diabetestalk.net

Ketosis And Blood Pressure

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores. This can be rectified by supplementing with a good electrolyte or increasing the sodium in your diet. However KETO//OS adds additional sodium to the formulation to counter-act this sodium depletion. The first signs of dehydration or too much caffeine are fatigue, headache, dizziness, dry mouth, swollen tongue, possible elevation of blood pressure, palpitations or muscle cramping. If this occurs, decrease your serving size of uncharged Keto//OS/Max, drink plenty of water throughout the day. If you experience any of these symptoms of dehydration, please discontinue the use of Keto//OS for 24-28hours and hydrate. Then, it is recommended that you use the uncharged version of Keto//OS 3.0/Max, start with a reduced servings the first few day, stay well hydrated and continue to monitor your blood pressure daily or as recommended by your health care physician. In addition, continue to monitor your potassium, magnesium, calcium and sodium level at your routine check ups with your physician. Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Blood Pressure By Changing Your Diet

6 Ways To Lower Blood Pressure By Changing Your Diet

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is a serious and common condition that can lead to life-threatening diseases such as heart attack, stroke, heart or kidney failure, and more. While 1 in 3 American adults have high blood pressure, this condition only affects 3% or less of hunter-gatherer populations that are following a traditional diet and lifestyle. (1, 2) This would suggest that hypertension is a disease of poor lifestyle choices, and one that can be effectively treated using simple diet and behavior changes, as well as strategic use of herbal remedies. Blood pressure is measured by two numbers: the top number is the systolic pressure (when the heart is pumping blood) and the bottom number is the diastolic pressure (when the heart is at rest). A normal blood pressure number is below 120/80, prehypertension is diagnosed between 120/80 – 139/89, Stage 1 hypertension is between 140/90 – 159/99, and Stage 2 hypertension is blood pressure above 160/100. While most doctors prescribe drug treatment when a patient has reached the prehypertension stage, there is no evidence to support pharmaceutical treatment in these patients. (3) But this doesn’t mean hypertension shouldn’t be addressed. Much like high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure (even in the prehypertension stage) is a sure sign of other problems going on in the body. By addressing underlying issues with diet and lifestyle changes, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure without resorting to drug treatment. This article will address Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Lowers Blood Pressure

Low-carb Diet Lowers Blood Pressure

Jan. 25, 2010 -- A low-carbohydrate diet may have health benefits that go beyond weight loss. A new study shows that a low-carbohydrate diet was equally good as the weight loss drug orlistat (the active ingredient in Alli and Xenical) at helping overweight and obese people lose weight, but people who followed the low-carb diet also experienced a healthy drop in their blood pressure levels. "I expected the weight loss to be considerable with both therapies but we were surprised to see blood pressure improve so much more with the low-carbohydrate diet than with orlistat," researcher William S. Yancy, Jr., MD, an associate professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center, says in a news release. "If people have high blood pressure and a weight problem, a low-carbohydrate diet might be a better option than a weight loss medication." Researchers say studies have already shown that the two weight loss methods are effective at promoting weight loss, but it's the first time the health effects of each have been compared head to head. "It's important to know you can try a diet instead of medication and get the same weight loss results with fewer costs and potentially fewer side effects," Yancy says. In the study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, 146 obese or overweight adults were randomly divided into two groups. Many of the participants also had chronic health problems, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. The first group was advised to follow a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet consisting of less than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, and the second group received the weight loss drug orlistat three times a day, plus counseling in following a low-fat diet (less than 30% of daily calories from fat) at group meetings over 48 weeks. The results showed we Continue reading >>

