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Ketosis Acidosis Symptoms

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine. The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin. Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin. Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium. Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked. Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection. In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended. Rates of DKA vary around the world. About 4% of people with type 1 diabetes in United Kingdom develop DKA a year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year. DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost universally fatal. The risk of death with adequate and timely treatment is currently around 1–4%. Up to 1% of children with DKA develop a complication known as cerebral edema. The symptoms of an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a period of about 24 hours. Predominant symptoms are nausea and vomiting, pronounced thirst, excessive urine production and abdominal pain that may be severe. Those who measure their glucose levels themselves may notice hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In severe DKA, breathing becomes labored and of a deep, gasping character (a state referred to as "Kussmaul respiration"). The abdomen may be tender to the point that an acute abdomen may be suspected, such as acute pancreatitis, appendicitis or gastrointestinal perforation. Coffee ground vomiting (vomiting of altered blood) occurs in a minority of people; this tends to originate from erosion of the esophagus. In severe DKA, there may be confusion, lethargy, stupor or even coma (a marked decrease in the level of consciousness). On physical examination there is usually clinical evidence of dehydration, such as a dry mouth and decreased skin turgor. If the dehydration is profound enough to cause a decrease in the circulating blood volume, tachycardia (a fast heart rate) and low blood pressure may be observed. Often, a "ketotic" odor is present, which is often described as "fruity", often compared to the smell of pear drops whose scent is a ketone. If Kussmaul respiration is present, this is reflected in an increased respiratory rate.....

Symptoms And Detection Of Ketoacidosis

* these are more specific for ketoacidosis than hyperosmolar syndrome Everyone with diabetes needs to know how to recognize and treat ketoacidosis. Ketones travel from the blood into the urine and can be detected in the urine with ketone test strips available at any pharmacy. Ketone strips should always be kept on hand, but stored in a dry area and replaced as soon as they become outdated. Measurement of Ketones in the urine is very important for diabetics with infections or on insulin pump therapy due to the fact it gives more information than glucose tests alone. Check the urine for ketones whenever a blood sugar reading is 300 mg/dl or higher, if a fruity odor is detected in the breath, if abdominal pain is present, if nausea or vomiting is occurring, or if you are breathing rapidly and short of breath. If a moderate or large amount of ketones are detected on the test strip, ketoacidosis is present and immediate treatment is required.  Symptoms for hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome are linked to dehydration rather than acidosis, so a fruity odor to the breath and stomach upset are less likely. During any illness, especially when it is severe and any time the stomach becomes Continue reading >>

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  1. mcs5309

    I have been eating low-carb paleo and IF 18/6 for the last 6 months and have been able to reduce some bodyfat which was the goal. I havbe a long way to go, so I added keto to the mix in the last couple weeks, increasing fat to about 65%, protein 30%, and carbs 5%.
    2 weeks prior to starting keto, my latest CMP showed elevated BUN (36 - ref range: 6-24), elevated BUN/Creatinine ratio (39 - ref range:9-20), and elevated urinary uric acid (1118.0 - ref range: 250.0-750.0). I also showed elevated serum calcium (10.9 - ref range: 8.7-10.2). My serum uric acid (UA), however, was normal (4.6 - ref range: 3.7-8.6) as is my creatinine (0.92 - ref range 0.76-1.27) and eGFR (95 - ref range >59). There is no protein in my urine. I do not have gout. These levels have gradually increased over the last 6 mos. I posted on my elevated BUN & uric acid recently: http://www.allthingsmale.com/forum/showthread.php?21082-Need-input-Elevated-BUN-urine-uric-acid
    Just yesterday noticed blood pressure remained elevated all day despite my usual BP-lowering supps. First time ever they had zero effect. I wonder if the increased intake of fats (SFAs) on the keto/low carb diet are causing this, as I have changed nothing else perhaps by increasing total cholesterol?
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9021429
    but this contradicts that:
    http://weightoftheevidence.blogspot.com/2006/02/what-does-saturated-fat-do-to-your.html
    Or could this be the beginning stages of kidney dysfunction, as it goes hand-in-hand with hypertension?
    According to this article, keto may help reduce BP, but may cause kidney stones, the very thing I'm trying to prevent from recurring:
    http://voices.yahoo.com/ketogenic-diets-help-control-blood-pressure-5349961.html
    More on keto and stones:
    http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2010/11/dangers-of-zero-carb-diets-iv-kidney-stones/
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17621514
    http://paleohacks.com/questions/14847/does-a-ketogenic-diet-cause-kidney-stones#axzz26twJurzQ
    And this excerpt from the Paul Jaminet link above explains my elevated uric acid as well:
    Uric Acid Production
    One difference between a ketogenic (or zero-carb) diet and a normal diet is the high rate of protein metabolism. If both glucose and ketones are generated from protein, then over 150 g protein per day is consumed in gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis. This releases a substantial amount of nitrogen. While urea is the main pathway for nitrogen disposal, uric acid is the excretion pathway for 1% to 3% of nitrogen. [7]
    This suggests that ketogenic dieters produce an extra 1 to 3 g/day uric acid from protein metabolism. A normal person excretes about 0.6 g/day. [8]
    In addition to kidney stones, excess uric acid production may lead to gout. Some Atkins and low-carb Paleo dieters have contracted gout.
    Perhaps I should cycle my protein intake as well as carbs? Increase fat even more?
    And what amount of water is recommended for low-carbers? Gallon/day?
    I'm at a loss as to what else I can do.
    Any feedback appreciated!

