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Ketosis And Alcohol Consumption

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

When it involves ketogenic dieting and consuming alcohol, there are lots of confusing and different opinions around, and it can drive you to make all sorts of mistakes. One of those difficult areas is how alcohol can fit in with a keto lifestyle. Hopefully, after you read this, you’ll have better knowledge after reading and then able to make sensible decisions on your ketogenic diet journey. Since just because you don’t consume carbs does not mean the end of a social life. You may be asking yourself can I drink alcohol on keto? The quick answer is of course. One way of thinking about it is to think of it as a once in a while treat the same as you would as eating a cheat meal. As long as you have no medical requirements that would otherwise forbid it, then it’s absolutely okay to consume alcohol in moderation while on a low-carb or keto diet. However, you must be conscious of all the carbohydrates you are drinking which is essentially empty calories. Alcohol slows Ketosis Consuming alcohol won’t kick you out of ketosis initially, but it will severely hamper any potential results. If unsure whether you are in ketosis see our post on how to tell if you’re in ketosis. Your body has no way of storing the energy in alcohol, so before your body can use other energy sources, you burn the calories in alcohol first. Alcohol is not stored as glycogen, so you are quickly back into lipolysis after the alcohol is processed. So, while you consume alcohol, everything in your body is on pause, and it’s not processing fats for energy. Weight loss is merely delayed not stopped. Most people when beginning a ketogenic diet will have to track their macronutrients to be sure to maintain ketosis. The main macros to track that provide us energy during the day are protein 4 calories Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ok, first thing is first, before we get into the Ketogenic diet and alcohol’s effect on ketosis; that is most western cultures drink far too much. Now I know most people (those on a keto diet included) don’t want to hear that, and I’m not trying to be a party-pooper, but I’m here to tell you the truth as I know it, not to tell you what you want to hear. Anyway, there’s a little room for debate depending on how you read the evidence on whether there’s room in a Ketogenic Diet for alcohol and whether alcohol will throw you out of ketosis, it may or may not, but there are certainly side effects to be aware of, some very dangerous. Ketogenic Diet and Alcohol Effects on Ketosis I’ve read quite a few articles and forums about keto and alcohol and almost all of them dance around it looking for some loophole in the figures to squeeze in some amount of alcohol. Many try to satisfy the vast majority who think giving away alcohol on a keto diet will be a deal breaker. They all try hard I have to say. Let’s be real, if you’re dying to fit alcohol into your ketogenic diet and it’s a must have for you, I doubt the small amount that could possibly fit in will satisfy you. Here are a few things to consider if you’re to drink alcohol while trying to maintain a keto diet: You will undoubtedly get drunk much quicker on a ketogenic diet than if you weren’t. Hangovers will be worse, as you know a keto diet flushes your body of water retention and the chances that you’ll be staying hydrated while drinking is slim, alcohol is notorious for dehydrating you. Even if alcohol itself doesn’t kick you out of ketosis, when tipsy self-control goes out the window, you’re likely to eat whatever is in front of you. If you are determined to include alcohol in your ketogenic Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

The Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide

Alcohol on a Low Carb Diet! Alcohol gets a bad rep, and is certainly one of the most abused substances in the world. It can become a serious problem when it interferes with your personal/social life and well-being. To enjoy it we need to exercise moderation and self-control. If you like having a couple of beers, shots or glasses of wine to relax or have a good time on weekends, you’re in good shape! But throw a low carb diet into the mix, and you may find yourself struggling with the quantity of alcohol you’re drinking. People on a keto or low carb diet notice their tolerances significantly drop. And when you realize your favorite drink contains more than 30 grams of carbs in a small serving, you may consider giving alcohol up. Before you give it up, use our Ultimate Keto Alcohol Guide to help navigate your way through your local bar and become a keto connoisseur. How and Why Alcohol Affects Us “…alcohol molecules slow down signals from the brain for actions such as walking and talking” Alcohol is actually the fourth macronutrient, providing our body with 7 calories per gram. If you aren’t familiar with macronutrients, you can read more about macronutrients here. Since alcohol is not needed for survival and is considered toxic to humans, it’s ignored under this umbrella of essential macronutrients. When we ingest alcohol (in the form of ethanol), our body begins to work to metabolize it, or destroy/break it down to get energy. Since alcohol is toxic to our bodies, we begin to metabolize it as soon as possible. The tipsy feeling we get is the alcohol being metabolized. Since alcohol molecules are water and fat soluble, they’re able to pass through and be delivered to pretty much all parts of our body, most importantly, our brain and liver. About 98% of th Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