10 Health Benefits Of Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets

10 Health Benefits Of Low-carb And Ketogenic Diets

Low-carb diets have been controversial for decades. They were originally demonized by fat-phobic health professionals and the media. People believed that these diets would raise cholesterol and cause heart disease because of the high fat content. However... times are changing. Since the year 2002, over 20 human studies have been conducted on low-carb diets. In almost every one of those studies, low-carb diets come out ahead of the diets they are compared to. Not only does low-carb cause more weight loss, it also leads to major improvements in most risk factors... including cholesterol. Here are the 10 proven health benefits of low-carb and ketogenic diets. Hunger is the single worst side effect of dieting. It is one of the main reasons why many people feel miserable and eventually give up on their diets. One of the best things about eating low-carb is that it leads to an automatic reduction in appetite (1). The studies consistently show that when people cut carbs and eat more protein and fat, they end up eating much fewer calories. In fact... when researchers are comparing low-carb and low-fat diets in studies, they need to actively restrict calories in the low-fat groups to make the results comparable (2). When people cut carbs, their appetite tends to go down and they often end up eating much fewer calories without trying. Cutting carbs is one of the simplest and most effective ways to lose weight. Studies show that people on low-carb diets lose more weight, faster, than people on low-fat diets... even when the low-fat dieters are actively restricting calories. One of the reasons for this is that low-carb diets tend to get rid of excess water from the body. Because they lower insulin levels, the kidneys start shedding excess sodium, leading to rapid weight loss in the Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is a ketogenic diet safe for you? Is a ketogenic diet safe? Before you try this at home… First and foremost, if you pick up a copy of Jimmy Moore and Dr. Eric Westman’s excellent new book, Keto Clarity (which I highly recommend–see my review here) and feel (understandably) inspired to immediately embark on a ketogenic diet, I would caution anyone with a serious chronic health problem, especially anyone who is taking prescription medications, not to attempt a ketogenic diet on his/her own without medical supervision. Medications and Early Ketosis Even though I personally believe in the power of ketogenic diets to improve and even reverse many chronic illnesses, from diabetes to chronic fatigue to mood disorders, the diet does this by causing very real shifts in body chemistry that can have a major impact on medication dosages and side effects, especially during the first few weeks. Examples of problematic situations include sudden drops in blood pressure for those on blood pressure medications (such as Lasix, Lisinopril, and Atenolol), and sudden drops in blood sugar for those on diabetes medications (especially insulin). These changes in blood pressure and blood sugar are very positive and healthy, but the presence of medications can artificially intensify these effects and cause extreme and sometimes dangerous reactions unless your dosage is carefully monitored by you and your clinician in the first month or so. Another important example of a medicine that would require careful monitoring is Lithium, an antidepressant and mood stabilizing medicine. The ketogenic diet causes the body to let go of excess water during the first few days, which can cause Lithium to become more concentrated in the blood, potentially rising to uncomfortable or even toxic levels. These Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure And The Low Carbohydrate Diet

High Blood Pressure And The Low Carbohydrate Diet

Hello, fellow low carbers. It’s nice to be back. I am now married, so you will notice a name change. I will now be able to add new articles to “The Nurse Is In” on a regular basis. There will be a new one every two weeks, so please keep those questions coming. I will be answering them individually, as well as taking a few of them and expanding them into articles. I decided to pick out a question on high blood pressure and the low carbohydrate diet for this article. The question has been asked several times by different people, and I think that it’s an important one. Can A Low Carbohydrate Diet Cause High Blood Pressure? There are many things that happen to your body to cause your blood pressure to increase. I have been asking this question of physicians that I know, and the consensus is that they feel that obesity is a much greater risk factor than any diet. They would prefer that their patients lost the weight on a low carbohydrate diet and just monitored their blood pressure to make sure that it did not get dangerously high. There was also a general consensus that they actually saw their patients’ blood pressures decrease when they followed a low carbohydrate regime. What About Salt? Standard medical advice has always been for people with high blood pressure to reduce their sodium intake. Why would blood pressure decrease when so many low carbers crave salty foods and increase their sodium intake? There is a fairly simple answer to this question. Excess salt consumption can cause excess fluid retention, which can lead to an increase in blood pressure. However, a low carbohydrate diet puts one into ketosis and is naturally diuretic. This helps to reduce the excess fluids in the body, thereby reducing the blood pressure. When your body does not have to pump th Continue reading >>

