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Ketosis And Alcohol Consumption

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What To Drink, What To Avoid

Boy, doesn’t that bottle of wine above look like it’s ominously laying in a casket? Alcohol is infamously known as the fourth macronutrient. If you enjoy a drink or two but aren’t sure if that fits into the keto diet alcohol guidelines, let’s shed some light on the keto diet alcohol rules so you can make an informed decision about what’s best for your goals. Let’s not sugar coat this: When you drink alcohol, your body is getting the signal that there is a toxic substance present. It will then send all it’s resources to the liver to process the toxin as quickly as possible, taking resources from other processes, one of which, is fat oxidation (re: ketone production). This means drinking alcohol slows ketone production. It’s true that partying looks a little different when you’re keto. Some people consider it (or rationalize it) that it’s their cheat meal. There are some legitimate concerns when it comes to consuming alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Here are some of the biggest things to keep in mind before reaching for your next drink. Keto Diet Alcohol Rules: What to Avoid and Why Let’s first acknowledge that not all alcoholic drinks are created equal. Of course, alcohol (ethanol) the molecule itself, is always the same. Yeast acts on a sugar compound to make both carbon dioxide and the alcohol. But the type of sugar compound used and the type of drink mixture is what determines how your body uses the alcohol. For example, let’s look at beer. It’s made from barley, hops, yeast, and water. Barley is the main ingredient broken down to the sugar maltose, which is what the yeast acts on. Beer is a dangerous drink for those going keto because the process leaves it rich in carbohydrates, which can stop or slow ketosis. In the same vein, some other drinks Continue reading >>

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Drinking Booze While In Ketosis: Is It Dangerous?

Hey all. I was bumping around the paleo inter-webs and came across this little nugget on ketosis: DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL IF YOU ARE KETOTIC! Alcohol is a powerful inhibitor of gluconeogenesis. In fact, it forces part of the gluconeogenic metabolic process into reverse. This means that if all the glucose in the blood is being derived from gluconeogenesis then the consumption of alcohol will inevitably cause the blood glucose level to fall. Worse still, the alcohol also stops ketone body production, thus leaving the brain entirely without fuel. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 A person who is ketotic is 100% reliant on gluconeogenesis to maintain adequate levels of glucose in the blood. If, under these circumstances alcohol is taken, the person will become disorientated and might lose consciousness, not just from the alcohol, but from low blood sugar. Needless to say, this could be very dangerous, and even fatal. Alcohol does not have these effects if the glycogen stores in the liver are normal. Under these circumstances the blood glucose level in the blood is maintained by the breakdown of liver glycogen, a process that is not influenced by alcohol. If a person becomes confused under these circumstances it is due simply to the pharmacological effects of the alcohol! - Link Although I'm philosophically ketosis-agnostic, I do best on a lowish carb diet and most likely find myself in ketosis from time-to-time. I'm wondering what you think of this warning. Is the science sound? Should ketotic boozers eat a sweet potato before hitting the firewater this xmas? Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet (kd) In Alcoholism

Ketogenic Diet (kd) In Alcoholism

Background: A ketogenic diet (KD) is high in fat and low in carbohydrates. Research has shown that a KD can lessen tremor in animals withdrawing from alcohol. KD can also help people who have difficulties with thinking, sleep, and mood. Researchers want to see if KD can lessen symptoms of alcohol withdrawal in people with alcohol use disorder. Objective: To test the effects of a ketogenic diet on alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Eligibility: Adults 18 years or older who are moderate or severe alcohol drinkers and are seeking treatment for alcohol use. They must be in the NIAAA inpatient alcohol treatment program. Design: Participants will be screened under another protocol. They will have a medical and psychiatric history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. Participants will have a breath test for alcohol. The study will be done in a 3-week stay in the clinic. Participants will get either a KD or Standard American diet. Participants will have breathalyzer, blood, and urine tests. Participants will have magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The scanner is a cylinder in a magnetic field. They will lie on a table that slides in and out of the cylinder. They will do tasks on a computer during the scan. Participants will have tests of thinking, memory, and attention. Participants will have their sleeping and waking measured. They will wear a device like a headband held in place with elastic straps. Several electrodes will be placed on the body. Participants will have heart tests. Participants will wear an activity monitor on the wrist. After the clinic stay, participants will be called by phone about 5 times over 3 months. Alcohol intoxication leads to marked reductions in brain glucose metabolism that reflect in part the use of ketones (including acetate) as alter Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

Alcohol On A Low Carb, Keto Diet!

