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Ketosis And Pregnancy Test

Could Medications Interfere With Test Results?

Could Medications Interfere With Test Results?

Fertility drugs or other medications that contain HCG might interfere with home pregnancy test results. However, most medications, including antibiotics and birth control pills, don't affect the accuracy of home pregnancy tests. Could a positive result be wrong? Although rare, it's possible to get a positive result from a home pregnancy test when you're not actually pregnant. This is known as a false-positive. A false-positive might happen if you had a pregnancy loss soon after the fertilized egg attached to your uterine lining (biochemical pregnancy) or you take a pregnancy test too soon after taking a fertility drug that contains HCG. An ectopic pregnancy, menopause or problems with your ovaries also might contribute to misleading test results. Could a negative result be wrong? It's possible to get a negative result from a home pregnancy test when you're actually pregnant. This is known as a false-negative — and it's much more likely to occur than is a false-positive. You might get a false-negative if you: Take the test too early. The earlier after a missed period that you take a home pregnancy test, the harder it is for the test to detect HCG. For the most accurate results, take the test one week after a missed period — when the level of HCG in your urine is most likely to be detectable. If you can't wait that long, ask your health care provider for a blood test. Check test results too soon. Be sure to give the test time to work. Consider setting a timer according to the package instructions. Use diluted urine. For the most accurate results, take the test first thing in the morning — when your urine is the most concentrated. What happens next? Based on your test results, consider taking the following steps: Your home pregnancy test is positive, or you've taken Continue reading >>

5 Things That Can Cause A False-positive Pregnancy Test

5 Things That Can Cause A False-positive Pregnancy Test

When Whitney Way Thore—the star of TLC's reality show My Big Fat Fabulous Life—took three pregnancy tests and each one was positive, she was pretty confident she was pregnant. She even took a urine test at the doctor's office, and it came back positive, too. It was amazing news for Thore, especially because she suffers from polycystic ovary syndrome. PCOS is a female endocrine disorder that is caused by a hormonal imbalance and is marked by small cysts on the ovaries. The disorder affects the body's ability to ovulate normally, causing really irregular periods and making PCOS one of the most common causes of infertility. Knowing this made Thore's pregnancy news even more exciting. She'd previously worried about her chances of getting pregnant. Her elation, however, faded when she visited the doctor for an ultrasound. In last week's episode, Thore is shown having that ultrasound. The doctor can't find any signs of a pregnancy, and she's told she had a false-positive pregnancy test. "A part of me felt relieved, but to my surprise, the biggest part of me felt disappointed," Thore wrote on her TLC blog after the episode aired. And she took to Facebook to share that rewatching the episode—which was filmed in August—was difficult, too. "This is as hard to watch as it was to go through, but I'm thankful for your support," she wrote. A false-positive pregnancy test can be devastating—especially for women who have difficulty conceiving or who are actively trying to get pregnant. Thankfully, false positives are rare, though they can happen for a handful of reasons. It's unclear what exactly led to Thore's false positive, but here we dive into the most common causes. In order to understand how a false-positive pregnancy test can happen, it's important to first know how a Continue reading >>

Is Keto Dangerous While Pregnant, Breastfeeding, Or For Children?

Is Keto Dangerous While Pregnant, Breastfeeding, Or For Children?

A question I’ve come across seemingly increasingly in the past few months, is a variation of, is it safe for kids to eat keto, including women during pregnancy and breastfeeding? This is where a simple disambiguation between a well and poorly formulated diet should end the discussion but let’s dig a little bit deeper into the concerns themselves, studies on children, the validity thereof, what a good diet is and context. One of the applications of a well formulated ketogenic diet has been in treatment of PCOS with much success, though more research is needed. You can search for yourself to find more info on this and the specifics with lots of other blogs and anecdotes covering it out there, but between weight loss and improved hormone regulation from better food choices it’s a way to manage symptoms and issues associated with the disorder. Many women who see improvements have noted they end up with a surprise pregnancy after starting low carb. Though usually planned or at least semi-planned, you can find near endless anecdotes of despite several years of trying, a sudden ketobaby happened after a few weeks or months of low carb. Just search through //www.reddit.com/r/xxketo and /r/ketobabies for personal accounts thereof. If you’ve done prior research into keto, you should already know that improvements in endocrine function are one of the benefits with plenty of evidence to support it. So if you’ve found yourself with a surprise baby thanks to keto the next question is, can you, should you, or is it dangerous to continue while pregnant? Ketosis and Pregnancy: Thanks to Japan and low carb as a treatment for diabetes we do have some research done regarding the application of a low carb diet in pregnant mothers on ketone levels and their role. Aside from this, c Continue reading >>

Will Keto//os Cause A

Will Keto//os Cause A "false Positive" On A Drug Test?

