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Ketosis And Interstitial Cystitis

Interstitial Cystitis: 5 Foods To Avoid

Interstitial Cystitis: 5 Foods To Avoid

Were you recently diagnosed and you are looking for foods to avoid for interstitial cystitis, also known as painful bladder syndrome. Whether you are recently diagnosed or have been coping for many years, you’re likely in a lot of pain. This chronic condition that involves your bladder leads to everything from intense bladder pressure to excruciating pain. When your bladder fills, nerves make signals to your brain letting you know that it’s time to visit the bathroom. But with interstitial cystitis, the nerve signals cross, and a person may feel he or she needs to urinate more frequently. Currently and unfortunately; there isn’t a cure for interstitial cystitis. However, wherever you are on the spectrum, know there is hope for you, the diet for IC doesn’t have to be all bad but there are some foods that you really need to stay away from if you want to be healthy & happy Medications and therapies can help you – but watching what you eat and drink can as well. It can be difficult to understand what not to eat when you have cystitis, but you can just read on to learn the 5 foods and drinks you should avoid when you have interstitial cystitis and begin to experience relief and comfort today. Here’s what foods to avoid when you have interstitial cystitis in no particular order: Interstitial Cystitis Foods To Avoid Sugar is one of the sneakiest culprits to inflaming your interstitial cystitis. Not only do sugary foods and drinks have absolutely no nutritional value, which your immune system needs to stay healthy and strong; but sugary foods put pressure on your adrenal system, which can lead to inflammation. Eating these foods and drinking sugary drinks threatens your immune system as well. So hold off on that diet soda and chocolate candy bar. Limit your intake o Continue reading >>

Cystitis Recurring, Interstitial Cystitis And Painful Bladder Syndrome

Cystitis Recurring, Interstitial Cystitis And Painful Bladder Syndrome

Cystitis (Recurrent) ,Interstitial Cystitis and Painful Bladder Syndrome Interstitial Cystitis (IC) or Painful Bladder Syndrome Interstitial cystitis affects 500,000 people in the UK, who are told that there is no cure for it and that they must live with it. Patients have often been on an exhausting route visiting GPs, urologists and gynaecologists. What is Interstitial Cystitis (IC)? Interstitial cystitis is a very uncomfortable and stressful disorder, which is characterized by chronic urinary urgency (feeling the need to urinate immediately) and frequency (frequent urination) with or without pelvic pain. Symptoms of interstitial cystitis may vary among individuals and may even vary with time in the same individual. Many people have to live life around their bladder because of the unpleasant symptoms. The term "cystitis" refers to any inflammation of the bladder. In contrast to bacterial cystitis, which results from an infection in the bladder, no infectious organism has been identified in people with interstitial cystitis. Interstitial cystitis is diagnosed when the symptoms occur without evidence for another cause of the symptoms. Although many theories have been put forward, the cause of IC is unknown. The theories for the cause of IC include the following: • Autoimmune: An autoimmune response is a physical response in which cells and antibodies of a person's body are directed against that person's own tissues. An autoimmune response to a bladder infection destroys the lining of the bladder wall. An unexplained association of IC has been found to exist with other autoimmune diseases. • Hereditary: Studies of mothers, daughters, and twins who have IC suggest a hereditary risk factor. However, no gene has yet been implicated as a cause of IC. • Mast cell abnorma Continue reading >>

Interstitial Cystitis…things That Help!

Interstitial Cystitis…things That Help!

“INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS SUMMARY & THINGS THAT HELP” This is how I approach an interstitial cystitis (IC) patient and some approaches that have consistently helped reduced pain and discomfort in these complex patients. HISTORY – I take a history of each decade . – Antibiotics – chronic infections with frequent antibiotic use several times per year Infections – ear, throat, sinuses, bronchitis, bladder, vaginal or stomach. – Stomach problems – irritable bowel, gas, bloating, pain, constipation, diarrhea – Birth control pill use – increases sex hormone binding globulin, can reduce free testosterone and effect vaginal pain – Menopausal or post menopause hormone status – vaginal dryness, painful intercourse, urinary incontinence – check for low DHEA, estrogen, testosterone – Trauma to that vaginal or bladder area (i.e. bicycling, horseback riding, sex, etc.) DIET HISTORY Cravings for – sweets, alcohol, coffee, dairy foods, cheese, bread products, spicy foods THINGS THAT HELP – Food Elimination – Eat from BED Diet List and… – Eliminate known aggravating foods – coffee/tea, spicy foods, alcohol, baked goods, dairy, wheat, sugar, alcohol, citrus, etc. or any foods you know that aggravate symptoms for at at least one month – Supplements – vitamin C TREAT THE GUT – Antibiotics if specific bacterial overgrowth is found and culture and sensitivity done – Antifungal treatment (or for intestinal bacterial overgrowth or parasites) – anti-fungal medicines (Fluconazole, Nystatin powder) – Antiparasite medications if parasite identified – Digestive aids some times – Food elimination – Herbs/botanicals like caprylic acid, berberine, plant tannins, uva ursi unless known to aggravate symptoms. – Probiotics HORMONES Testosterone / es Continue reading >>