Another very common question asked by those new to a Zero Carb diet is: Can I Drink Alcohol on a Zero Carb Diet? There have been many posts about this subject in the Facebook group Zeroing in on Health. I have selected some of the best comments from these discussions and posted them here for easy reference. While occasional or even moderate consumption of dry, non-sweet alcohol might be okay for some people. Those who are new to a Zero Carb diet are strongly encouraged to abstain from it during their initial 30-Day trial. Once you have a clear baseline of how you feel on just meat and water, then you can easily test out other things like dairy or alcohol and get a much better idea of how your body is personally affected by them. … Dr. Paul Mabry: I’m a retired MD with years of low carb ketogenic blogging experience. I’m day 6 on this new and from all my research intuitively beautiful way of eating. There have been some questions about alcohol so I wanted to post this short answer on the basic science of alcohol in layman’s terms which apply equally to low carb and zero carb: Moderate alcohol can be accommodated on the diet. Alcohol is metabolized exclusively in the liver and does not stimulate the release of Insulin which is the big enemy of people like me who suffer from the metabolic syndrome. Things to know if you’re going to drink alcohol is that many forms contain carbs that can torpedo any weight loss. The worst offenders are beers, even lite ones, sweet wines though all wines contain carbs the dry ones contain the least and some drinks like hard cider and lemonade are as bad as drinking Coke. You will have to count carbs if you consume these. Drinks like Rum, Scotch, Whiskey and Vodka have zero carbs if you drink them with water. However, Scotch and Whi Continue reading >>

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Hey all. I was bumping around the paleo inter-webs and came across this little nugget on ketosis: DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL IF YOU ARE KETOTIC! Alcohol is a powerful inhibitor of gluconeogenesis. In fact, it forces part of the gluconeogenic metabolic process into reverse. This means that if all the glucose in the blood is being derived from gluconeogenesis then the consumption of alcohol will inevitably cause the blood glucose level to fall. Worse still, the alcohol also stops ketone body production, thus leaving the brain entirely without fuel. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 A person who is ketotic is 100% reliant on gluconeogenesis to maintain adequate levels of glucose in the blood. If, under these circumstances alcohol is taken, the person will become disorientated and might lose consciousness, not just from the alcohol, but from low blood sugar. Needless to say, this could be very dangerous, and even fatal. Alcohol does not have these effects if the glycogen stores in the liver are normal. Under these circumstances the blood glucose level in the blood is maintained by the breakdown of liver glycogen, a process that is not influenced by alcohol. If a person becomes confused under these circumstances it is due simply to the pharmacological effects of the alcohol! - Link Although I'm philosophically ketosis-agnostic, I do best on a lowish carb diet and most likely find myself in ketosis from time-to-time. I'm wondering what you think of this warning. Is the science sound? Should ketotic boozers eat a sweet potato before hitting the firewater this xmas? Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

There’s something called a ketogenic diet that a lot more people are relying on as a way to lose weight, particularly recently. So what is the ketogenic diet, what is ketosis, and what is the relationship between alcohol and the ketosis diet and weight loss? Below are some of the things to know about the ketogenic diet and alcohol and ketosis. Before looking at the specifics of alcohol and ketosis, what is ketosis in general? Ketosis is a term that refers to a metabolic process that your body regularly goes through. When you don’t have the glucose you need to fuel your body with energy, you’ll instead go into a mode where you’re burning stored fats. When this happens, ketones, which are a build-up of acids, are in the body. The belief with the ketogenic diet is that you can encourage your body to go into that state of ketosis or fat-burning by following a certain diet, which is low-carb. You’re basically forcing your body to eliminate fat because that’s what it’s using for energy instead of carbs. The state of ketosis frequently occurs in people with diabetes, and while it’s a normal process, some extremes are possible. If you have extreme ketosis, you’re more likely to have type 1 diabetes, as an example. If your ketone levels rise too much, it can cause your acid level in your blood to similarly rise, which can cause a condition called ketoacidosis. This can be deadly. Your body typically primarily uses glucose as energy, such as from sugary or starchy foods, but if there’s not enough of this glucose your body will then go to breaking down your stores of fat. The ketogenic diet is also called a low-carb diet, or a keto diet. It’s based on a concept of eating primarily fats, and a reduced amount of carbohydrates. While it’s relatively popular, t Continue reading >>

