility of interventions like unnecessary surgery in the future. Fortunately, there are natural and inexpensive ways you can treat the infection residing in your digestive tract and prevent flare ups from occurring. In this article, you will discover 4 steps to heal diverticulitis naturally. What Causes Diverticulitis? Small, tubular shaped bulging sacs along the gastrointestinal tract increase in prevalence with age affecting 70% of individuals before they reach 80 years old (13). These pouches are called diverticula and usually concentrate along the colon. Inflammation of one diverticulum or several diverticula can be triggered by a hard mass of feces causing bacteria overgrowth and a resulting infection known as diverticulitis. (1) Various influences contribute to impacted diverticula and infection. One of the greatest factors believed to affect incidence rates is diet. Today our bodies are burdened with managing poor dietary habits in a culture consumed by processed goods, sugar, and trans-fats. Our busy lifestyle has us neglecting the healthy lifestyle choices we should be making. As a consequence we deny ourselves sufficient time to exercise, Continue reading >>

Low Carb Dining At The Emergency Room

Low Carb Dining At The Emergency Room

I’m popping in to relate a little adventure that has a few of those items that go into the bucket list labeled: “prefer not to”. These items were: first time driving myself to the emergency room first time getting a CAT scan first time getting surgery of any kind having an emergency appendectomy This was how *I* spent my weekend. Now, this went about as well as could be expected and is not the point of this post- really. I showed up early before the appendicitis was advanced. That made an already routine surgery even easier. I was completely calm throughout the entire process, with an: ‘oh, well – these things happen’ attitude and an utter lack of drama (which I am sure the hospital staff appreciated). I had laparoscopic – or ‘keyhole’ surgery – and have only 3 tiny holes in my abdomen, took a shower myself the next day and left the next morning. It was so I uneventful that a ‘get well soon’ card would seem out of place. This was less traumatic than most bouts of the flu. What this post is about was maintaining my low carb diet. After 2 weeks I had finally gotten in the groove of low carb and I wasn’t about to let a potentially life- threatening condition spoil my diet. Appendicitis has the benefit for dieters of killing appetite – before it kills you, of course, so eating wasn’t on my mind prior to surgery – getting that damn appendix out of me was my primary focus as I felt like hell. Later, now appendix-free and out of recovery and into my room, I was brought a meal of ‘clear liquids’. What garlic is to a vampire and Kryptonite to Superman, this ‘meal’ was to a guy who just got into ketosis that day: iced tea with high fructose corn syrup raspberry ices with corn syrup jello with high fructose corn syrup (noted on the printout Continue reading >>

Blood And Protein In Urine Appendicitis

Blood And Protein In Urine Appendicitis

Blood And Protein In Urine Appendicitis - Protein supplements affect liver blood tests, Protein is an essential nutrient needed to build muscle, repair and maintain connective tissue, and synthesize enzymes. most americans are not protein. Causes diagnosis hematuria (blood urine), Blood in the urine (referred to as hematuria) can have many causes ranging from simple to serious which your doctor can pinpoint with certain tests.. Know kidney numbers: simple tests - national, Did you know one in three american adults is at risk for kidney disease? anyone can get kidney disease at any time. if kidney disease is found and treated early, you. Alt | canine liver disease foundation, A thorough approach is needed for a correct diagnosis of any liver problem. an organ like the liver that is so intimately involved with other important organs will. Liver disease symptoms - symptoms liver problems, Liver disease symptoms. often people feel that they might be suffering from some kind of liver disease but it can be a hideous act for anybody to identify. Liver function tests & blood tests - university north, Written by jens joergen jaeger and hanne hedegaard, denmark. about blood tests . what does it mean - and what is normal in blood tests ? the names may be different in. How kidneys work - national kidney foundation, Removing waste from the body is only one of the main functions of your kidneys. take a look at the things kidneys do that makes them so important.. Liver panel - lab tests online, A blood sample drawn from a vein in your arm; for infants, blood may be drawn by puncturing the heel with a lancet.. Natural home remedies kidney stones pain: treatment, Kidney stones are hard masses in the kidneys and bladder and are made up of tiny minerals that crystallize in the kidneys. re Continue reading >>