There are no scientific studies investigating this possibility. Thus, there is currently no objective evidence to suggest that being in ketosis, whether via the ketogenic diet nor exogenous ketone supplements, could cause a “false positive” on a drug test. This question has been posed often on online forums by users consuming a ketogenic diet concerned by such a possibility. Collectively, the responses to these questions include anecdotal reports of users who were in ketosis when drug tested and experience no such problem. Thus, it does not appear to be a matter of concern. Continue reading >>

Blog: What Causes A False Negative Pregnancy Test

Blog: What Causes A False Negative Pregnancy Test

always assumed that home pregnancy tests were idiot-proof. If you see a plus sign, you're pregnant. If you see a minus sign, you aren't. I know that these tests are usually accurate, but the possibility that I am experiencing a false negative test result is keeping me up at night! A false negative pregnancy test result can happen for many reasons. If you pee on the stick too early in your cycle, the test can show up as negative when in fact a little bun is already cookin' in your oven. Also, when you test after drinking a lot of liquids the result can be compromised. That's why it is best to test first thing in the morning. In my case, my cycles are just nutty. I envy women who have regular cycles of 28 to 30 days. Recently I've gone nearly six weeks without getting my period. I'm not sure when I ovulated so when I take a home pregnancy test, the timing is pretty much a guess. That's why I don't trust that minus sign that I stared at for what seemed like hours. While it is possible that the test was telling me the truth, I truly want to believe that I'm pregnant...ergo my tender emotional state and sleepless nights. Even when you don't have the possibility of a false negative pregnancy test result, the process of trying to conceive is fraught with high and low emotions. I pity the server who waited on me this morning at the diner; I think I cried for at least half of the meal. I'm sure women everywhere can relate to the desire to conceive and the heartache that comes along with finding out that it didn't happen this month. I'm still not sure what the outcome will be for me this time. Either way, I hope there's a plus sign in my near future! Have you ever experienced a false negative result? If so, when did you find out you really were expecting? Tell us below in the com Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Toxaemia And

Pregnancy Toxaemia And

Contents Industry Background Management Nutrition Animal Health Breeding Fibre Production Fibre Marketing Meat Production and Marketing Pasture and Weed Control Economic Analysis Tanning Skins ketosis in goats The diseases pregnancy toxaemia and ketosis can cause severe problems in goats. While the diseases are clinically different and occur during different stages of pregnancy and lactation, the basis of the disorder is essentially the same: a decrease in blood sugar levels and an increase in ketones. In ruminants, glucose is synthesised mainly from propionic acid (a volatile fatty acid produced in the rumen) and from amino acids. The amount of glucose that is absorbed directly depends on how much dietary carbohydrate escapes rumen fermentation and is digested in the small intestine. This form of glucose uptake varies with different feeds as well as their treatment. Ruminants can use products from rumen fermentation, such as volatile fatty acids, for most of their energy requirements. However, the nervous system, kidneys, mammary gland and foetus have a direct requirement for glucose. During periods of peak glucose requirement (late pregnancy and early lactation) problems may arise due to a glucose deficiency. The incidence of pregnancy toxaemia and ketosis varies with the two main types of goats. In dairy goats with a genetic potential for high milk production, ketosis may be a potential problem; in non-milch goats (Angora, Cashmere and meat) pregnancy toxaemia is more common. PREGNANCY TOXAEMIA Main causes The most important cause of pregnancy toxaemia is a decline in the plane of nutrition during the last six to eight weeks of pregnancy. This places the pregnant female in a difficult situation because the developing foetus imposes an unremitting drain on available m Continue reading >>

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet During Pregnancy On Embryonic Growth In The Mouse

Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet During Pregnancy On Embryonic Growth In The Mouse

Go to: The increasing use of the ketogenic diet (KD), particularly by women of child-bearing age, raises a question about its suitability during gestation. To date, no studies have thoroughly investigated the direct implications of a gestational ketogenic diet on embryonic development. To fill this knowledge gap we imaged CD-1 mouse embryos whose mothers were fed either a Standard Diet (SD) or a KD 30 days prior to, as well as during gestation. Images were collected at embryonic days (E) 13.5 using Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) and at E17.5 using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). An anatomical comparison of the SD and KD embryos revealed that at E13.5 the average KD embryo was volumetrically larger, possessed a relatively larger heart but smaller brain, and had a smaller pharynx, cervical spinal cord, hypothalamus, midbrain, and pons, compared with the average SD embryo. At E17.5 the KD embryo was found to be volumetrically smaller with a relatively smaller heart and thymus, but with enlarged cervical spine, thalamus, midbrain and pons. A ketogenic diet during gestation results in alterations in embryonic organ growth. Such alterations may be associated with organ dysfunction and potentially behavioral changes in postnatal life. Keywords: Ketogenic diet, Low-carbohydrate diet, Embryonic development, CD-1 mouse, Mouse imaging, Optical projection tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging An illustration of the animal-to-animal variation within the SD group at E13.5. The coloured traces are outlines of all linearly-aligned individual SD images, and the white region is a mask of the final average image. Click on the image to see a larger version. Embryonic size difference at E17.5. (A) A consensus average of all E17.5 embryos constructed using the SD and KD MRI embryo im Continue reading >>