Interstitial Cystitis (painful Bladder Syndrome)

Interstitial Cystitis (painful Bladder Syndrome)

A careful review of symptoms and a physical exam in a doctor’s office are generally the most important parts of diagnosing interstitial cystitis (IC). A health care professional will ask if you have a history of health problems that are related to IC. Urinary Diversion The urinary tract is the body’s drainage system for removing urine, which is composed of wastes and extra fluid. In order for normal urination to occur, all body parts in the urinary tract need to work together in the correct order. Continue reading >>

Diet For Interstitial Cystitis

Diet For Interstitial Cystitis

Interstitial Cystitis is an autoimmune condition where the immune system inflames the lining of the bladder and creates food sensitivities and allergies to certain acidic foods and supplements. This “misplaced immunity” thrives in an acidic terrain. This acidic environment is created throughout the years by a large refined carbohydrate diet of processed foods and sugars. This environment is further enhanced by the elevated toxic burden of heavy metals and chemicals, antibiotic usage and even stress. It stands to reason then that one of the key areas to address for this painful bladder syndrome is to alkalize the body and flush out all these lactic acid wastes. Consequently, a diet for Interstitial Cystitis becomes very important in order to facilitate this. Unfortunately, most urologists give lists of foods to avoid. These foods are not always triggers for everyone, however. When it comes to Interstitial Cystitis, what is one person’s nectar is another person’s poison. Therefore, a genetic food map is a hit and miss proposition, at best. And, what help is it, really, if you avoid certain foods and, yet, the remainder of your diet is mainly made up of the “Typical American Diet” of acidic foods? The most effective diet for Interstitial Cystitis that we have seen is called the 70-30 diet. It is a diet that is, primarily, 70% alkaline-producing foods and 30% acidic-producing foods. This simply means that every time you look down on your plate for breakfast, lunch or dinner, you should see approximately 70% alkaline-producing foods and 30% acidic producing foods. The basic science here is that acidity neutralizes alkalinity and alkalinity neutralizes acidity. You can’t expect to have effective results with IC if your daily diet is maintaining a condition of ac Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Uti-like Symptoms

Ketosis And Uti-like Symptoms

Every time I go into ketosis for more than I a week or two, my bladder gets irritated and I experience UTI-like symptoms. The last time I experienced this in ketosis, I ended up doing a round of antibiotics (big mistake), seeing a urologist, and getting my kidneys checked via ultrasound. The antibiotics didn't cure the discomfort, the urologist couldn't even find bacteria in my urine, and my kidneys checked out fine. The only thing that finally helped was when I discontinued my all meat and fat diet and took a month off from tea. I suspect that my bladder is just getting irritated by the ketones. Has anyone else experienced this? Any idea how to treat this? Continue reading >>

How Diet Might Trigger Ic Flares

How Diet Might Trigger Ic Flares

There are many theories as to why certain foods and beverages may trigger interstitial cystitis (IC) symptoms. Researchers are continuing to learn more about the underlying causes. There may be several factors leading to the sensitivity of substances found in food items. Here are the four leading theories on why what you eat might bother your IC: Irritate the Bladder Wall One theory thought to be a cause of IC symptoms is that a layer of the bladder wall is damaged. This area of the bladder may allow substances found in the urine to seep into the sensitive layers of tissue which make up the bladder wall. When urine that contains these substances hits these parts of the bladder, they become irritated. This irritation will cause a person with IC feel pain and discomfort after eating bothersome foods and beverages. Inflame Nerves Other scientists propose that IC may relate to a problem with the nervous system. Substances in certain foods and beverages may excite sensitive nerve endings found in the bladder. This may result in bladder symptoms. Provoke Increased Nerve Sensitivity People with IC appear to have higher levels of pain receptors that are sensitive to certain compounds in foods. For example, they may have more capsaicin receptors. Capsaicin is the substance found in peppers. The more capsaicin a pepper contains, the hotter it is! Bell peppers contain very small amounts of this substance. They usually do not flare IC symptoms. However, the peppers often used in Thai and Mexican dishes, contain higher amounts of capsaicin and these dishes may cause IC flares. Provoke Organ Cross Talk Researchers have also proposed that IC bladder pain may actually be due to pain in the large intestines that are in the same area of the body as the bladder. The scientists who suggest Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Ic Diet?

