diabetestalk.net

Ketosis And Brain Function

How To Create A Diet That Enhances Brain Function: The Role Of A Ketogenic Diet In Alzheimer’s Disease And Cognitive Decline – An Interview With Andrea Glaser, Rd, Ld

How To Create A Diet That Enhances Brain Function: The Role Of A Ketogenic Diet In Alzheimer’s Disease And Cognitive Decline – An Interview With Andrea Glaser, Rd, Ld

Kirk’s video overview of his interview with Andrea Glaser, RD, LD (13:20 min) Andrea Glaser is a licensed registered dietician at Resilient Health in Austin, Texas, working in partnership with supervising physician Sharon Hausman-Cohen, MD, on a dietary approach to improve cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease patients, with collaboration from Dale Bredesen, MD, neurologist, creator of the Bredesen Protocol™, and author of the newly released best selling book “The End of Alzheimer’s Disease“. This therapeutic dietary approach creates a mild ketosis which is beneficial to cognitive function and brain repair, and maintains a significant reduction in insulin secretion and need, as well as reduced blood sugar levels. This diet differs from many popular ketogenic diets in that it strives to keep cardiovascular risk low, or in check, by keeping animal fats low (saturated fat) while increasing unprocessed plant-based fats and foods to assist in creating the ketosis. The diet is a whole food diet with an emphasis on reducing saturated fat, especially in ApoE4 genotypes; a liberalization of “healthy” vegetable fats, and fats from nuts and fish; a reduction or elimination of complexed healthy carbohydrates (legumes, sweat potatoes, squash, except whole soy foods like edamame and tofu which can be consumed liberally if non-sensitive); elimination of all grains and processed/refined carbohydrates and free sugars; a HIGH intake of non-starchy vegetables, especially GREENS; black coffee and tea are encouraged (without sweeteners) all in an effort to maintain a mild ketosis measured as a beta-hydroxybutyrate level between .5-2.0 mM, while also maintaining fasting insulin levels below 4.5, keeping fasting blood sugars between 70-90, and a hemoglobin A1c < 5.6. Ms. Gl Continue reading >>

Ketosis Supports Good Brain Function

Ketosis Supports Good Brain Function

The ketogenic diet has been used since the 1920s as a proven medical therapy for epilepsy control. Nutritionist today consider burning ketones to be a much “cleaner” way to stay energized compared to running on carbs and sugar. Following a keto menu plan, your fat storing hormone levels drop greatly which turns your body into a fat burning machine. Studies have shown that this kind of nutritional approach has a solid physiological and biochemical basis. After reaching a state of ketosis, you'll be amazed at how much energy you have, and chronic fatigue symptoms should get better. Ketone bodies have been shown to be beneficial in stabilizing neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, which can also result in better mood control. An effective keto diet for weight loss should be based on real food. One of the most efficient ways to train your body to use fat for fuel is to remove most of the sugars and starches from your diet. Protein can induce an insulin response in the body when consumed in high amounts, so you want just the right amount in your menu plan. Fat is what makes you feel full or satiated, gives you energy when in ketosis, and satisfies your taste buds. Healthy fats include saturated fats, monounsaturated fats and certain types of polyunsaturated fats, especially omega-3 fatty acids. A common mistake on a low-carb, high-fat diet is being fooled by creative marketing like special “low-carb” foods. Eating a healthy high-fat, low-carbohydrate menu plan filled with real foods and moderate to low proteins, which allows your body to enter nutritional ketosis. It can take 3 to 4 days to reach ketosis based on your normal exercise regimen. To learn more about how a personalized menu plan can help you lose weight and keep it off forever, contact a Metab Continue reading >>