Testing For Ketones

Testing For Ketones

Copyright © 1998 [email protected] All rights reserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is not intended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consult your health provider. This particular web section is designed to present more than one view of a controversial subject, pro and con. It should be re-emphasized that nothing herein should be considered medical advice. Contents What are Ketones? What Causes Ketones? The Ketone Controversy Ketone Tests vs. Other Urine Tests Testing and Managing Ketones Kmom's Ketone Story Ketone References What are Ketones? Ketones are formed when your body's fat stores have to be accessed for energy. Normally, you eat food and then the body converts it to glucose/blood sugar for use as energy by your cells. Your insulin is then like a key, unlocking the door to the cell so it can access this blood sugar. In pregnancy, placental hormones make you more resistant to your own insulin (in essence 'warping' the key to the door) and make it harder to get that glucose from your blood into your cells. So while your blood remains high in blood sugar, your cells can be starving. The fetus absolutely must have energy, so if your pancreas cannot make enough insulin to overcome the hormone-caused resistance, the cells start accessing other sources of energy, like fat stores. The by-product of this is ketones. Ketones may be dangerous when pregnant, although this is controversial and still being studied and disputed. There were several studies that showed that babies exposed to a lot of ketones had learning problems and reduced IQ later in life. These have since been disputed by other studies, but just in case, everyone plays it safe during pregnancy, which is very prudent. What Causes Ketones? Ketones usually occur because you are ei Continue reading >>

Video: What You Need To Know About Keto And Pregnancy

Video: What You Need To Know About Keto And Pregnancy

Is eating ketogenic safe for a pregnant woman? Whether I would continue to eat high-fat, low-carb, ketogenic if I got pregnant tomorrow. There’s a lot of misinformation on the interwebs about whether a high-fat eating style is safe for pregnancy. Today, I’m sharing whether I would continue to eat high-fat, low-carb, ketogenic if I got pregnant tomorrow. I bust through some keto pregnancy myths, breakdown the ketogenic eating style that may respond best for pregnant ladies and share how to reduce water retention and all around puffiness throughout your pregnancy. A must-watch if you’re eating high-fat, or interested in eating high-fat, and plan to be pregnant at some point in your life. For video transcription, scroll down. Highlights… Why it’s widely accepted that ketosis is dangerous for pregnant women How many ketones a fetus needs to flourish 5 ways to slightly adjust a ketogenic eating style to work for your pregnancy Resources… Are you pregnant or planning to be? How will you approach your eating style while pregnant? Let’s chat about it in the comments… Hey, ladies. I’m assuming that the individuals watching this show today are going to be primarily women because today we’re talking about pregnancy and whether or not eating high fat is okay when you’re pregnant or eating more ketogenic. Congratulations if you are trying to get pregnant or you’re already pregnant. That is awesome. I am super happy for you. Maybe you are eating ketogenic or more fat fueled like what I outlined in my program or you’re eating more high fat and you’re wondering like, “Is this safe for the growing baby inside me?” First off, I can’t tell you what to do specifically but what I can do is share what I would do if I were in your position. Preparing for this Continue reading >>

Ketosis During Pregnancy

Ketosis During Pregnancy

So I did a urine dip stick test and my ketones were really high (the second highest) and I also had elevated protein and bilirubin. I'm only 7 weeks pregnant and I've been very nauseous but no vomiting. I really can't stomach eating very much at all and I've lost 10 lbs in the last 3 weeks! With my daughter, I also had morning sickness but lost about 12 lbs over 3 months. The only difference between this pregnancy and the last is that I'm paleo now, and I wasn't with my daughter. I'm wondering if anyone else has had this? Should I be eating the most sugary foods I can manage? I'm not sure what to do. I haven't gone to the doctor about it yet, but I'm planning on making an appointment if things don't get better in a couple of days. Continue reading >>

Is Low Carb And Keto Safe During Pregnancy?

Is Low Carb And Keto Safe During Pregnancy?