13 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

13 Foods To Eat On A Ketogenic Diet

A ketogenic diet, or simply keto diet, involves eating foods low in carbohydrates, but high in fat. This combination causes your body to produce a ketone known as beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Ketones can be an alternative metabolic fuel, but if your body does not have enough glucose to use it, your body will tap into fat stores for energy in a process called ketosis. Many celebrities live on a ketogenic diet because it can assist with weight loss, control blood sugar, and even help ward off diseases such as Alzheimer’s. Unlike other diets, you can consume a variety of healthy foods that are also nutritious. Check out these foods you can eat on a ketogenic diet. 1. Seafood Salmon has also been a healthy food for your brain because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Sardines and mackerel have a high amount of the fats, too, which can help lower insulin levels. Salmon is also packed with potassium, selenium, B vitamins, and zero carbohydrates. While shrimp and some forms of crab have no carbohydrates either, shell shellfish do. However, you can still eat clams, oysters, squid, and other seafood on the ketogenic diet; you just have to account for a few carbohydrates. Eat at least two servings of seafood a week is a healthy consumption of vitamins, minerals, and omega-3s. 2. Low-Carb Vegetables Chances are good you can stand to eat a couple more servings of vegetables every day. Although they are healthy for you, in general, there are a couple of vegetables you can add to your ketogenic diet. For example, one cup of raw spinach has less than one gram of carbohydrates. Cooked Brussels sprouts have nearly eight grams of carbs. Both are healthy and contain antioxidants that protect you from free radicals, which cause cellular damage. However, make sure you steer clear of star Continue reading >>

What’s A Ketogenic Diet?

What’s A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is It? “Ketogenic” is a term for a low-carb diet (like the Atkins diet). The idea is for you to get more calories from protein and fat and less from carbohydrates. You cut back most on the carbs that are easy to digest, like sugar, soda, pastries, and white bread. When you eat less than 50 grams of carbs a day, your body eventually runs out of fuel (blood sugar) it can use quickly. This typically takes 3 to 4 days. Then you’ll start to break down protein and fat for energy, which can make you lose weight. This is called ketosis. Who Uses It? People use a ketogenic diet most often to lose weight, but it can help manage certain medical conditions, like epilepsy, too. It also may help people with heart disease, certain brain diseases, and even acne, but there needs to be more research in those areas. Talk with your doctor first to find out if it’s safe for you to try a ketogenic diet, especially if you have type 1 diabetes. Weight Loss A ketogenic diet may help you lose more weight in the first 3 to 6 months than some other diets. This may be because it takes more calories to change fat into energy than it does to change carbs into energy. It’s also possible that a high-fat, high-protein diet satisfies you more, so you eat less, but that hasn’t been proved yet. Insulin is a hormone that lets your body use or store sugar as fuel. Ketogenic diets make you burn through this fuel quickly, so you don’t need to store it. This means your body needs -- and makes -- less insulin. Those lower levels may help protect you against some kinds of cancer or even slow the growth of cancer cells. More research is needed on this, though. It seems strange that a diet that calls for more fat can raise “good” cholesterol and lower “bad” cholesterol, but ketogenic diet Continue reading >>

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Practice Essentials Hyperemesis gravidarum is the most severe form of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy, characterized by persistent nausea and vomiting associated with ketosis and weight loss (>5% of prepregnancy weight). This condition may cause volume depletion, electrolytes and acid-base imbalances, nutritional deficiencies, and even death. Severe hyperemesis requiring hospital admission occurs in 0.3-2% of pregnancies. [1] Signs and symptoms The defining symptoms of hyperemesis gravidarum are gastrointestinal in nature and include nausea and vomiting. Other common symptoms include ptyalism (excessive salivation), fatigue, weakness, and dizziness. Patients may also experience the following: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis Physical examination in women with suspected hyperemesis gravidarum is usually unremarkable. Findings may be more helpful if the patient has unusual complaints suggestive of other disorders (eg, bleeding, abdominal pain). Examination includes the following: Vital signs, including standing and lying blood pressure and pulse Volume status (eg, mucous membrane condition, skin turgor, neck veins, mental status) General appearance (eg, nutrition, weight) Laboratory tests Initial laboratory studies used in the evaluation of women with hyperemesis gravidarum should include the following: Imaging studies The following imaging studies may be used to assess women with hyperemesis gravidarum: Obstetric ultrasonography: Usually warranted to evaluate for multiple gestations or trophoblastic disease Upper abdominal ultrasonography: If clinically indicated, to evaluate the pancreas and/or biliary tree Abdominal computed tomography scanning or magnetic resonance imaging: If appendicitis is suspected as a cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnanc Continue reading >>

Strange And Schafermeyer's Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 4e >

Strange And Schafermeyer's Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 4e >