For years, I’ve read countless dieting books that prohibited me from drinking alcohol. Actually, it’s probably the first thing that many “diet gurus” say to cut out of your diet and for (somewhat) good reason. Alcohol gets a bad reputation because it’s basically empty calories. In an ideal world, sure. I’ll give up alcohol to lose weight. But let’s get serious. I’m 23 years old and I very much enjoy a tasty alcoholic beverage (or 5) and a wild night out on the town with my friends. The beauty of a ketogenic, low carb diet is that you can still enjoy yourself from time-to-time with alcohol and still lose weight! However, there are some guidelines as to what alcohols you can enjoy and those you should avoid. Liquor On average, one shot is the equivalent to about 1.5oz and for these spirits have a nutritional value of 0 carbs and roughly 64 calories. Of course, this will vary depending on how much is actually in your beverage (order a double? Double the nutritional stats). Approved spirits on a keto, low carb diet include: Vodka (Three Olives, Absolut, Grey Goose, etc.) Rum (Captain Morgan, etc) Gin (Tanqueray, Beefeater, etc) Tequila Whiskey (Jack Daniel’s, etc.) Scotch Brandy Cognac (Hennessy, etc.) Please note that these are for the original, unflavored versions. For flavored spirits (including flavored vodkas and some dark/coconut rums), always check up on nutritional information before consuming as they often contain carbohydrates. My spirit of choice is generally a nice gin (with soda water& lime) or cognac (with diet cola). I’ve been known to drink a fair share of Hennessy. Chasers & Mixers For mixing or chasing, you have many no sugar, no calorie options Diet sodas (Coke Zero, Diet Coke, Diet Ginger Ale) Soda water Diet tonic water Seltzer water Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis

Alcohol And Ketosis

ALCOHOL AND KETOSIS I once had a client who told me he HAD to have a few glasses of wine in the evening so he would blow ketones in the morning and if he didn’t drink, ketones were not present. UM, WHAT? Yep, he was right. A breath ketone tester is a lot like the breathalyzer that police use. Which made me think if someone in ketosis gets pulled over and asked to blow in a breathalyzer would they be in trouble just for being in ketosis?… So what about ‘Alcohol and Ketosis’? But the truth is alcohol does not help you get into ketosis if anything alcohol is holding you back from your best self. Not only physically but mentally. ALCOHOL FACTS When people go on a diet, they often choose the “light” version of their favorite alcoholic beverages in order to save a few calories. However, that is only a small piece of the puzzle. Fat metabolism is reduced by as much as 73% after only two alcoholic beverages. This scary fact shows that the primary effect of alcohol on the body is not so much how many calories we consume, but how it stops the body’s ability to use your fat stores for energy. Muscle Tip: Drinking alcohol is the most efficient way to slash your testosterone levels; women…we don’t want this to happen either. Just a single event of serious drinking raises levels of the muscle-wasting stress hormone called cortisol and decreases the levels of testosterone for up to 24 hours. If you are working out to build strong fat-burning muscles yet consuming alcohol, this actually breaks down muscle further and you end up with a slower metabolism. This is because you break down muscle as you lift weights and you repair them as you rest if you have proper hormone levels…if not, you never repair your muscles properly! Alcohol in the body is converted into a subs Continue reading >>

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Quick Tips For Low Carb Drinks