Ketosis To Improve Brain Function

Ketosis To Improve Brain Function

Ketones as a fuel source can make you smarter, more creative, less hungry, boost energy levels, and help you lose weight. You may have heard of ketosis in the context of fat loss and dieting. It’s been popular and infamous in the dieting world to varying degrees since Dr Atkins told everyone to overdose on bacon. Ketosis is a natural state when your body is using fat as fuel instead of glucose. Your body and brain use blood sugar (glucose) as the first source of fuel, but can easily be adapted to utilise a second source of fuel, ketones, when your glucose stores run out. Ketones are made in the liver from fat. Ketones then move around your body and are used by your body and brain as fuel. When your body is in ketosis, it becomes a fat burning machine, which is obviously great if you have fat to lose, but even if you don’t, you might find you feel better fuelling your brain with ketones, at least for some of the time. Your body shifts into ketosis in a number of ways, the most commonly known way is through eating a low-carb diet, which can be difficult for some people to stick to. Another way is through fasting and certain dietary supplements can assist with entering a “keto” state. Since we’re all about making life easier and better, we’ll share the easiest and least disruptive ways to test your brain and body in ketosis. It’s important to point out that being able to use fat for fuel is an important survival mechanism. The body can only store glucose for about two days. After that it could eat away your muscles to produce more glucose, but a more efficient fuel source is to turn fat into ketones. Our clever little brains and bodies adapted to ensure survival with fat stores that can last for weeks (if not months), without topping up on carbs. More researc Continue reading >>

How Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets Boost Brain Health

How Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets Boost Brain Health

Low-carb and ketogenic diets have many health benefits. For example, it is well known that they can cause weight loss and help fight diabetes. However, they are also beneficial for certain brain disorders. This article explores how low-carb and ketogenic diets affect the brain. Although there is a lot of overlap between low-carb and ketogenic diets, there are also a few important differences. Ketogenic diet: Carbs are limited to 50 grams or less per day. A major goal is to increase blood levels of ketones, molecules that can partly replace carbs as an energy source for the brain. Low-carb diet: Protein is usually not restricted. Ketones may or may not rise to high levels in the blood. On a ketogenic diet, the brain is mainly fueled by ketones. These are produced in the liver when carb intake is very low. On a standard low-carb diet, the brain will still be largely dependent on glucose, although it may burn more ketones than on a regular diet. Low-carb and ketogenic diets are similar in many ways. However, a ketogenic diets contains even fewer carbs, and will lead to a significant rise in blood levels of ketones. You may have heard that your brain needs 130 grams of carbs per day to function properly. This is one of the most common myths about low-carb diets. In fact, a report by the US Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board states: "The lower limit of dietary carbohydrates compatible with life apparently is zero, provided that adequate amounts of protein and fat are consumed." Although a zero-carb diet isn't recommended because it eliminates many healthy foods, you can definitely eat much less than 130 grams per day and maintain good brain function. It is a common myth that you need to eat 130 grams of carbs per day to provide the brain with energy. Low-carb d Continue reading >>

What Is The Effect Of Ketosis On The Brain?

What Is The Effect Of Ketosis On The Brain?

Brad Brown: Welcome to another edition of the LCHF podcast, got a question in from Heidi today. Joining us from Tasmania in Australia is Dr Gary Fettke. Heidi’s question, an interesting one, it’s about ketosis and ketones in particular. She wanted to know, are there any studies that have been done in the effect on ketosis on the brain, both short and long term. She’s been following a LCHF for about 12 days now, she says it’s going fairly well. She just feels that she’s getting a bit slower mentally, so to speak. She also performs worse at mental exercises since she started the LCHF diet and she wants to know, does it take some time for the brain to adapt to this new way of eating? The last thing she wants to know is will it compromise her long term mental health? [membership] Giving up sugar will naturally have an initial impact on the brain Gary Fettke: I think the most important thing you stated there is that Heidi has been doing this for 12 days. So presumably she’s going through a whole transition of low carbohydrate. It’s hard to work out exactly how far she’s actually going and how hard she is at it. But a lot of people when they first give up sugar feel that whole state of agitation and they may get irritability, but that’s probably coming off the sugar. The long term effects of ketosis are very, very good for the brain. If she hangs in there she will probably find that her concentration will improve quite significantly. There are quite a few studies out there and a lot of research being done on exactly what Heidi is questioning. That’s the role of ketosis in brain function and in particular in relationship to dementia, Parkinson’s and epilepsy. A long standing method of management of epilepsy and in fact was the original management of epile Continue reading >>