Abdominal pain accounts for approximately 10% visits and elicits a broad differential, with more serious etiologies often presenting similar to processes that are benign and self-limited.1 The most frequently encountered surgical and medical causes of abdominal pain are addressed herein, including causes of abdominal pain that are unique to the female and male reproductive tracts. Abdominal pain can be visceral or somatic. Visceral pain is poorly localized and difficult to describe, even in older children; somatic pain is intense and readily localized. Referred pain syndromes manifested as abdominal pain may be characteristic of a variety of clinical problems. An effective relationship with the caregiver and careful observation can provide abundant information about a child's diagnosis. With older patients, the presence of a caregiver may hinder communication, particularly when needing an accurate sexual history. Overall, formulate questions appropriate for the child's level of development, regardless of the patient's age. Use open-ended inquiries over “yes or no” questions. Create a preliminary differential diagnosis, including abdominal conditions, systemic illnesses, and referred pain syndromes. Afferent nerves from distant organs can share central pathways that allow pain from one organ to be interpreted as if the stimulus is affecting another organ. A classic example is a right lower-lobe pneumonia that refers pain to the abdomen mimicking appendicitis. Conversely, some conditions that are intra-abdominal in origin may produce pain syndromes that are manifested in other locations; for example, shoulder pain due to hepatic irritation (right), or splenic rupture (left), and groin pain from renal stones. Table 69-1 lists extra-abdominal and systemic conditions tha Continue reading >>

‘strange Pain’ In Side Related To Low-carb?

‘strange Pain’ In Side Related To Low-carb?

A reader e-mailed me yesterday about something that reminded me of something my wife Christine has been going through this year. You might remember me talking about Christine having a mysterious pain in her side that was causing her a lot of pain and test after test after test kept coming back negative. Finally, she saw a surgeon about it last month and he determined it was her gall bladder. It was removed a few weeks ago and Christine is now feeling a million times better. So when I read about this very active 26-year-old, 115-pound woman having “a strange pain appear on my lower right abdominal side,” I immediately perked up. However, unlike Christine who is NOT livin’ la vida low-carb, this woman has been on a low-carb diet for health reasons since April 2006 and was seeing fantastic improvements in her health and skin. But then that “strange pain” hit her with a nearly constant feeling that felt like she was “stabbed inside, swollen, crampy.” It has come and gone several times, but has gotten progressively worse and worse with no signs of improvement. She has gotten tested with x-rays, an ultrasound of various regions of her abdomen, blood tests and everything has come back normal. In fact, since she started livin’ la vida low-carb, her lipid profile has been excellent and she has not had any problems with indigestion or acid reflux. One area of her health that has change is her period cycle which she said has been “messed up” since all of this started. “I bleed between periods for a day or two, and also the first period after I began with my low-carb diet was missing (or was at least very delayed),” she wrote. There are a lot of things this could be and I wrote back to her stating I am by no means an expert on these kinds of conditions, espe Continue reading >>

What Does Ketosis Mean?

What Does Ketosis Mean?

Ketosis does not mean that you are losing weight. It really just means that your liver is turning a lot of protein and other noncarbohydrates to sugar. Today, many people on the Internet are urging people to eat a ketogenic diet: a diet that is so high in fat and so low in carbohydrates that it causes people to go into a state of ketosis. Ketosis means that “ketone bodies,” which are the chemical byproducts of an alternative method of burning fat, build up in the bloodstream. Ketogenic diets are often described as “Paleo” because many laymen imagine that human beings must have eaten ketogenic diets during the Paleolithic era (early stone age). Yet there is no reason to believe that stone age people ate a ketogenic diet. Most people in the stone age would have eaten the starchy plant material, especially roots and tubers, that they could safely and easily obtain from their environment. As a result, stone age people would have gotten more than enough carbohydrate to keep them from going into ketosis. In fact, when anthropologists look at the skeletal remains of stone age people, they find starch grains embedded in the tartar on their teeth. Even the Inuit’s (Eskimos’) traditional winter diet, which consisted entirely of fatty meats and fish, did not produce ketosis. Studies done in the early 20th century found that the Inuit did not get ketosis unless they were fasting. The Inuit were eating raw meat that was either freshly killed or frozen immediately after being killed. Unlike the meat you would buy at a supermarket, this fresh or rapidly frozen meat still contained a starch called glycogen. The Inuit also used a method of meat preservation that converted some protein to sugar. As a result, the Inuit’s traditional diet contained a surprisingly large amount Continue reading >>

Appendicitis Diet: Can Foods Lead To This Disorder?

Appendicitis Diet: Can Foods Lead To This Disorder?

