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Ketosis And Ketoacidosis

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What’s The Difference Between Ketosis And Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Ketosis and ketoacidosis sound similar and are sometimes confused, but don’t mistake these conditions for one another. These involve two different sets of circumstances with considerably different outlooks. Both are triggered by an increase of ketones in the body, which are acids released into the bloodstream when the body burns fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. But it’s how the body responds to this increase that sets ketosis and ketoacidosis apart from each other. RELATED: How to Tell the Difference Between Good and Bad Carbs What Is Ketosis and How Does the Process Work? “Ketosis is a natural state that occurs when you start to metabolize fat instead of sugar,” says Michael Greenfield, MD, endocrinologist and chief medical officer at El Camino Hospital in Palo Alto, California. “It occurs often when people fast and use up the stores of sugar in their body." To understand ketosis, it helps to understand how the body burns energy. Carbohydrates and fat are both energy sources, and the body typically burns carbs (sugar or glucose) first, and then fat. If there aren’t enough carbohydrates in your system, it begins to break down fat for energy, which puts your body Continue reading >>

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  1. Carolyn B

    High fasting blood sugar on keto

    Hi. I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in November 2016. My brother has Type 2 so I knew I had to do something to stop my pre-diabetes from progressing I started to eat low carb and saw a slow reduction in my BS numbers. Then a month or so ago I started adding fat to my diet and am now eating keto. I am in low ketosis (urine test). My daily carb intake is approximately 40-60 grams.
    The results have been nothing short of miraculous! I've lost 17 pounds, my triglycerides have plummeted from 240 to 60, BP is way down, cholesterol dropped. All of my numbers look better than they have my entire adult life. My body seems to love this way of eating. It's been amazing and not difficult at all!
    My A1C went from 5.9 to 5.4. I am guessing it's around 5.2 now but I haven't tested since I went full keto. My only problem is that my morning fasting number has inched up. It was 95-99 when I was diagnosed. Then when I started to change my diet it dropped to the 88-95 range. After I started keto it's moved up to the 100-105 range. I'd like to work on getting this number down. My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number?
    Thanks so much.

  2. jdm1217

    Originally Posted by Carolyn B
    Hi. I was diagnosed with pre-diabetes in November 2016. My brother has Type 2 so I knew I had to do something to stop my pre-diabetes from progressing I started to eat low carb and saw a slow reduction in my BS numbers. Then a month or so ago I started adding fat to my diet and am now eating keto. I am in low ketosis (urine test). My daily carb intake is approximately 40-60 grams.
    The results have been nothing short of miraculous! I've lost 17 pounds, my triglycerides have plummeted from 240 to 60, BP is way down, cholesterol dropped. All of my numbers look better than they have my entire adult life. My body seems to love this way of eating. It's been amazing and not difficult at all!
    My A1C went from 5.9 to 5.4. I am guessing it's around 5.2 now but I haven't tested since I went full keto. My only problem is that my morning fasting number has inched up. It was 95-99 when I was diagnosed. Then when I started to change my diet it dropped to the 88-95 range. After I started keto it's moved up to the 100-105 range. I'd like to work on getting this number down. My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number?
    Thanks so much. I've been there at times and I don't even worry about it, especially if your A1C is still good.

  3. Nicoletti

    Originally Posted by Carolyn B
    My one and two hour post meal numbers are good, usually in the 100-120 range. Any suggestions on how I can lower the fasting number? Give it more time. Fasting numbers are usually the last to come down. It took me about a year of low-carb eating to get fastings in the 80s, and that's common for others here, too; it takes time.

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Which is the best weight loss diet? Ketogenic diet vs low carb diet vs atkins vs paleo? Which one of these meal plans is best to burn fat? FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d... Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O70G4m Isn't the ketogenic diet and low carb diet essentially the same thing? How about Atkins and paleo aren't all of these diets just a fancy way of saying keep your carbs low. Well it's definitely safe to say that you are limiting your carb intake in all of these diet plans but each plan calls for a slightly different approach to burning fat. Most ketogenic diets require you to keep your carbs under 30 grams a day and the most carbs that I've ever seen on a keto plan was 50 grams a day. Usually this will account for 5% of your total daily intake. Then you would have somewhere between 75 to 80 percent of your calories from fat. And finally 15 to 20 percent of your calories from protein. With ketogenic it's clear that the carbs are very limited at only 5 percent per day and the reason why carbs are so limited is because the ketogenic diet is trying to put you into ketosis. To sum it up simply ketosis is a state in which you're going to burn more