How Fat Lowers Your Blood Pressure

How Fat Lowers Your Blood Pressure

Hypertension (elevated blood pressure) is one of the triad symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Most of the hypertension that I see clinically is driven by insulin resistance as the underlying cause. I see this problem in a very large majority of the people in my office and I am seeing people younger and younger show up with continually increasing blood pressure. In medical school, we were taught to treat “borderline” or “slightly elevated blood pressure,” through “lifestyle changes” which was another way of saying exercise, caloric restriction & hold the salt. But most physicians today will tell you that exercise, salt & caloric restriction doesn’t work. When asked why the 34 year old male in my office suddenly has elevated blood pressure, the only explanation we had was it is a “genetic problem,” or “blood pressure naturally goes up as we get older,” or “you’ve been eating too much salt,” and they are started on blood pressure medication and sent on their way. But, as time went on, I found that I had to keep adding more and more blood pressure medication to control the continually rising blood pressure of the patients in my practice. Most of these people will have a progressive elevation in blood pressure over time, and these blood pressure (anti-hypertensive) medications are/were continually raised until the person is on four or five different blood pressure pills at maximal doses. Again, when questioned why, their genetics are blamed and that is the end of it. Or is it?! What shocked me was that when I took patients off of salt & caloric restriction, and placed them on low carbohydrate high fat diets (and yes, I gave them back their salt), their blood pressure normalized. I noticed that as their fasting insulin levels began to fall, their bloo Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Lowers Blood Pressure: Fat For Fuel!!

Ketogenic Diet Lowers Blood Pressure: Fat For Fuel!!

Low Carb – High Fat Diets It wasn’t that long ago that low-carb diets were being targeted by medical professionals as unhealthy and detrimental to people’s health. The high fat intake in these diets was thought to be at the root of increased cholesterol and subsequent heart disease. However, in the last 15 years or so, due to a significant number of studies, the medical field has started to change its tune. Now it seems that low carb diets are seen to be amongst the most effective in dealing with a number of health conditions, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight loss and circulatory and other metabolic diseases. The Ketogenic Diet – what exactly is it? According to Dr Joseph Mercola, a highly respected Osteo-pathic physician and Alternative Health Advocate, the Ketogenic Diet is “An eating plan that’s low in sugar and net carbs (carbs without fiber), moderate in protein and high in healthy fats. A ketogenic diet helps you reach nutritional ketosis where your body burns fat for its primary fuel instead of cell-damaging carbs.” The body is designed to use fats more efficiently than carbohydrates with the result that by eating more healthy fats, less protein and carbs you will kick start the body’s metabolism to burn more fat and ketones. Ketones are substances which naturally occur in the body and are created in the liver. These are then the substances which are purposed to be turned into and used as energy. Additionally, this ketogenic process will also stimulate the mitochondria (the fuel producing elements of each cell) to produce optimal amounts of energy. This is certainly very beneficial to the body as a whole, and especially to the high energy-driven organs like the brain, heart and muscles. for more info click here How does this Continue reading >>

Starting Low Carb Or Keto With High Blood Pressure - Diet Doctor

Starting Low Carb Or Keto With High Blood Pressure - Diet Doctor

So you have high blood pressure and you want to try a low-carb or keto diet? Congratulations! It may be the most effective thing for lowering your blood pressure naturally. 1 In some cases it may even normalize your blood pressure completely. 2 However, there are two minor potential problems. If youre on blood-pressure medication and start a low-carb diet theres a risk of getting low blood pressure. You may relatively quickly become too healthy for your current dosage of medication. 3 This blood-pressure lowering effect on low carb can happen within days, but it may also take months or even a year to reach full effect. 4 If you feel symptoms of low blood pressure, such as feeling weak, tired or dizzy, you should immediately check your blood pressure. If its low, e.g. below 120/80, you should contact your doctor to discuss if lowering or stopping your medication is appropriate for you. This is something most doctors should be able to handle. But if you need to find a doctor with good knowledge about the handling of medication on a low-carb diet, check out our low-carb doctors map and directory. When starting a low-carb diet we often recommend getting extra fluid and salt, perhaps in the form of bouillon especially during the first two weeks. The reason is to minimize early side effects that can otherwise be troublesome when starting low carb, e.g. headache . You should only take this bouillon if your blood pressure is well controlled, as it may increase blood pressure marginally. 5 If your blood pressure is high despite medication you should not take extra salt or bouillon. Doing so could raise the blood pressure even higher, and it is not wise to risk that. Any side effects will usually pass within a few days anyway, as your body switches from using glucose to fat as i Continue reading >>