What Is The Keto Ic Diet?

The Keto IC diet is a combination of two diets: the IC diet and the Ketogenic diet. IC diet: Is a diet for people who have Interstitial Cystitis. It is generally an elimination diet of foods that are irritants to your bladder. You can find a general outline of what that looks like here. And more info on how to determine your IC diet. Ketogenic Diet: Is a low carb high fat (LCHF) diet. This diet became a popular treatment for epilepsy in the 1920s before there were any prescription medications to treat seizures. You can read a more in-depth history about the Ketogenic diet here. These days keto is often used for weight loss, as are most low carb and LCHF diets. But there has been studies that show it has other health benefits. I am not doing keto to lose weight. Although, my boyfriend, Aaron, lost 80lbs doing keto…so it works. But I am doing it as a healthy lifestyle change. I am using it as a way to cut processed foods and carbs from my diet and to basically try to improve my health. There are studies being done that show keto helps reduce migraines. There are studies being done that show keto helps reduce migraines. Since I have started this diet, I have met quite a few people with IC who are also on the Keto IC diet and have had a reduction in their pain. The goal is to reduce inflammation in the body. This is possible with the Keto and IC diets. I have drastically lost inflammation since starting this diet. My progress: I have drastically lost inflammation since starting this diet, approximately an inch of inflammation around my waistline and more around my face and neck. It is a noticeable difference. I have days where I have considerably less pain but I am still early on in the process. That being said the ketogenic diet is not for everyone. Please be sure to do Continue reading >>

Acidosis & Interstitial Cystitis

Acidosis & Interstitial Cystitis

It is currently estimated that anywhere from 4 to 12 million Americans suffer from a urinary condition known as interstitial cystits (IC) and two-thirds of these are women. IC involves scarring and inflammation of the bladder lining bringing about symptoms of urinary urgency, urinary frequency, and pelvic pain. Pain may vary in intensity as the bladder fills or empties with urine. For some the pain of IC is excruciating. Frequency of urination is not always related to bladder size and many people with IC have normal bladder capacity. Those with severe IC may urinate as many as 60 times a day and more than a dozen times a night. In women, symptoms are often reported to be worse during menstruation. In many cases these symptoms are severe and life-limiting. What are the Causes of Interstitial Cystitis? Although the causes of interstitial cystitis are not fully recognized, one theory suggests that its origins may lie in bladder scarring stemming from recurrent antibiotic use. No matter what the cause of this painful condition, in all cases IC involves inadequate bladder tissue repair, resulting in chronic inflammation of the bladder lining. Treating Interstitial Cystitis with the Alkaline for Life® Diet To date the search is still on for life-supporting, effective treatments for IC. A new therapy, however, pioneered by pH Sciences®, offers hope for IC suffers like Mary Smith. Mary was a client of mine who suffered from interstitial cystitis and because of this she had to plan her entire day around how close she would be to a bathroom. She often had to urinate more than 40 times a day. She endured frequent pain and near-constant urgency. Mary tried a variety of medications and watched her diet very closely, avoiding the foods she knew irritated her bladder. The medication Continue reading >>