Many people believe that adherence to a ketogenic diet means avoiding alcohol altogether. Ketogenic.com does not condone the consumption of alcohol and while it may be true that strict ketogenic dieting may entail refraining from alcohol, the everyday ketogenic connoisseur not following the diet for therapeutic reasons may choose to occasionally enjoy low carb drinks. It is interesting to point out that alcohol itself can actually be ketogenic! In short, ethanol (alcohol) is broken down in the liver to acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), free acetate, or broken down through various condensation reactions. As we know, acetyl-CoA can either be utilized in the Krebs Cycle, used for ketogenesis, or to produce ketone bodies, acetoacetate (AcAc), or in peripheral blood increases about 20 times the normal level when ethanol is present; n (1)! Along with the rise of acetate, we also see a considerable increase in AcAc and BHB (2). While it is true that alcohol consumption could result in ketogenesis, Ketogenic.com certainly does not condone this method of inducing ketosis for obvious reasons. I know what you’re thinking… you didn’t click on this article to read about the biochemistry of alcohol metabolism – and if you did – check back soon for a much more detailed article on this topic and the science behind alcohol! Odds are you came here to learn how to have low carb drinks while remaining in ketosis. The main thing to remember when drinking is alcohol does contain calories – approximately 7 calories per gram. More importantly to the ketogenic dieter, most alcohols contain a significant amount of carbohydrates, which can not only blunt fat metabolism but also prevent ketogenesis from occurring (3,4,5). It goes without saying that it is critical to always drink respons Continue reading >>

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

7 Things You Need To Know About Alcohol And The Keto Diet

Clay Rattenbury started the keto diet in 2014 because he wanted to lose weight. And it worked. He took 70 lbs (32 kg) off his 6’1′ (185 cm) frame in six months. During that time he drank alcohol every day — straight vodka, or vodka mixed with diet coke, often until he blacked out. Still, the weight came off. He actually liked the fact that the ketogenic diet lowered his alcohol tolerance: he’d get drunk faster. About six months into his keto journey, however, Rattenbury knew alcohol was causing too much havoc in his life, harming his health and hurting people he loved. He had to stop drinking. “I realized the way I ate and the way I consumed alcohol were very similar. Once I started I couldn’t stop. It was hard for me to do anything in moderation,” says Rattenbury, 28, who is in the US Navy. He has been sober now for 2.5 years and on the keto diet for three years (except for 8 weeks in Navy boot camp). He feels wonderful, both because of his diet and his sobriety. He is a lean, muscular 185 lbs (84 kg) and feels fit, strong and clear-headed. He enjoys working out regularly. The cravings for both his trigger foods and for alcohol are gone. He sees the two as being very closely related. And he will not risk, ever, bringing up those cravings again. “A few potato chips from time-to-time might not kick me out of ketosis, but it could very well awaken the cravings in me… so that saves me from taking the first bite. And I stay away from alcohol entirely. It is not worth taking a single sip, knowing where my mind goes when I drink.” Alcohol consumption and the keto diet is a hot topic. Many people who want to shed pounds come to ketogenic eating and are delighted that, unlike almost all diets, alcohol is not strictly forbidden when going low carb/high fat. W Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does Alcohol Stop Ketosis?

Does alcohol stop ketosis? What happens if you eat more fat than your body needs? And will a slightly higher carb intake kick you out of ketosis? Get the answers in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Alcohol stopping ketosis? We are trying to get into ketosis and measuring blood ketones which seem to be sitting around 1.0 mmol/L. We have adjusted and readjusted our protein and carb amounts to be within the limits you suggest. Last night I had three vodkas – being no-carb alcohol, can this still affect ketosis levels or would we be doing something else wrong? Thank you, Meg Alcohol should not have any major effect on ketosis, as long as it’s no-carb alcohol like vodka (without sweet ingredients in a drink of course). If anything, pure alcohol tends to somewhat increase ketosis. For best results choose low-carb alcoholic drinks like wine or other low-carb drinks, see the guide below. Also note that many people get more sensitive to alcohol on a ketogenic diet. Be careful and never drink and drive, this is especially true on keto. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt If I eat more fat than my body needs for fuel, what happens to the excess? I understand that if one eats more carbs (glucose) and/or protein than one’s body can immediately use, the excess can be stored as fat. What happens to dietary fat if one eats more of it than can be used? Is it, too, stored, or does the body excrete it? Kathleen It’s mostly stored, though there may be a slight increase in calories burned on low carb. Don’t eat when you’re not hungry, and this should not really be an issue on a low-carb diet, as fat is very satiating. Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Will going moderate low carb >50 carbs turn brain back to using carbs for fuel instead of ketones? I think I need to up carbs for energy. I e Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