Low Carb Dieting Myths

Low Carb Dieting Myths

The myths about low carb dieting and specifically ketogenic diets abound in the American collective consciousness. These are just a few of the most pervasive myths I've encountered, with explanations as to why they are incorrect and simply don't make sense, scientifically: Myth 1: Carbs are an essential nutrient for good health. Some nutrition professionals still believe that carbohydrates are necessary to provide glucose to fuel the brain and avoid hypoglycemia. It's an old way of thinking, and it's just not true scientifically. Essential nutrients are nutrients which your body cannot make, so they have to be obtained on a daily basis from your food sources. There are essential proteins, and essential fatty acids, but there is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate. When the body is in ketosis, it has a “glucose sparing” effect. First, the skeletal muscles burn fatty acids preferentially which spares glucose for the brain to use. Second, once a person is keto-adapted, the brain switches to using ketone bodies for over half of the fuel it needs, and less glucose is needed since ketone bodies are being used as an alternative fuel. This small amount of carbohydrate (glucose or blood sugar) needed to fuel the brain during keto adaptation can be generated internally. Your liver can make all the glucose needed for brain function from glycogen stored in the liver. And if need be, the body can also make glucose from the protein in your food. Hence, carbohydrates are NOT essential nutrients, and many people, such as the Inuit of Alaska and the Masai of Africa live without them for long periods of time without any effect on health and well-being. The “brain needs carbs” idea is only true if you consistently eat a high carb diet (as most registered dietitians will tel Continue reading >>

Effects Of Ketogenic Diets On Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Evidence From Animal And Human Studies

Effects Of Ketogenic Diets On Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Evidence From Animal And Human Studies

Effects of Ketogenic Diets on Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies Christophe Kosinski 1 and Franois R. Jornayvaz 2,* 1Service of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV), Avenue de la Sallaz 8, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland; [email protected] 1Service of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV), Avenue de la Sallaz 8, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland; [email protected] 2Service of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Hypertension and Nutrition, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland *Correspondence: fran [email protected] ; Tel.: +41-22-372-9302 Received 2017 Mar 7; Accepted 2017 May 16. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( ). This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The treatment of obesity and cardiovascular diseases is one of the most difficult and important challenges nowadays. Weight loss is frequently offered as a therapy and is aimed at improving some of the components of the metabolic syndrome. Among various diets, ketogenic diets, which are very low in carbohydrates and usually high in fats and/or proteins, have gained in popularity. Results regarding the impact of such diets on cardiovascular risk factors are controversial, both in animals and humans, but some improvements notably in obesity and type 2 diabetes have been described. Unfortunately, these effects seem to be limited in time. Moreover, these diets are not totally safe and can be associated with some adverse events. Notably, in rodents, development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and insulin r Continue reading >>

Can A Low Carb Diet Lower Blood Pressure?

Can A Low Carb Diet Lower Blood Pressure?