Since appendicitis occurs in a part of the digestive system, it’s not unusual for people to blame their diet for this ailment Although many doctors tell their patients that they can eat “anything,” remember that there are certain foods that you should limit or avoid during the first month after having an appendectomy When it comes to this condition, one question that most people would usually ask is "What foods can actually cause appendicitis?" Since this disorder occurs in a part of the digestive system, it's not unusual for people to blame their diet for this ailment. But while it's true that what you consume has a direct impact on your digestive (and overall) health, it does not necessarily mean that the foods you eat can actually cause this disorder. Spicy Foods and Plant Seeds Are Often (Wrongly) Blamed for Appendicitis People who love spicy foods often feel disheartened when they're told that these can cause appendicitis. But the truth is that eating spicy foods cannot cause appendicitis and will not make it burst. While it's possible for a piece of spicy food to cause a blockage in the appendix, it is not the spiciness of the food that can lead to this condition. However, consuming spicy foods like hot peppers, chili and salsa can affect your digestion, cause discomfort and mimic the early signs of appendicitis. It can lead to indigestion, which causes severe pain in the area between the breastbone and bellybutton (the area of the body where appendicitis first manifests), as well as nausea. Sometimes, the pain is so severe that it's often mistaken for appendicitis or a burst appendix — even though it's not.1 Fruit and plant seeds and other residuals are also sometimes blamed for appendicitis, and for this reason, people become hesitant to consume them. Ex Continue reading >>

Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

Signs & Symptoms The hallmark of cyclic vomiting syndrome is recurrent episodes of severe nausea and vomiting. In children, these episodes usually last for several hours to a few days. In adults, episodes tend to occur less frequently, but usually last longer for 8 days. These recurrent, characteristic episodes are extremely similar within each individual, often beginning at the same time of day, with the same severity, duration and associated symptoms, as in previous episodes. Episodes often occur in the early morning hours or upon awakening in the morning. Affected individuals may only experience episodes several times a year or as frequently as several times a month. On occasion after years of cycling, episodes can “coalesce” together with daily nausea and mild vomiting between severe attacks such that there is no symptom-free period. The nausea and vomiting that characterize these episodes are often quite severe. Nausea can be persistent and intense. Unlike most other gastrointestinal disorders, the vomiting in CVS does not typically relieve the nausea. Affected children may experience bouts of rapid-fire, projectile vomiting as frequently as four or more times per hour with a peak pace of every 5-15 minutes. After the contents of the stomach are emptied, individuals may continue to dry heave. Symptoms can be so severe that affected individuals are unable to walk or talk and in some cases may appear unconscious or comatose. Episodes may cause affected individuals to withdraw from social interaction. The behavior of drinking water to dilute the bile and induce vomiting and hence reduce nausea is common, and should not be confused with a psychogenic cause. More commonly described in adults but also occurring in children, many take continuous prolonged hot shower o Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Disease And The Standard American Diet – My Personal Account

Gallbladder Disease And The Standard American Diet – My Personal Account

Do you suffer from gallbladder pain or gallstones? Many doctors suggest eating a so-called “low-fat” diet, taking drugs, and if trouble persists, having the gallbladder removed (cholecystectomy). The biggest problem with this advise is that doctors will tell patients that something is actually wrong with the organ itself – that it’s malfunctioning, and needs to be removed. That’s only part of the story. Most of the time, they completely fail to mention the cause of gallbladder disease in the first place. Patients are told the terrible news – that gallstones usually cannot be avoided. The other organ doctors are fond of harvesting, which we are told we can do without, is the appendix. Again, no one mentions to patients why their appendix is failing. Although you might be told that for some unknown reason, the appendix becomes clogged with toxins over time – and there is nothing you can do about it. But actually, this is not the case. The purpose of the gallbladder and appendix Like the appendix, which has finally been acknowledged recently by modern medicine to actually “having a function” in supporting the endocrine and immune systems, the gallbladder has long been thought to be an organ we can live without. The appendix is actually critical in the storage of beneficial bacteria which support digestion and immune system health. If you’ve had your appendix removed, you will need to eat fermented and cultured foods regularly to maintain this proper balance of good flora to support every aspect of your health. Research shows that removal of this important organ can actually lead to health issues including diarrhea from constant bile dripping into the small intestine which can lead to colon and bowel cancer. Losing an organ like the gallbladder causes th Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Appendicitis And What Really Causes It?????

Appendicitis And What Really Causes It?????

OK, so my wife is literally going under the knife in about 45 minutes from the time I'm writing this. She will have her apppendix (sp?) removed. It should be pretty standard with not much to worry about. But it got me thinking, what REALLY causes this appendicitis and the need for removal? We have been grain free for over 2 years now. Once a month sushi (rice). Local food, pastured this and that meats, wild caught, fermenting veggies, good fats, no legumes, butter (some hard cheese 1x per week), 2x CF weekly, etc, etc... (seriously, we're the top 5%ers). Starting my research, but thanks for the insight. LOL, by the time I get my hands around this, her appendix will be removed. :) Craig Continue reading >>

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