Kegenix For Brain Health And Focus

Kegenix For Brain Health And Focus

Work 1 Serving 1 hour before work 1 Serving 1 hour after lunch or KETO MEAL School 1 Serving 1 hour before study or test Anti-Aging 1 Serving in the morning 1 Serving at 12pm 1 Serving at 4pm ORDER Work 2 Scoops for Lunch School 2 Scoops for Lunch Anti-Aging 2 Scoops for Lunch or 1 Scoop for Dinner ORDER ORDER The ketogenic has had numerous studies done, showing the benefits of a low-carb diet on brain health. It has been shown to effectively treat Epilepsy in children, reduce healing time after a head injury, improve symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease, reduce neuron death caused in hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes, and slow the progression of Alzheimer’s in mice. It is thought that using fat for fuel, which the body prefers as its primary fuel source, is beneficial to your neurons. It helps them run more efficiently, avoiding exhaust which leads to cell death. Have you ever noticed that when you have a typical high carb breakfast, of oatmeal, fruit, and toast, and feel tired, sluggish, and may experience brain fog in just a few short hours? This is caused by your body using a less beneficial fuel source in the form of glucose. But we don’t have to suffer through life like this, counting down the minutes until our next “sugar fix” in the form of carbs. That is where ketosis comes in. Ketosis is the natural metabolic state where the body burns fat, rather than glucose (sugar), for its primary energy. Ketosis is an advanced metabolic state because burning fat offers the body 225% more energy than carbohydrates. Getting into a state of ketosis isn’t easy though. Because of our conventional diet, which relies on easily burned carbs, our body is accustomed to having an overabundance of glucose at its disposal. So, when you are no longer providing your b Continue reading >>

Powerful Role Of Ketone Fats In Brain Health And Alzheimer’s Treatment

Powerful Role Of Ketone Fats In Brain Health And Alzheimer’s Treatment

Brain cells function with far greater efficiency when they are utilizing fat (ketones) as a fuel source as opposed to sugar. The exciting news is that scientists are now taking advantage of this finding in the actual treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, as you can see in this recent research publication. This research clearly substantiates the health benefits of a low-carb, high-fat diet as a powerful lifestyle change to achieve the goal of brain health and functionality. While there actually exists a pharmaceutical “medical food” based on the science explained in this report, you can boost the availability of ketones for your brain by simply adding coconut oil or MCT oil to your daily regimen. But to make this effective, carb restriction is a must! Alzheimer’s now affects some 5.4 million Americans. It is my belief that this dietary approach may well go a long way to keeping the brain healthy and allowing us to remain free of this dreaded condition. Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets And Brain Function

Low-carb Diets And Brain Function

How you eat affects virtually every aspect of your health, including the health of your brain. And while a well-designed low-carb plan should supply all the nutrients you need for healthy brain functioning, you've likely heard that lack of carbs decreases your brainpower. That seems to be true for some people, but other evidence suggests that eating low-carb might have a neutral or even positive impact on your brain function. Video of the Day Carbohydrates and Your Brain If you've ever been told to carb-load for a game, race or a tough workout, you know carbs are key for boosting your energy. Your body turns them into glucose, which also directly fuels your brain. Your brain cells can actually only use glucose for energy, which makes carbs absolutely essential for powering brain function. That's not the only way carbs affect brain function, though. Eating carbohydrates signals for your brain to produce serotonin, a hormone that's involved in mood regulation, appetite control and the sleep cycle. That may be one reason that carbs are considered "comfort food" and why you might crave carb-rich foods when you're upset or stressed. Can a Low-Carb Diet Diminish Brain Function? Low-carb diets have a bad reputation for affecting your brain function. And it makes sense -- because your brain needs carbs for energy, lowering your carb intake might affect your brainpower. You might experience fuzziness or "brain fog" if you're not getting enough carbs through your diet or have trouble concentrating due to general fatigue from lack of carbs. Researchers have looked into this effect in low-carb dieters. One study, from a 2009 issue of Appetite, examined the effects of a low-carb weight-loss diet on brain function in study subjects during their first three weeks on the diet. They fou Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet – What’s All The Fuss About?