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Meredith Dykstra: Welcome to Cellular Healing TV. I’m your host Meredith Dykstra and this is Episode Number 146, and we have Dr. Dan Pompa, our resident cellular healing specialist on the line. Today we have a very special guest, and his name is Todd White. Todd White is a wine expert and we have a lot of fun things to talk about. This is not your average wine that he makes. We’re going to talk a lot about wine today, but before we delve in, let me tell you guys a little bit more about Todd. Todd White has been a serial entrepreneur and creator since he was age 17. Today, after 15 years in the wine business, his life is dedicated to educating and helping people make better choices about food nutrition and how they think about consuming alcohol. He is the founder of Drive Farm Wine, a writer, speaker, and a leading authority on healthy organic natural wines, and the importance of micro-dosing alcohol for health, longevity, and vitality. Todd’s passion is unlocking the best way to enjoy alcohol, how to enjoy the benefits of modern consumption while avoiding the negative outcomes. Todd has been a featured guest on many of the nation’s leading health influential podcasts, including David Asbury, Bullet Proof Radio; Mark Sisson, Primal Blue Print; Abel James, Fat Burning Man; Rob Wolf’s, Paleo Solution; and Jimmy Moore, Living Low-carb Show. Todd is a self-described biohacker who practices daily meditation, Wim Hof breathing, cold thermogenesis, a ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, and he is a fitness enthusiast. He’s also a frequent speaker on ketogenic lifestyle, and is completing a cookbook on the ketogenic diet and lifestyle to be released this fall called, Keto Well. He was most recently the featured ketogenic speaker at the 2016 Bulletproof annual confer Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Alcohol

Ketosis And Alcohol

When it comes to the ketogenic lifestyle, there are lots of confusing and conflicting opinions floating around, and they can lead to all kinds of mistakes. One of those confusing areas is how alcohol fits into a ketogenic lifestyle. Hopefully, after you read this, you’ll have a pretty good understanding and some tools to use to make informed decisions along the way. First off, not all alcoholic beverages are the same. Alcohol is the same across the board; it’s a macronutrient with seven calories per gram, so that’s the starting point. It’s a byproduct of fermentation. Essentially, a sugar compound is acted upon by yeast and the yeast produces alcohol and carbon dioxide. Depending on the type of sugar compound, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages. Hard liquor, or spirits, takes the process a little further and adds distillation. That is, essentially, the process of “boiling off” the alcohol and then re-condensing (as it cools) it into more a more concentrated form. When you something marketed as “Distilled 9 times”, that just means they went through the boiling and condensing process nine times. Okay, so that’s where alcohol comes from, but that’s not all there is to it. Like said, the type of sugar compound determines the type of alcohol. For example, beer is made with, basically four ingredients. Barley, hops, water, and yeast. Barley is the primary ingredient, it’s where the sugar (maltose) comes from for the yeast. It’s also very similar to wheat. It’s a very bad carb. And it’s the reason that some people call beer “liquid bread”. It is far too rich in carbohydrates, not just the sugars, but the other “glutenous carbs”. So it’s a definite no for Ketovangelists. Beer does not fit into a ketogenic lifestyle. (Sidenote: A Continue reading >>

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drink Alcohol On Keto

Drinking alcohol has become a big part of modern culture, as has eating carbs. But those things deserve more attention when on keto. How do you drink alcohol on the ketogenic diet? Keto and Alcohol Let’s look into the properties of alcohol. Alcohol is commonly thought of as the 4th macronutrient because it does have calories in it but gives no real energy to the body. The body has no mechanism to store alcohol endogenously because it’s still toxic. Whenever you consume alcohol, the liver will prioritize getting rid of it over everything else. Meaning, while metabolizing alcohol, the body isn’t metabolizing anything else. You’re not burning fat or producing ketones either. Do you get kicked out of ketosis when drinking alcohol? Not entirely, but it can still have some effects on your metabolism, weight loss and overall health. Alcohol While Keto But not all alcohol is created nor metabolized equally. Alcoholic beverages consist of many ingredients. Ethanol, which is the alcohol molecule, is one of them. Additionally, nearly all drinks contain some sort of a sugar compound, which determines the carb content and metabolic effects. Alcohol to avoid on keto Beer is made of barley, hops, yeast, and water. Rich in carbs. Ciders and long drinks are like alcoholic sodas. Wine has grape juice, some sweeter than others. More carbs. Cocktails and sugary mixers have soda, syrups, and juices. Flavored spirits have added sugar and more carbs. In general, the sweeter something tastes, the more carbs it has. You won’t get kicked out of ketosis by drinking a glass of wine or even two. But you will definitely do so with beer, cider, and cocktails. Those margaritas aren’t good for ketones or your waistline. Don’t eat food while drinking alcohol. Because it’s still a toxin, Continue reading >>

Mistakes That Keto-warriors Commonly Make (fats, Alcohol, And Nutrient Deficiency)