Alcohol And Ketosis | Alcohol And Ketosis Diet And Weight Loss

There’s something called a ketogenic diet that a lot more people are relying on as a way to lose weight, particularly recently. So what is the ketogenic diet, what is ketosis, and what is the relationship between alcohol and the ketosis diet and weight loss? Below are some of the things to know about the ketogenic diet and alcohol and ketosis. Before looking at the specifics of alcohol and ketosis, what is ketosis in general? Ketosis is a term that refers to a metabolic process that your body regularly goes through. When you don’t have the glucose you need to fuel your body with energy, you’ll instead go into a mode where you’re burning stored fats. When this happens, ketones, which are a build-up of acids, are in the body. The belief with the ketogenic diet is that you can encourage your body to go into that state of ketosis or fat-burning by following a certain diet, which is low-carb. You’re basically forcing your body to eliminate fat because that’s what it’s using for energy instead of carbs. The state of ketosis frequently occurs in people with diabetes, and while it’s a normal process, some extremes are possible. If you have extreme ketosis, you’re more likely to have type 1 diabetes, as an example. If your ketone levels rise too much, it can cause your acid level in your blood to similarly rise, which can cause a condition called ketoacidosis. This can be deadly. Your body typically primarily uses glucose as energy, such as from sugary or starchy foods, but if there’s not enough of this glucose your body will then go to breaking down your stores of fat. The ketogenic diet is also called a low-carb diet, or a keto diet. It’s based on a concept of eating primarily fats, and a reduced amount of carbohydrates. While it’s relatively popular, t Continue reading >>

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Transcript Of Episode 146: Can You Drink Wine And Stay In Ketosis?

Meredith Dykstra: Welcome to Cellular Healing TV. I’m your host Meredith Dykstra and this is Episode Number 146, and we have Dr. Dan Pompa, our resident cellular healing specialist on the line. Today we have a very special guest, and his name is Todd White. Todd White is a wine expert and we have a lot of fun things to talk about. This is not your average wine that he makes. We’re going to talk a lot about wine today, but before we delve in, let me tell you guys a little bit more about Todd. Todd White has been a serial entrepreneur and creator since he was age 17. Today, after 15 years in the wine business, his life is dedicated to educating and helping people make better choices about food nutrition and how they think about consuming alcohol. He is the founder of Drive Farm Wine, a writer, speaker, and a leading authority on healthy organic natural wines, and the importance of micro-dosing alcohol for health, longevity, and vitality. Todd’s passion is unlocking the best way to enjoy alcohol, how to enjoy the benefits of modern consumption while avoiding the negative outcomes. Todd has been a featured guest on many of the nation’s leading health influential podcasts, including David Asbury, Bullet Proof Radio; Mark Sisson, Primal Blue Print; Abel James, Fat Burning Man; Rob Wolf’s, Paleo Solution; and Jimmy Moore, Living Low-carb Show. Todd is a self-described biohacker who practices daily meditation, Wim Hof breathing, cold thermogenesis, a ketogenic diet, intermittent fasting, and he is a fitness enthusiast. He’s also a frequent speaker on ketogenic lifestyle, and is completing a cookbook on the ketogenic diet and lifestyle to be released this fall called, Keto Well. He was most recently the featured ketogenic speaker at the 2016 Bulletproof annual confer Continue reading >>