The Ketogenic Diet – What’s All The Fuss About?

In the world of fitness and weight-loss, the ketogenic diet is the new kid on the block. Rumour has it, it’s key to optimizing fat-loss, strength and curbing our appetite. But how much of this is true? Or could this high-fat, low-carb diet be just another trend? The good news is – you’re about to find out. First things first: What is a ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet means that you get approximately 75% of your daily energy from (healthy) fats, 20% from protein and only 5% from carbohydrates (mainly vegetables) – which basically means only between 30g-50g of carbs per day. (This would translate into one single cup of rice or two slices of whole wheat bread per day). What does “ketogenic” mean? This one’s for all the geeks out there: Ketogenic comes from the word “Ketosis”, the name of a metabolic process your body goes through to produce enough energy to keep the engine running. It happens when we don’t have enough glucose from carbohydrates for energy production and our body then has to use fats to generate energy – also known as beta-oxidation. We do this on a daily basis, for example when we sleep. In this process, fatty acids are broken down into acetyl-CoA, which is an essential molecule in energy transfer. Nevertheless, if the body has mainly only fats for energy production, it will come to a metabolic traffic jam, as not all acetyl-CoA can be used for energy production. Acetyl-CoA builds up. And this build up of acetyl-CoA shifts the liver into ketone body formation. And here we are: if the body has more ketone bodies than normal, it is in “ketosis”. These ketone bodies – acetone, acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate – can be reconverted into acetyl-CoA when energy is required to help supply the muscle tissue, the brain and red blo Continue reading >>

These Mice Stopped Eating Carbs So You (maybe) Don't Have To

These Mice Stopped Eating Carbs So You (maybe) Don't Have To

In the ever-more masochistic world of wellness-boosting, pound-shedding diets, the latest trend involves putting your body into a controlled state of starvation known as “ketogenesis,” by cutting out nearly all carbs. If that doesn’t sound like your particular brand of torture, guess what? You’re already on it. Well, at least while you’re sleeping. Two independent studies published Tuesday in the journal Cell Metabolism raise hopes that ketogenic diets, if followed full-time, do more than just slim waists. They also appear to improve the odds of living longer and remembering better … if you’re a mouse. The same effects have yet to be proven in humans, and plans for that are in the works. But in the meantime, self-experimenting biohackers (i.e. dieters) are collecting anecdotal evidence all around the world. Every time you wake up from a solid snooze and exhale out the fiery iron breath of a thousand rotting apple cores, that’s the taste of the “keto” lifestyle. That smell is acetone, and a little bit of it in the morning is a normal sign of a healthy metabolism. Over millennia, humans evolved a backup energy production system, for when glucose—your body’s main fuel source—gets depleted. Like during a famine, or just a good long nap. The goal of keto diets is to switch your body over to to this alternative metabolic pathway not just at night, but during your waking hours as well. By limiting carbs to just a few grams per day, your body begins to rely on its fat stores instead, and voila, epic weight loss. That works pretty well for things like your heart and lungs and muscles. But your brain—that electrical power suck, which consumes about a quarter of your daily calories—can’t burn fats. So in the absence of glucose, it snacks on somethin Continue reading >>