We previously looked at research suggesting that a well-planned, low-carb diet coupled with exercise can help you lower blood sugar, triglycerides, and body weight and also improve HDL cholesterol and insulin sensitivity. But what impact does ketogenic diet have on blood pressure? Recent research suggests that maintaining an optimal blood pressure is even more critical for your heart and overall health than previously thought. Read below to learn how cutting carbs and keto may be a good tool in maintaining a healthy blood pressure. What is Blood Pressure? Before looking at the research, we need to straighten out the sometimes intimidating terminology behind blood pressure. Blood pressure, often shortened as BP, is the pressure exerted by blood upon the walls of blood vessels. Typically, it refers to the pressure exerted upon arteries which are the vessels that carry blood away from the heart. As you might know, BP is usually expressed as one number over another. The top number, called systolic pressure, refers to the amount of pressure in your arteries when your heart contracts. This is the maximum pressure exerted upon the walls of the blood vessels. The bottom number, called diastolic pressure, indicates the pressure in your arteries between heart beats. This value is lower than the systolic pressure because the heart is exerting less force on the fluids against the artery walls. Both pressures are measured by the units “millimeters of mercury”, which is abbreviated as mm Hg. What is a Healthy Blood Pressure? According to the American Heart Association (AHA), the “standard” human blood pressure is 120/80 mm Hg. Healthy blood pressure is typically below these numbers. People with a systolic blood pressure between 120-139 mm Hg and a diastolic blood pressure bet Continue reading >>

8 Foods That Naturally Lower Blood Pressure

8 Foods That Naturally Lower Blood Pressure

8 Foods That Naturally Lower Blood Pressure Don't Worry, You Won't Have to Eat Sprouts When I think about blood pressure I think about those free blood pressure machines you find at pharmacies. I always sit down and let them squeeze the hell out of my arms until some random numbers flash up on the screen. I used to never know what those numbers meant. I just knew that each had to be below a certain level and if they were then I was the healthiest person on the planet. Of course, that isnt true, but thats how the machine makes me feel. Your blood pressure is typically recorded as two numbers that are written in a ratio like this: 177/76. This is read as 117 over 76. If you really want to get medical it is technically read as 117 over 76 millimeters of mercury. That makes it sound much scarier than it really is. So what are these numbers and what do they represent? Systolic: The top number, which should always be the higher number of the two (if not go see the grim reaper), measures the pressure in the arteries when the heart beats. Diastolic: The bottom number measures the pressure in the arteries between heartbeats. Make sense? When your heart beats it pumps blood through your arteries causing them to expand and therefore the pressure rises. What Is the Recommendation for Healthy Blood Pressure? This blood pressure table reflects categories defined by the American Heart Association so if you have a problem with them, then take it up with them. Dont shoot the messenger! A single higher blood pressure reading doesnt necessarily mean that you have high blood pressure. You couldve just climbed Mt. Everest so its important to do multiple readings over time. If they all show consistent readings of high blood pressure then you will need to work on lowering your blood pressure Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

How To Normalize Your Blood Pressure

How To Normalize Your Blood Pressure

Elevated blood pressure is a common health issue today. Almost a third of U.S. adults have high blood pressure – perhaps you or someone in your family does? High blood pressure isn’t necessarily something you can feel, but it increases the risk of serious conditions such as strokes and heart attacks. The good news is that you can improve your blood pressure by way of simple lifestyle changes. The usual treatment for elevated blood pressure today is medication. This is often reasonable. But what if you could achieve perfect blood pressure without pills or side-effects – with improved health and weight as welcome side-bonuses, instead? The truth is that high blood pressure was extremely rare as recently as a few hundred years ago. Something in today’s environment is giving more and more people high blood pressure. What is it? Contents What is blood pressure? Five ways to lower your blood pressure What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is exactly what it sounds like: the pressure in your blood vessels. With a normal amount of blood, a healthy heart and healthy, elastic blood vessels, you’ll experience a normal blood pressure. Low blood pressure can make you feel dizzy, especially right when you stand up from having been seated. This is usually harmless and can be the result of dehydration or salt deficiency. Mildly or moderately elevated blood pressure will rarely give obvious symptoms (a light headache might occur sometimes). A very high blood pressure can give severe headaches, fatigue and nausea. High blood pressure is the result of an increased amount of liquid and salt in the blood, and also of the blood vessel walls being thicker and harder than normal. As high blood pressure often goes unnoticed, it’s common for people to live with it unawares for some t Continue reading >>

More in ketosis