Ketoacidosis Associated With Low-carbohydrate Diet In A Non-diabetic Lactating Woman: A Case Report

Go to: Case presentation A 32-year-old white woman presented to our county hospital with a history of nausea, vomiting, heart palpitations, trembling and extremity spasms. She had started a strict LCHF diet, with an estimated carbohydrate intake of less than 20g per day, 10 days before admittance, lost 4 kilograms and had felt growing malaise. She was breastfeeding her son of 10 months of age. She continuously denied any alcohol or drug intake. She had a past medical history of hypothyreosis and had a family history of high blood pressure but not for diabetes. She took acetaminophen occasionally but no other medications. The initial examination in the emergency department revealed an unaffected woman with respiratory rate of 12 breaths per minute, oxygen saturation 96% on room air, body temperature 36.3°C, pulse 102 beats per minute and blood pressure of 110/80mmHg. Nothing abnormal was revealed on examination of her heart, lungs, abdomen and thyroid gland. An arterial blood gas was taken. It revealed pH 7.20, base excess (BE) −19, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) 2.8 kPa, glucose 3.8mmol/l and lactate 1.0mmol/l. Her blood ketones were 7.1mmol/l (reference 0 to 0.5mmol/ Continue reading >>

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  1. Liang-Hai Sie

    Type I diabetic will develop a ketoacidotic hyperglycemic diabetic coma, and die if not getting their insulin, type 2 diabetics will have (very) high blood glucose levels, but most won’t develop a ketoacidotic hyperglycemic diabetic coma. While this isn’t good for their health, they aren’t in immediate danger of dying.

  2. Satyabrat Mahali

    Of adults with diabetes, only 14% use insulin, 13% use insulin and oral medication, 57% take oral medication only, and 16% control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC.

  3. Mags Hussey

    Originally Answered: What would happen if a type 1 diabetic did not take their insulin for an extended period of time?

    A person with type 1 diabetes, depending on length of time since diagnosis, has essentially no insulin production. I say essentially nil, because studies have shown that winners of 50 year medals (surviving 50 years T1 is rare enough you get a national award, ceremony and medal), about 75% of those with the least diabetic complications have been found to have a little C-peptide production. That means their bodies still battle to keep producing beta cells (beta cells producing insulin and c-peptide being a cleavage product off insulin which is easily measurable) and their bodies immune system keep killing them off. I digress. Even those with tiny c-peptide production will die without insulin, the question is when. Days would be my estimate. C- peptide is also used a medication nowadays to prevent diabetes complications.
    I've had T1 30 years. If I omit insulin for 12 hours (background/basal and bolus) and eat regular foods, my blood glucose level would be over 33.3 mmol on the meter i.e. Unreadable. I would have very high blood ketones (which means acidic blood and cells not able to access glucose for energy so fat has broken down uncontrollably to feed the body instead causing an unwelcome acidic environment). and I would now require hospitalisation. If I took no insulin but went without food, specifically avoiding carbohydrates which drive glucose higher, I might make it to 2–3 days instead before needing hospitalidation as low carb can stop the body reaching such high blood glucose levels so quickly. But it would get to >33.3 mmol unreadable in 2–3 days regardless. Restabilisation isn't just a matter of taking insulin at that point. We are often tempted to take a giant stick of insulin to deal with ourselves but this is not advised.
    The body is too dehydrated, the blood is thick and acidic, pH as low as 6.9-7.0 (normal 7.4). Bicarbonate is low, Potassium and sodium electrolytes are imbalanced due to excess urination so hourly blood arterial gases for Co2, bicarbonate, pH and potassium are forced upon you. A saline IV perhaps with bicarbonate and /potassium is inserted depending on your blood results. An ekg is on you non stop as the potassium and sodium imbalance has wrecked your heart rhythm. Your input of fluid by IV and output by vomit (there's a lot of that) and urine is tallied up and tried to be balanced out. With the IV drip. Your kidneys might have shut down. Temporarily or permanently. It would seem obvious that The big concern is of course to lower your blood glucose, but done too rapidly or not at all and the brain tissue swells, causing brain injury, coma and death. Look up kisses for kycie, whose t1 diabetes was misdiagnosed and thus endured brain swelling and passed tragically 7 months later. This happens all too often. But it is the cause of death in 3% of known t1s. A bout of no insulin for 2–3 days whether accidental or purposeful can mean death, a stay in ICU, a week in hospital to correct slowly. It is an ugly way to die.
    There are early signs a person is not taking sufficient insulin if a person is not checking their glucose or hasn't access to a meter or is not yet diagnosed - heavy breathing, acetone breath, stomach pains, vomiting. Weight loss (I lose 3kg in one day of no insulin). Frequent urination, incessant drinking and thirst. Fatigue, lethargy, stupor, coma. Kids being out of sorts, not growing, wetting the bed, soaked diapers, moodiness in teens and adults.