How Ketogenic Diets Curb Inflammation In The Brain

How Ketogenic Diets Curb Inflammation In The Brain

Ketogenic diets – extreme low-carbohydrate, high-fat regimens that have long been known to benefit epilepsy and other neurological illnesses – may work by lowering inflammation in the brain, according to new research by UC San Francisco scientists. The UCSF team has discovered a molecular key to the diet’s apparent effects, opening the door for new therapies that could reduce harmful brain inflammation following stroke and brain trauma by mimicking the beneficial effects of an extreme low-carb diet. “It's a key issue in the field – how to suppress inflammation in the brain after injury,” said Raymond Swanson, MD, a professor of neurology at UCSF, chief of the neurology service at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and senior author of the new study. In the paper, published online Sept. 22 in the journal Nature Communications, Swanson and his colleagues found the previously undiscovered mechanism by which a low-carbohydrate diet reduces inflammation in the brain. Importantly, the team identified a pivotal protein that links the diet to inflammatory genes, which, if blocked, could mirror the anti-inflammatory effects of ketogenic diets. “The ketogenic diet is very difficult to follow in everyday life, and particularly when the patient is very sick,” Swanson said. “The idea that we can achieve some of the benefits of a ketogenic diet by this approach is the really exciting thing here.” Low-Carb Benefits The high-fat, low-carbohydrate regimen of ketogenic diets changes the way the body uses energy. In response to the shortage of carb-derived sugars such as glucose, the body begins breaking down fat into ketones and ketoacids, which it can use as alternative fuels. In rodents, ketogenic diets – and caloric restriction, in general – are Continue reading >>

Ketones To Combat Alzheimer’s Disease

Ketones To Combat Alzheimer’s Disease

Despite decades of efforts to develop a drug that prevents or cures Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most prevalent form of dementia afflicting our aging population, there is currently no treatment for this devastating condition. Emerging research suggests that such a miracle treatment might already exist, not in the form of a pill, but as a simple dietary change. A growing number of studies report that interventions to improve metabolic health can alleviate symptoms and reduce brain pathology associated with AD. A popular theory posits that AD has multiple causes, but their common thread may involve metabolic dysfunction. Indeed, markers of poor metabolic health, such as diabetes, inflammation and high cholesterol, are major risk factors for AD. Just like our muscles, the brain requires energy to function properly. Both neurons and muscles have the unique capacity to metabolize ketones as an alternative fuel source when glucose is in short supply, for instance during fasting or on a low-carbohydrate diet. In the 1920s scientists discovered that a high fat diet promoting ketogenesis controlled epilepsy, and ketosis remains one of the most effective treatments for the condition. This raised the possibility that ketones may also be neuroprotective against other diseases that stem from aberrant neural metabolism, such as AD. Since then, research has confirmed that ketones do in fact alter brain metabolism in ways that reduce neuropathology and relieve behavioral symptoms. Ketones alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease Over the past decade, several studies have supported the clinical value of ketosis in cognitively impaired patients. In a 2004 study twenty individuals with AD or Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) were treated with placebo or medium chain triglycerides, a t Continue reading >>

Brain, Livin' On Ketones - A Molecular Neuroscience Look At The Ketogenic Diet

Brain, Livin' On Ketones - A Molecular Neuroscience Look At The Ketogenic Diet

Edited October 3, 2013: A 2.0 version of this post can be found at Scientific American MIND Guest blogs, here. And here's me talking about it. Feel free to check it out! Remember when your high school biology teacher said that the brain absolutely NEEDS glucose to function? Well, that’s not entirely true. Under severe carbohydrate restriction, the brain can adapt and start burning ketones as fuel. Originally devised as a therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy in children, the ketogenic diet (keto) has been gaining popularity lately. It’s a high fat, moderate protein and low carbohydrate diet (LCHF) designed to force the body to go into a state called metabolic ketosis. With the advent of books like “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat”, LCHF diets are increasingly touted as the magic bullet to weight loss. While there is considerable interest in the medical community in using the ketogenic diet to manage metabolic syndrome or prevent cardiovascular disease, more attention has focused on its role in drug-resistant seizure management and (potentially) neuroprotective effects in brain damage. In the last decade, keto has been shown to improve memory in patients at risk for Alzheimer’s disease, stabilize mood in type II bipolar disorder, reduce symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and even ameliorate some behavioral and social deficits in autism. Keto also seems to decrease brain cancer progression. ALL without observable side effects. Although most of these studies were unblinded (hence placebo can’t be ruled out), the effect is still amazing. What is going on in the brain? And why aren’t pharmaceutical companies racing to package keto into a convenient treat-all 3-a-day pill? How does the body go into ketosis? Source: Simple speaking, strict carbo Continue reading >>