  2. seekonk

    The idea that this kind of diet is good for everyone is outdated. A significant percentage of people do worse on low-carb/high fat diets for genetic reasons. If you are interested, the SNPs are rs5082 (GG allele associated with worse health markers on high saturated fat diet), rs662799 (AA allele associated with higher BMI from diet with more than 30% fat), and rs1801282 (CC allele does not benefit from high monounsaturated fat diet w.r.t. BMI).

  3. mcs5309

    seekonk said: ↑
    The idea that this kind of diet is good for everyone is outdated. A significant percentage of people do worse on low-carb/high fat diets for genetic reasons. If you are interested, the SNPs are rs5082 (GG allele associated with worse health markers on high saturated fat diet), rs662799 (AA allele associated with higher BMI from diet with more than 30% fat), and rs1801282 (CC allele does not benefit from high monounsaturated fat diet w.r.t. BMI). Thanks. Where can one get these tests done? Regular labs like Labcorp and Quest don't do them.

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Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis Vs Ketoacidosis

Is Keto Healthy? Ketosis vs Ketoacidosis When looking at a ketogenic diet and ketosis, it’s common for some people to confuse the process with a harmful, more extreme version of this state known as diabetic ketoacidosis. But there are a lot of misconceptions out there about ketosis vs ketoacidosis, and it’s time to shed some light on the subject by looking at the (very big) differences between the two. An Overview of Ketosis A ketogenic, or keto, diet is centered around the process of ketosis, so it’s important to understand exactly what ketosis is first before we get into whether or not it’s safe (spoiler: it is): Ketosis is a metabolic state where the body is primarily using fat for energy instead of carbohydrates. Burning carbohydrates (glucose) for energy is the default function of the body, so if glucose is available, the body will use that first. But during ketosis, the body is using ketones instead of glucose. This is an amazing survival adaptation by the body for handling periods of famine or fasting, extreme exercise, or anything else that leaves the body without enough glucose for fuel. Those eating a ketogenic diet purposely limit their carb intake (usually betwe Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. RachelZen

    Okay I have water fasted several times before, no worries I simply avoid being "too close" to anyone. In past relationships they know that my breath is pleasant most of the time,except around fasting time.
    This is a first date/meeting with a new guy.We'll probably go for a walk or see a show. I've already postponed before because of work(2 weeks already) and I don't want him to think I'm not interested in getting together. What can I do to NOT turn him completely off with my breath.I'm a kisser, but not sure during fasting.lol. This is day 2 of 10-14 day fast.Any ideas or suggestions?

  2. TheFastDoctor

    TheFastDoctor replied the topic: Re:Fasting Breath (yikes) and first date
    The "Smell" in your breath when you fast is primarily Ketones. When you break down fat, you make glycerol and ketones. The latter has a peculiar smell. It is volatile, so when you breath out, it will be in your breath. You could MASK it with a more potent smell, but you cannot hide it. Your own olfactory nerve accommodates after a while so you are blissfully unaware of the smell yourself.
    I can think of no way to get around this "problem" other than to be honest. Tell the guy you are fasting, and why, and that this causes your fat to be turned into Acetone, HydroxyButyric acid and now I forgot what the third ketone is.. and that you are breathing it out.
    We who know what fasting is all about, love the smell of ketones. But other people often don't, largely due to ignorance.
    Honesty is the best policy.
    André
    All my posts are "generic", based on my opinions and experiences only and are not intended to replace the advice of your own licensed medical practitioner.

  3. RachelZen

    I'm clear on why breath smells.Yes, he already knows I'm fasting That's why we're not going to dinner.With so many life long fasters on the board I thought someone might have a breath masking tip to share. My old standby is constant tongue brushing with baking soda and if I really, really need to - a breath mint. Any other suggestions.
    RachelZen

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Signs and symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis - symptoms of diabetic coma What is Diabetic Ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal condition Happens when blood sugar levels are too high for an extended period of time When high blood sugar does not get treated, ketones gather in the blood and urine Signs and Symptoms of Diabeticketoacidosis Excessive urination, Extreme thirst and dry mouth Extreme fatigue or weakness and decreased appetite Fruity odor of breath or metallic taste in mouth Nausea and Vomiting and Abdominal pain Breathlessness or difficulty in taking breath Disorientation and confusion leading to Loss of consciousness and coma diabetic ketoacidosis anion gap diabetic ketoacidosis lab values diabetic ketoacidosis pathophysiology pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the Continue reading >>

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  1. sharidoto

    HOW MANY DAYS OF STRICK EATING DOES IT NOEMALLY TAKE BEFORE THE STRIPS START TO SHOW YOUR BURNING FAT??
    DREAM,CREATE,INSPIRE AND LOVE YOU HAVE THE PERFECT LIFE !

  2. ljessica0501

    It varies for everyone. For me personally...it took 4 days to register anything and almost 2 weeks to get purple...I have never seen the darkest purple shade. Some people will tell you not to use the sticks, but I like them. My doctor told me to use them 3 times a day for a week to see when my body is the highest. Again...everyone is different. I am highest in the morning, but I hear some people are highest at night.
    Lauren
    Your goals, minus your doubts, equal your reality. - Ralph Marston

  3. PeeFat

    Your body has to burn off all the stored sugar before it goes into ketosis. The shade on the stick should read ' moderate. ' Any higher means you aren't drinking enough water to flush out excess ketones. Too many ketones in your body is unhealthy. So don't think you have to be in the darkest purple range to be eating properly. Also the best time to test is first thing in the morning. Only diabetics need check more than once a day. On atkins we don't even need to use keto sticks. If you follow the rules you will be in ketosis.

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