When Carolina Cartier discovered she was pregnant with twins this past March, she never questioned whether she would continue eating a ketogenic diet. The 31-year-old Seattle area woman had been plagued by metabolic issues literally all her life: precocious puberty at age 3; polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) by age 14; weight gain of 320 lbs (145 kg) on her 6 foot (183 cm) frame and pre-diabetes by her 20s. Her PCOS caused her ovaries to be enlarged and covered in cysts. She was told she was infertile and likely never able to have children. In August 2014, aged 28, her health was so poor that she went on medical disability from her job as a financial analyst. That first month off, however, she discovered and adopted the ketogenic diet. Between summer 2014 and February 2017, she lost 120 lbs (54 kg), experienced her first ever natural menstrual period that gradually established into a regular 28-day cycle; her blood sugar normalized and her ovaries reduced to 3.5 cm (< 1.5 inches) size. Her long-standing depression lifted. While she lost two early pregnancies at the start of 2016, likely because of poor egg quality, she knew she was getting healthier every day. Her positive pregnancy test in March 2017 was a happy surprise, as was the news soon after that she was carrying healthy twins. Except for a bout of extreme nausea and sea sickness for a week on a low-carb cruise early in this pregnancy, she has adhered to the ketogenic diet now through to 20 weeks of pregnancy and counting. She plans to continue this way of eating for the rest of her life. She feels great and looks wonderful; the twins in utero are thriving. “My life is transformed. Why would I even consider abandoning this way of eating when all of my positive health changes, and my pregnancy, I owe to this d Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

These 4 Factors Could All Cause A Pregnancy Test To Be Wrong

These 4 Factors Could All Cause A Pregnancy Test To Be Wrong

The results of a pregnancy test can be life-changing, but they can also (sometimes) be wrong. At the core, home tests are designed to pick up traces of human chorionic gonadotropin, or HCG a hormone that is produced during pregnancy. HCG is made by cells formed in the placenta, in order to help grow the fertilized egg after it has attached to the uterine wall, according to The American Pregnancy Association. "Like all hormones, HCG has several functions in the body," says Heather Bartos, M.D., ob-gyn. "The hormone is produced by placental cells and promotes the corpus luteum, a normal ovarian cyst in pregnancy, which secrets progesterone. Progesterone is necessary for a healthy pregnancy. HCG may also have an effect of helping prevent immune reactions toward a developing fetus." Pregnancy tests are advertised as 99 percent accurate, if done correctly. In short: a woman pees on the end of a dipstick and her urine comes into contact with a specially treated strip made to detect if HCG is present. In minutes, results are available via positive/negative symbols or pregnant/not pregnant text. But, sometimes other factors affect the results of even the most reliable kits. (Hit the reset button—and burn fat like crazy with The Body Clock Diet!) During pregnancy, HCG levels increase daily. If a woman thinks she's getting a false positive result, an immediate visit to the doctor is imperative. Blood tests should be taken, and administered again 48 hours later. Ultimately, the origin of elevated HCG in the blood needs to be determined. If it's due to pregnancy, these specific hormone levels will double within two days time, says Bartos. Blood tests can detect pregnancy sooner, and more accurately, than at-home tests. Here are four reasons why the stick you’ve peed on may be m Continue reading >>

How To Get Amazing Results From A Bleach Pregnancy Test?

How To Get Amazing Results From A Bleach Pregnancy Test?

So, your honeymoon happened a month ago, and now your menstrual period is delayed. In contrast, you had been trying to get pregnant for the longest time, and you feel you might be pregnant now. What will be your next step to confirm if you are indeed pregnant? Have you ever heard of the bleach pregnancy test? Most women who suspect they are pregnant will automatically grab an over-the-counter (OTC) early pregnancy test. Then, wait for the double line results in a pregnancy strip. Why not use a common household item that is used to fight against germs and makes clothes whiter, such as bleach? This article discusses this do-it-yourself (DIY) pregnancy test including its advantages, limitations, and the materials needed to conduct the test. How to Get Amazing Results From a Bleach Pregnancy Test? DIY Pregnancy Tests The sense of urgency to determine early pregnancy gave rise to alternative and DIY pregnancy tests. Aside from bleach, the other household items used to establish early pregnancy are sugar, vinegar, baking soda, and toothpaste. The focus of this article is on bleach because of its advantages and the testimonials mentioned in forums such as BabyCenter. Advantages of the Bleach Pregnancy Test There are four main pros of the bleach test. First, bleach is a cheap alternative to early pregnancy test kits. You do not have to rush to the drug store to buy a test kit. Second, bleach is a household item that is readily available. You can use any brand, whether liquid or powder form. Third, the test can be performed very discretely, allowing you to conceal your condition. No medical instruments are needed. Lastly, you will know the results in just a few minutes. You can jump for joy immediately if the result is positive. For a woman who is always busy and has no time to Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

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