Ketosis Makes Your Brain Work Better

Ketosis Makes Your Brain Work Better

Every morning for the last four and a half months, I’ve broken off a large chunk of grass fed butter (usually around 50 grams or just over three tablespoons) and a couple tablespoons of coconut oil and thrown them in a blender with my morning coffee. You might have heard of this idea, dubbed ‘bulletproof coffee’ and created by a guy called Dave Asprey. 1 (this essay was originally posted at Aaron’s blog HERE) You might ask why the hell somebody might want to put butter in their coffee, but all you’d be proving is that you haven’t tried it (because it tastes amazing) and according to Dave Asprey, apparently will help make you healthier, feel better, perform better, think better – everything short of give you superpowers. Now, I didn’t want to like Dave Asprey… he’s just a little bit too charming – especially once you realize he’s created a whole line of supplements and other consumables that meet his extra-special toxin-free super-executive standards. I tried his upgraded mycotoxin free coffee beans and didn’t notice any difference between them and any other local fancy-shmancy coffee I’ve purchased since – not that I doubt that some people are more sensitive to these toxins, I just didn’t notice a difference. Nevertheless, I do like him. He does a good podcast and he clued me into something that I previously would have thought was completely insane, but now am starting to think is key to keep my brain working optimally – eating a high fat diet. A diet that is high in fat (60-70% of calories), is almost by definition low in carbs, and this means that when eating a high fat diet, it is likely that one is at least partially and some of the time in a state of ketosis. For those of you who don’t know, ketosis is what it is called when the Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: 25 Proven Benefits And How To Know If It’s Right For You

Ketogenic Diet: 25 Proven Benefits And How To Know If It’s Right For You

The ketogenic diet has been touted for its many health benefits such as weight loss, cognitive function, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In this post, we cover: Different ways to get into ketosis Physiology and pathways that are changed when you are in ketosis, which explains how the ketogenic diet derives its benefits Genetic factors that may affect the safety and effectiveness of ketosis 17 Health conditions that may be helped by the ketogenic diet Negative effects of ketosis and how to mitigate them Ketogenic Diets Improve Cognitive Function and Brain Health Ketogenic Diet as a Cancer Treatment Ketogenic diets are defined by a low carbohydrate (typically under 50 grams/day) and high fat intake, leading to an elevation of free fatty acids and ketone bodies in the blood (R). The first ketogenic diets in the medical literature are noted in publications in the 1920s, although wider popularity and increased research was not seen in medical literature until the 1960s (R). Variations of the diets have remained popular for the past 20-30 years, with proponents claiming that the diets boost weight loss and energy while offering protection from certain metabolic diseases (R). A ketogenic diet and fasting affect the body similarly. Both deplete the body’s glucose reserves, so the body starts turning fatty acids into ketones (R). When the body doesn’t have enough carbohydrates from food, it burns fat by producing ketones or ketone bodies (R, R). In non-diabetics, ketosis can be achieved in 3 ways, i.e. Fasting or severe caloric restriction (R) Prolonged physical exercise in fasted state, depending on intensity and duration (R, R2) Nutritional ketosis, i.e. by consuming a very low carbohydrate diet Supplementation, such as by supplementing with medium chain triglyceri Continue reading >>

More in ketosis