Mistakes That Keto-warriors Commonly Make (fats, Alcohol, And Nutrient Deficiency)

Intro Update May 2017: My current thoughts are not in line with this post. Read more here. It’s been little over a year since I embarked on my keto lifestyle. The nutritional approach is only a small (but important) part of my life optimization strategy. I’ve been through a lot of trial and error while trying to improve my macro partitioning. If it weren’t for the research and the books that I read throughout, I’d still be stuck in the mud. While being active on many FB groups and spamming whenever I post something new on my blog here :), I’ve seen that many people want to rush into getting results, want quick fixes, shortcuts, which gets them into nothing but trouble. So, let me try and give you my perspective on a few of the common mistakes that I see. Too much fat, too much food, poor nutrition I believe (please do not assume I generalize) eating high-fat does not mean consuming 3,000 – 10,000 kcals per day out of which 85% or more should come from fat. Doing so will lead to a possible nutrient deficient state. I tried eating 3,000+ kcals the first few days to weeks after starting the keto journey in Oct. 2013. I couldn’t do it for the long-term, especially because I was forcing myself to over-consume food. It did not feel normal or natural. I think that eating keto-friendly foods should not rely upon consuming entire sticks of butter or pouring all sorts of oils and butter into your coffee. That’s very energy rich, nutrient poor. Your body can thrive on a very-high-fat-very-low-carb diet with literally consumption of < 10g of carbohydrates per day. While releasing fats from the adipose tissue and hydrolyzing TAGs, your body can create most of its essential supply of vitamins and minerals (that’s what happens in long-term starvation too). But, for G Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

What is alcoholic ketoacidosis? Cells need glucose (sugar) and insulin to function properly. Glucose comes from the food you eat, and insulin is produced by the pancreas. When you drink alcohol, your pancreas may stop producing insulin for a short time. Without insulin, your cells won’t be able to use the glucose you consume for energy. To get the energy you need, your body will start to burn fat. When your body burns fat for energy, byproducts known as ketone bodies are produced. If your body is not producing insulin, ketone bodies will begin to build up in your bloodstream. This buildup of ketones can produce a life-threatening condition known as ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis, or metabolic acidosis, occurs when you ingest something that is metabolized or turned into an acid. This condition has a number of causes, including: shock kidney disease abnormal metabolism In addition to general ketoacidosis, there are several specific types. These types include: alcoholic ketoacidosis, which is caused by excessive consumption of alcohol diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which mostly develops in people with type 1 diabetes starvation ketoacidosis, which occurs most often in women who are pregnant, in their third trimester, and experiencing excessive vomiting Each of these situations increases the amount of acid in the system. They can also reduce the amount of insulin your body produces, leading to the breakdown of fat cells and the production of ketones. Alcoholic ketoacidosis can develop when you drink excessive amounts of alcohol for a long period of time. Excessive alcohol consumption often causes malnourishment (not enough nutrients for the body to function well). People who drink large quantities of alcohol may not eat regularly. They may also vomit as a result of drinking too Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Everything You Need To Know About Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol

Let me be real with you for a second… I was born in the USSR and spent the majority of my life there. Alcohol is running through my veins from generations to generations of Eastern European drinking culture. It is only logical to create the ultimate keto diet alcohol cheat sheet. Alcohol is not only a topic that I want to discuss but I also want to share some Russian hacks that I use to stay ketogenic and tipsy at the same time. Keto diet macros Most people on ketogenic diet track their macros. Macros are macronutrients in short. There are 3 main macronutrients that provide us with energy throughout the day: protein, fat, and carbs. Where does ketosis and alcohol fit in? Interestingly enough, alcohol is the fourth macronutrient. It provides us with plenty of fun and energy on weekends. Alcohol runs at 7 calories per gram. That is a lot of energy! In comparison, fat runs at 9 calories per gram, protein and carbs at 4 calories per gram. It should give you an idea that drinking a lot can easily put you overboard with your daily keto caloric intake. I want to admit that I have done this multiple times. No worries, alcohol during keto can be done. So, for example, you go out with your friends and it feels like a fun night so you take 2 tequila shots. What happens to that liquor in your body? BTW, high five on that keto sodium intake with tequila. It definitely helped you out. Our body processes alcohol as a toxic substance. About 98% of it gets metabolized by our liver and another %2 is excreted through our keto urine, keto sweat, and even keto breath. Russian Alcohol Hack #1: Before you start drinking, take 2-3 activated charcoal pills. No hangover since 1995. Proven to work for me. Keto alcohol tolerance Let’s go back to the two tequila shots that you just took. If you Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis

Alcohol And Ketosis

ALCOHOL AND KETOSIS I once had a client who told me he HAD to have a few glasses of wine in the evening so he would blow ketones in the morning and if he didn’t drink, ketones were not present. UM, WHAT? Yep, he was right. A breath ketone tester is a lot like the breathalyzer that police use. Which made me think if someone in ketosis gets pulled over and asked to blow in a breathalyzer would they be in trouble just for being in ketosis?… So what about ‘Alcohol and Ketosis’? But the truth is alcohol does not help you get into ketosis if anything alcohol is holding you back from your best self. Not only physically but mentally. ALCOHOL FACTS When people go on a diet, they often choose the “light” version of their favorite alcoholic beverages in order to save a few calories. However, that is only a small piece of the puzzle. Fat metabolism is reduced by as much as 73% after only two alcoholic beverages. This scary fact shows that the primary effect of alcohol on the body is not so much how many calories we consume, but how it stops the body’s ability to use your fat stores for energy. Muscle Tip: Drinking alcohol is the most efficient way to slash your testosterone levels; women…we don’t want this to happen either. Just a single event of serious drinking raises levels of the muscle-wasting stress hormone called cortisol and decreases the levels of testosterone for up to 24 hours. If you are working out to build strong fat-burning muscles yet consuming alcohol, this actually breaks down muscle further and you end up with a slower metabolism. This is because you break down muscle as you lift weights and you repair them as you rest if you have proper hormone levels…if not, you never repair your muscles properly! Alcohol in the body is converted into a subs Continue reading >>

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

Ketosis And Alcohol: Can You Drink On Keto?

As the festive party season fast approaches, a common question raised by my clients is ‘Am I able to have an alcoholic drink whilst on the ketogenic diet?’ So I thought I’d put together all of my thoughts around ketosis and alcohol and share it with the rest of my followers. For starters, let take a look at what happens to our body when we consume alcohol. When we drink alcohol, it gets absorbed very quickly into our bloodstream via our stomach and small intestine. Alcohol is toxic and as a result, the body tries to get rid of it as quickly as possible by breaking it down into non toxic substances, carbon dioxide and water. This detoxification process takes place in the liver. The liver is unable to process all of the alcohol in the bloodstream at once, so the body has other ways of getting rid of it, via urine, sweat and even the lungs. Ketosis and alcohol: the effect on weight loss Alcohol is best avoided on a keto diet because it impacts insulin levels and the whole point of eating a ketogenic diet is to control insulin by lowering blood sugar levels enough to allow use fat for fuel (preferably your own body fat if you’re trying to lean down). Insulin is the hormone that prevents this from happening and essentially locks body fat in, preventing it from being an accessible fuel source. When alcohol is consumed, there’s typically an initial rise in blood sugars. The amount to which is rises depends on how much you’ve drank. This is because the body is trying to rid itself of the toxic alcohol, rather than controlling its blood sugar levels. As the body detoxifies, insulin then spikes to allow blood sugar levels to be controlled. Ketone levels also drop. This locks the body fat in and halts the fat burning process! This is exactly the opposite of what we wan Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Boy, doesn’t that bottle of wine above look like it’s ominously laying in a casket? Alcohol is infamously known as the fourth macronutrient. If you enjoy a drink or two but aren’t sure if that fits into the keto diet alcohol guidelines, let’s shed some light on the keto diet alcohol rules so you can make an informed decision about what’s best for your goals. Let’s not sugar coat this: When you drink alcohol, your body is getting the signal that there is a toxic substance present. It will then send all it’s resources to the liver to process the toxin as quickly as possible, taking resources from other processes, one of which, is fat oxidation (re: ketone production). This means drinking alcohol slows ketone production. It’s true that partying looks a little different when you’re keto. Some people consider it (or rationalize it) that it’s their cheat meal. There are some legitimate concerns when it comes to consuming alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Here are some of the biggest things to keep in mind before reaching for your next drink. Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What to Avoid and Why Let’s first acknowledge that not all alcoholic drinks are created equal. Of course, alcohol (ethanol) the molecule itself, is always the same. Yeast acts on a sugar compound to make both carbon dioxide and the alcohol. But the type of sugar compound used and the type of drink mixture is what determines how your body uses the alcohol. For example, let’s look at beer. It’s made from barley, hops, yeast, and water. Barley is the main ingredient broken down to the sugar maltose, which is what the yeast acts on. Beer is a dangerous drink for those going keto because the process leaves it rich in carbohydrates, which can stop or slow ketosis. In the same vein, some other drinks Continue reading >>

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