The Interstitial Cystitis Diet

The Interstitial Cystitis Diet

Interstitial cystitis is a functional disorder and as such may have different causes. But most chronic orders are linked to diet and lifestyle to some degree. Our bodies need the right building blocks to carry out repair and maintenance functions. These building blocks are nutrients, found in natural foods. Prescription Weight Loss - Learn About Obesity Treatment Learn About an FDA-Approved Medication That May Help Chronic Weight Management. Prescription treatment website I generally recommend a primal/ancestral diet (as outlined in the recommendations for cystitis) to anyone who wants to optimize their health. People with interstitial cystitis can try this approach and see if it improves their symptoms. If these protocols are too restrictive for you and you only want to manage symptoms with diet, you can follow a standard Interstitial Cystitis diet and avoid the main trigger foods. However, because of the nature of this disorder and a possible link to autoimmunity, a stricter approach may be needed. The high amount of inflammation present calls for a high amount of healing. Luckily, there are already some successful strategies out there. The two protocols I can recommend for interstitial cystitis are the GAPS diet or the Autoimmune Paleo (AIP) protocol. Both protocols are designed to be extremely nutrient-dense, whilst being very soothing for the mucosal tissues of the body . I personally healed from interstitial cystitis on the GAPS diet but found that this protocol has some limitations. I therefore recommend the AIP protocol, which is backed by extensive research. How can AIP help Interstitial Cystitis? Supporting the health of the mucosal lining of both the bladder and the gut are of prime importance. Bone broth is one of the best foods to support the GAG layer of b Continue reading >>

How I Healed My Interstitial Cystitis

How I Healed My Interstitial Cystitis

Thank you for supporting this site with purchases made through links in this post. This is a personal post for me, not only because I had IC but because I know that this is an important article for many of you. I know that some of you have been waiting for me to write this so that you might learn something and get well! Of course, I’ll iterate here that I am not a health care practitioner; so I am simply sharing with you what worked for me. May you be so blessed as to find a naturopathic or functional medical doctor as insightful as the one I’ve found. I do, by the way, include his contact information further down in this article, for those of you who want to take advantage of his dietary recommendations. This article contains affiliate links. Thanks for your support of Eat Beautiful. Firstly, what is Interstitial Cystitis, for those who don’t know? The medical community considers IC an incurable bladder disease. The description of this disease from Web MD goes thus: Interstitial cystitis (IC), often called painful bladder syndrome, is a tricky condition. It’s tough to diagnose, and though treatments can make life with it better, there’s no cure. Because IC has such a wide range of symptoms and severity, most experts think it might be several diseases. If you have urinary pain that lasts for more than 6 weeks and is not caused by other conditions like infection or kidney stones, you may have IC. No matter what it’s called, interstitial cystitis symptoms bring a lot of challenges. The disease can affect your social life, exercise, sleep, and even your ability to work. Despite this, you can still arm yourself with facts and treatments to keep symptoms in check. (source) Some who have lived with IC symptoms manage them with a genuinely benign medication, meanin Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: What You Need To Know

The Ketogenic Diet: What You Need To Know

There is hardly a day that passes without seeing a new article popping up about the damage sugar and refined carbs can cause but only lately is the connection of sugar to obesity and metabolic disorders starting to be realized. Many people we know may have some weight problems or metabolic health conditions and follow some weight loss program—none of which seems to be effective in the long run. This makes sense. If any weight loss program had led to permanent weight loss, those using it could stop and the company promoting it would go out of business. Long-term (often life-long) membership is essential if one wants to avoid yoyo dieting. Lately, I see many people rushing to change from the Standard American Diet (SAD) to various new diets, such as the Low Carbs High Fat (LCHF) or the Ketogenic diets. Are all these “diets” for weight loss? Some people call these “fad” diets, but are they? There was a time when sugar covered cereals were called “fads” but look what has become of that fad! It has become our everyday SAD. Fad is “a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal: craze” (here). Sugar covered cereals have been with us for over 100 years, so definitely not a fad. What about the LCHF and the ketogenic Diets? Are they fads? Maybe, maybe not. Let’s dig a little deeper into the ketogenic diet since I consider the LCHF a less strict version of the ketogenic diet. Is the Ketogenic Diet a Fad? Looking at its history, “[ketogenic] dietary regimens have been used to treat epilepsy since at least 500 BC” (here). The ketogenic diet utilizes a metabolic process that can be awakened by fasting—though fasting is not necessary. “The ketogenic diet was introduced by modern physicians as a treatment for epilepsy in the 1920s” (here Continue reading >>

Bladder Pain From Ketosis?

Bladder Pain From Ketosis?