Alcohol

Alcohol

Another very common question asked by those new to a Zero Carb diet is: Can I Drink Alcohol on a Zero Carb Diet? There have been many posts about this subject in the Facebook group Zeroing in on Health. I have selected some of the best comments from these discussions and posted them here for easy reference. While occasional or even moderate consumption of dry, non-sweet alcohol might be okay for some people. Those who are new to a Zero Carb diet are strongly encouraged to abstain from it during their initial 30-Day trial. Once you have a clear baseline of how you feel on just meat and water, then you can easily test out other things like dairy or alcohol and get a much better idea of how your body is personally affected by them. … Dr. Paul Mabry: I’m a retired MD with years of low carb ketogenic blogging experience. I’m day 6 on this new and from all my research intuitively beautiful way of eating. There have been some questions about alcohol so I wanted to post this short answer on the basic science of alcohol in layman’s terms which apply equally to low carb and zero carb: Moderate alcohol can be accommodated on the diet. Alcohol is metabolized exclusively in the liver and does not stimulate the release of Insulin which is the big enemy of people like me who suffer from the metabolic syndrome. Things to know if you’re going to drink alcohol is that many forms contain carbs that can torpedo any weight loss. The worst offenders are beers, even lite ones, sweet wines though all wines contain carbs the dry ones contain the least and some drinks like hard cider and lemonade are as bad as drinking Coke. You will have to count carbs if you consume these. Drinks like Rum, Scotch, Whiskey and Vodka have zero carbs if you drink them with water. However, Scotch and Whi Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ketogenic Diet And Alcohol Effects On Ketosis Is It Keto Friendly?

Ok, first thing is first, before we get into the Ketogenic diet and alcohol’s effect on ketosis; that is most western cultures drink far too much. Now I know most people (those on a keto diet included) don’t want to hear that, and I’m not trying to be a party-pooper, but I’m here to tell you the truth as I know it, not to tell you what you want to hear. Anyway, there’s a little room for debate depending on how you read the evidence on whether there’s room in a Ketogenic Diet for alcohol and whether alcohol will throw you out of ketosis, it may or may not, but there are certainly side effects to be aware of, some very dangerous. Ketogenic Diet and Alcohol Effects on Ketosis I’ve read quite a few articles and forums about keto and alcohol and almost all of them dance around it looking for some loophole in the figures to squeeze in some amount of alcohol. Many try to satisfy the vast majority who think giving away alcohol on a keto diet will be a deal breaker. They all try hard I have to say. Let’s be real, if you’re dying to fit alcohol into your ketogenic diet and it’s a must have for you, I doubt the small amount that could possibly fit in will satisfy you. Here are a few things to consider if you’re to drink alcohol while trying to maintain a keto diet: You will undoubtedly get drunk much quicker on a ketogenic diet than if you weren’t. Hangovers will be worse, as you know a keto diet flushes your body of water retention and the chances that you’ll be staying hydrated while drinking is slim, alcohol is notorious for dehydrating you. Even if alcohol itself doesn’t kick you out of ketosis, when tipsy self-control goes out the window, you’re likely to eat whatever is in front of you. If you are determined to include alcohol in your ketogenic Continue reading >>

Alcohol Vs The Ketogenic Diet – Can I Drink It?

Alcohol Vs The Ketogenic Diet – Can I Drink It?

You’re at the bar, you want a drink, but you’re not sure about the alcohol because you are following a ketogenic diet. (To learn about the ketogenic diet click here). It is hard to be the only person at a social event who isn’t drinking. So, what would be my best choices? In general, hard liquor is usually a better choice than beer and wine. Hard liquor has less total carbs and less total calories compared to beer or wine. Drinking alcohol will slow the rate in which you lose weight. The strange thing is that drinking alcohol helps your liver make more ketones. The liver takes the alcohol and makes triglycerides which make more ketones. This can cause you to get drunk faster. It is important to drink lots of water because being in ketosis can make a hangover worse. Here is a list of low-carb alcohols: Liquor – Whiskey, Tequila, Vodka and Gin. Beer – Michelob Ultra, Bud Select and Miller 64. Wine – Dry red or white wines. Here are some different brands and their carb contents: Whiskey – most contain 96 – 105 calories Johnnie Walker 0 carbs Chivas Regal 0 carbs Jack Daniels 0 carbs Tequila – most contain 96 – 104 calories Don Julio 0 carbs Patron 0 carbs Cazadores 0 carbs Vodka – most contain 96 – 105 calories Smirnoff 0 carbs Grey Goose 0 carbs Ciroc 0 carbs Gin – most contain 96 – 116 calories Seagram’s 0 carbs Bombay 0 carbs Tanqueray 0 carbs Red Wine – most contain 121 – 129 calories Cabernet 4 carbs Pinot Noir 3 carbs Merlot 4 carbs Beer – most contain 55 – 119 calories Budweiser Select 3 carbs Miller 64 2 carbs Michelob Ultra 3 carbs What is the best low carb mixer? Sparkling water – this is the best choice. In general, most of the mixers such as diet sodas may be low in carbs but they are horrible for your health. They also m Continue reading >>