    If you have diabetes, don't mess with your insulin. You dice with death but risk being brain injured, on dialysis or comatose forever.

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http://www.IntegratedHealthDenver.com - Denver Comprehensive Diabetes Care - Comprehensive Diabetes Care Denver. If you're looking for diabetes in Denver Colorado, Dr. Shane Steadman, DC and his team at Integrated Health Systems may be able to help you. We offer comprehensive diabetes care and specialize in tough conditions. Be sure to visit Dr. Steadman's website (listed above) for more information or contact his office today by calling (303) 781-5617. Important note: Do not discontinue any medication without consulting with your prescribing physician.

What Is Ketoacidosis? A Comprehensive Guide

Ketoacidosis is lethal. It is responsible for over 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the US with a mortality rate of around 5%. In other words, ketoacidosis is to blame for about 5,000 deaths per year. The cause? A deadly combination of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased ketone body levels in the blood (more on this deadly combination later). Luckily, this lethal triad rarely affects individuals who don’t have diabetes. However, the majority (80%) of cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with a known history of diabetes mellitus (any form of diabetes). Ketoacidosis vs. Diabetic Ketoacidosis — What’s The Difference? At this point, you may have noticed that I used ketoacidosis and diabetic ketoacidosis interchangeably. This is because it is difficult for the body to get into a state of ketoacidosis without the blood sugar control issues that are common in people with diabetes. Hence, the term diabetic ketoacidosis. (However, there is another form of ketoacidosis called alcoholic ketoacidosis. This occurs in alcoholics who had a recent alcohol binge during a period of time when they didn’t eat enough.) Ketoacidosis tends to occur the m Continue reading >>

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  1. walkerwally1

    Interpreting the ReliOn Ketone Test Strips

    I have been low carb, less than 25g/day, for the last week and was sure I was in ketosis but thought I would check with the ReliOn test strips from Walmart. My result was 40mg/dl on their chart which they call moderate. Everything I have read lists ketones as mmol and it is said ketosis is from 0.5 to 5.0 mmol. I thing 40mg/dl converts to about 2.2 mmol but I am not sure. If someone understands this better than me I would like to know if I am doing the conversion right.
    I am currently reading a book about Low Carb Living:
    The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable: Stephen D. Phinney, Jeff S. Volek: 9780983490708: Amazon.com: Books
    I think this is one of the best books I have found so far, not better than Dr. Bernstein's or Jenny Ruhl's, but a great compliment to the lchf WOE. It goes into great detail about the science of low carb and why it works and is more natural than our high carb diets. It is written to inform professionals and they invite you to give a copy to your Doctor. The link is to Amazon so you can get more info and see some of the reviews it has received. I have no connection to this book or authors other than being impressed.

  2. Steve3129

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by walkerwally1
    I have been low carb, less than 25g/day, for the last week and was sure I was in ketosis but thought I would check with the ReliOn test strips from Walmart. My result was 40mg/dl on their chart which they call moderate. Everything I have read lists ketones as mmol and it is said ketosis is from 0.5 to 5.0 mmol. I thing 40mg/dl converts to about 2.2 mmol but I am not sure. I use these strips as well, but the only thing they tell you is if you are spilling Ketones in the urine, excess Ketones at that. The color code really doesn't tell you more other than the darker the color, the more your kidneys are taking out of the blood.
    You have to get a special meter and strips to accurately measure blood Ketones, which is rather expensive and I'm not willing to buy. I'm satisfied to know that I'm producing Ketones by the excess production as indicated by the strip.

  3. MCS

    If your showing any color on the urine test strip your in ketosis.

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