I've done a few google searches on this, and it tends to crop up a bit for people who are doing low carb. I eat alot of veggies with my meat and fat~ I'm getting quite a few carbs, but apparently not enough to keep my bladder from hating me. *sigh* Any tips to helping the inflammation in my bladder? I'm sure its because my body is throwing acid out like no tomorrow. (now if it would throw out the damn body fat!) Waiting to do my workout.. *sigh* maintenance man is here trying to scare out the birds that have been living in my wall. *WOOO* BEACHMOMMY1105 I have insulin resistance and chronic bladder, kidney, and urinary tract infections. I have gone to the urologist and had all the tests, thankfully I got a clean bill of healthy BUT he did say that i had two things going against me 1) I am a woman the "holes" tend to be "too close" together (sorry if tmi but that's why women get these more than men) 2)Diabetes/insulin resistance is a known common denominator. He suggested I start either drinking cranberry juice whcih I can't do bc of the insulin probs BUT I found some really awesome Cranberry pills it's bottled by AZO and it's just the cranberry supplement. I take 2-3 pills DAILY I love them!! I don't wanna jinx myself but for someone who had these infections monthly I haven't had one in 6 months. P.s. I am completing Day 2 of south beach diet phase 1. It'll be my last day doing it the low carb of it is really messing with me b/c I take insulin meds anyway (metformin) and I'm getting ill b/c hte carbs are too low. Hope this helps. 2137 days ago JUSTBIRDY I have never heard of this. Are you sure you are getting enough water? I find that when I eat tons of protein I don't feel as well as when I lower the protein and raise the fat. 2146 days ago ANGELIA.R My husband gets go Continue reading >>

Interstitial Cystitis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Interstitial Cystitis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic painful bladder syndrome in which there is the presence of pelvic pain, bladder pain or pressure, and urinary frequency or urgency. The pain can range in severity from mild to severe. It affects approximately 4-12 million people in the US alone, most of whom are women. The condition can affect anyone regardless of age, race, gender or ethnicity, however.1-3 Contents of this article: You will also see introductions at the end of some sections to any recent developments that have been covered by MNT's news stories. Also look out for links to information about related conditions. Here are some key points about interstitial cystitis. More detail and supporting information is in the main article.1-3 Those with IC have chronic urinary tract symptoms lasting more than 6 weeks in duration. Infection has not been identified as the cause of IC. IC affects around 4-12 million people in the US. At times, people with IC may also have concurrent irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia and other pain syndromes. Physical or emotional stressors can worsen the symptoms of IC. Most people with IC are diagnosed aged 30 and above. This Knowledge Center article will focus specifically on interstitial cystitis. Click on the link here for an article on common cystitis. What is interstitial cystitis? Interstitial cystitis is also commonly referred to as painful bladder syndrome (PBS), bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and chronic pelvic pain (CPP).2,3 IC is not a "one size fits all" diagnosis and currently has two recognizable subtypes:2 Ulcerative IC: a subtype of IC that is characterized by red, bleeding patches on the walls of the bladder, called Hunner's ulcers - it affects approximately 5-10% of those diagnosed with IC Non-ulcerative IC: this subtype of IC Continue reading >>

The Autoimmune Protocol Vs. Other Healing Diets

The Autoimmune Protocol Vs. Other Healing Diets

This post contains affiliate links. Click here to see what that means! One of the most common questions I get about the Autoimmune Protocol is “Why should I do AIP instead of a ketogenic diet, GAPS, SCD, low-FODMAP, or the Candida Diet?” or “Should I do AIP with SCD/low-FODMAPs etc.?” With this article, I am going to share with you the differences between these approaches, and why you should or shouldn’t layer them (or use them instead of!) the AIP. Low-Carb or Ketogenic Diet A low-carb diet has a few variations, but the biggest distinction is whether or not the amount of carbs one eats is enough to put one into ketosis or not. This is a state where the body relies on ketones as well as glucose to produce energy, and is achieved by eating less than 30-50 grams of carbohydrate per day. This threshold is individual—some people are able to achieve ketosis with a higher level of carbs, others need to eat less. Most people consider a diet that is between ketosis and 100 grams of carbohydrate per day a low carb diet (depending who you talk to—I’m certainly not an expert here!). Some practitioners say to try low-carb or ketogenic diets because they have been shown to be effective against neurological disorders as well as some types of cancer. Others have better success with weight loss or regaining insulin sensitivity with this approach. There has been much heated debate in the Paleo community about what carb intake is optimal for good health, and if we even need carbs at all. Some believe that a ketogenic diet is optimal for everyone, while others believe that it is necessary to eat carbohydrates, and that ketogenic diets need only be used in specific circumstances. Dr. Sarah Ballantyne writes in The Paleo Approach that studies of those using ketogenic diets a Continue reading >>

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