Drinking On Keto To Improve Your Diet

Drinking On Keto To Improve Your Diet

Drinking alcohol in moderation benefits your health and your diet. Before you start running down the street with an Atkins bar and a bottle, there are a few things you should know. The good and bad news about alcohol How to drink on a low carb or keto diet Alcohol lists: wine, liquor, beer, mixers Yes, low carb beer. Use our low carb alcohol quick list to keep those carbs in check. Alcohol, Keto and Low Carb Diets It’s all here. The good news (there’s plenty), the bad news and the safest way to drink on your diet. One warning: Please don’t go crazy. Hangovers on low carb are nightmarish. Ask around. First, the Bad News Like fructose, alcohol is a toxin and horrible for your liver. Studies show alcohol damages the liver more when high amounts of polyunsaturated fat is also being consumed. Thankfully, the low carb diet is already very low in polyunsaturated fat, adding some protection from the damage of alcohol on the liver. Warnings for Low Carbers Ketosis lowers your alcohol tolerance, so drink slowly. Alcohol disrupts coordination and fine motor skills, and causes a loss of inhibitions. Remember that time when… Of course you don’t. Be careful. While drinking alcohol, food cravings and temptations are more difficult to resist. Alcohol acts as a diuretic, causing dehydration and electrolyte imbalances. Can I Drink on a Keto Diet? Yes, but… Once you are stable on your diet it is perfectly fine to drink in moderation. Be aware of the carbs and calories in your drink, and the slowing effect it has on fat burning. Your body has no mechanism to store the energy in alcohol, so you will metabolize the calories in alcohol first. While your body is metabolizing alcohol, it is NOT metabolizing fat. Consuming alcohol will not knock you out of ketosis completely, but it Continue reading >>

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Alcohol On A Keto Diet: What Is Safe To Drink While In Ketosis?

Can you drink alcohol on a keto diet? Yes. It’s okay if you like to go out on the town and party it up. A lot of us do. It’s a part of our lives that we don’t want to stop. But you’re on a keto diet and you know that alcohol isn’t necessarily part of your diet. Don’t hesitate to go out and have a good time just because you’re on a keto diet. You can go out. You can drink. You just have to be smart about your choices when you’re drinking. Note: If you’re just learning about the keto diet then check out our free Guide to the Ketogenic Diet. Alcohol on Keto Diet It may seem like a daunting task, but if you start watching everything you’re drinking, you won’t have to worry about your body getting out of ketosis. Your body will still be able to stay the fat burner it was meant to be. If you don’t keep a close eye on your drinking habits, then you will slip back into your old ways and your body will once again be just a sugar burner and you may slowly see the weight creeping back onto your body. Aren’t sure if your body is in ketosis? Here are 7 Signs You’re in Ketosis. The Breakdown When you drink alcohol, your body is going to start breaking it down immediately because your body sees it as toxic. Go figure. As soon as your body recognizes that alcohol has entered your system, it begins to metabolize it and break it down. When drinking alcohol in excess, you will probably find that your weight loss will start to slow down. It could even stall completely. This is something that you definitely don’t want to happen, especially when you’re starting to see a lot of results. I’m assuming that you are already in ketosis, so your body will start to feel the drinks quicker. Your body is used to burning fats first now, so when you add alcohol, your bo Continue reading >>

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