diabetestalk.net

Ketones With Low Blood Sugar

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

A diabetic coma is one of the most life-threatening complications of diabetes. The main symptom is unconsciousness. A diabetic coma can be the result of having a blood glucose level that is too high (hyperglycemia) or a blood glucose level that is too low (hypoglycemia). The diabetic in a diabetic coma is unconscious and can die if the condition is not treated. Symptoms of Diabetic Coma Before you lapse into a diabetic coma, there are usually warning signs of blood sugar levels that are too low or blood sugar levels that are too high. For example, if the blood sugar is too high, the you may experience tiredness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, increased urination, increased thirst, a rapid heart rate, a dry mouth, and a fruity smell to your breath. If the blood sugar is too low, you may experience signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, including weakness, tiredness, anxiety, tremulousness, nervousness, nausea, confusion, problems communicating, light-headedness, hunger, or dizziness. If you have had diabetes for many years, you may not have many symptoms of low blood sugar and won’t know you have the condition prior to falling into a coma. If you suspect that you have either high blood sugar or low blood sugar, you need to check your blood glucose levels and do what your doctor has recommended for you to treat the disease. If you don’t feel better after trying home remedies, you need to call 911 and get some kind of emergency care. Causes of Diabetic Coma The main cause of a diabetic coma is an extremely high blood sugar or an extremely low blood sugar. The following medical conditions can cause a diabetic coma: Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. This is a condition in which the blood sugar is as high as 600 mg/d: or 33.3 mmol per liter. There are no ketones in the u Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

The Significance Of Blood Sugar Measurements In Newborns

The Significance Of Blood Sugar Measurements In Newborns

So, let’s say have new term baby with a measured glucose of 28. Does that baby have symptoms? Kids without symptoms are doing something right. We do not need to intervene because our exam told us the baby looked good. The number did not add to our management and therefore we did not need it. That glucose of 28 may mean nothing if the baby makes up for it with creation of alternative fuels (which they do normally). Kids with no symptoms from their low blood sugar (however we define it) do not need to be treated. Our next step is to do what we should be doing already: skin-to-skin snuggling, feeding within an hour after birth, and frequent breastfeeding with rooming-in. When we treat an asymptomatic child with a "low" blood sugar (again, however it is defined) with something other than breastmilk, the production of alternative fuels gets messed up. The baby needed a low blood glucose to start the pathways that create alternative fuel production. When we give formula or glucose water, we are giving glucose, and those other pathways that created ketone bodies, pyruvate and lactate as compensation for the low blood sugar are now not needed. Those other newborn pathways may be delayed in working or just stop. Because we messed with normal physiology, and may have interrupted alternate fuel production, the babies may need continued supplementation to maintain normal blood glucose. The production of alternative fuels does not just work to meet the energy needs of the brain. Ketone bodies are also used in brain myelination (nerve growth) and the creation of lung surfactant (lung function). That means that the normal dip in blood glucose, which creates other fuels, leads to brain energy, nerve growth and lung development. We want that to occur without interruption. We should no Continue reading >>

High Ketones But Low Blood Sugar

High Ketones But Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been off work ill for the last week with the wonderful winter vomiting virus. Im pretty much ok from it now. BEcuase ive not been well I have followed the rules and tested a bit more than usual, and my readings have been low as expected as ive only really just got my apetite back. What i didnt know i should be doing was checking urine for ketones. Historically ive not got more than a + when bs has been 15+. Now that i have been testing, im getting readings of ++++, a super dark browney purple colour, but my bs is only 9. bumping this in the hopes someone can help. Because you haven't been eating you are burning fat for energy and the by-product is the ketones. You can stop this if you can keep some carbs down and give yourself insulin. You are Type 1 I gather. My son's doctor wasn't overly concerned about the ketones when he last had the vomits but I certainly kept an eye on the amount over the course of the illness. You do have to manage ketones and blood sugar while sick but it isn't always easy. I have a blood ketone tester as urine ones aren't really very acurate. Try and keep some fluid down by sipping small amounts of water often. You can also get yourself some hydralyte or gastrolyte. Continue reading >>

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

What Is The Ph Of The Blood In A Diabetic Patient When His Glucose Levels Are Appropriate?

Diabetes causes your body's pH levels to become more acidic and develop a condition called ketoacidosis, the American Diabetes Association explains. Your body's pH level refers to the acidity or alkalinity of the fluids in your body. Diabetes impairs your body's ability to properly utilize the glucose in your blood. Instead, your body is forced to convert fat into energy through a process that develops into ketoacidosis. Diagnosing ketoacidosis involves testing blood for the presence of ketones, the University of Maryland Medical Center explains. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is congenital, and its symptoms appear as early as childhood, MayoClinic.com explains. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by your body's inability to produce insulin, the hormone needed for cells to metabolize glucose into energy. Type 2 diabetes is essentially defined by acquired insulin resistance that usually manifests in adulthood. Both types of diabetes cause increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss, hypertension and ketoacidosis. Left untreated, both types of diabetes lead to complications that damage your cardiovascular system, kidneys and nerves due to the accumulated glucose in your blood. Complications due to diabetes such as ketoacidosis are fatal if not treated. Ketones are the acidic byproducts of fat breakdown that accumulate when your body uses fat instead of glucose as a source of fuel, MedlinePlus, a service of the National Institutes of Health, explains. As your ketone levels increase, your body becomes more acidic. Ketones are present in both types of diabetes but are generally more typical of type 1 diabetes. Ketones are also sometimes present in urine. Acetone and acetoacetic acid are examples of ketones. Ketoacidosis does not happen o Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

What are ketones and what causes them? Ketones are the result of the body burning fat for energy or fuel. For a person with diabetes, ketones are often the result of prolonged high blood sugar and insulin deficiency. Without the right amount of insulin, glucose starts to build up in the blood stream and doesn't enter the cells. The cells burn fat instead of glucose, and ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. Some causes of high blood sugar are: Missing an insulin dose or skipping some oral medications. A disconnected or blocked insulin pump tube. Being sick with the flu. High levels of stress. Eating more carbohydrates than your medication covers. What are the signs that I should test for ketones? Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, frequent thirst, blurry vision, dry mouth, vomiting, and fatigue. There are several scenarios that should prompt a test for ketones. If your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. When your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl and you are planning on exercising. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and whenever blood sugars are elevated. How do I test for ketones? There are two ways to test for ketones - by testing your urine or your blood. Ketones appear first in the blood stream and are later present in the urine, so testing your blood for ketones is the best way to check for an early problem. To check urine for ketones, you must collect a urine sample or dip a ketone test strip into a fresh stream of urine. After waiting for the time suggested by the ketone strip manufacturer, you compare the color strip to the chart on the bottle. The darker the color, the higher the amount of ketones in the urine. At this time, there are just a few mete Continue reading >>

Child Health Library

Child Health Library

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

Monitoring Ketone And Blood Glucose Levels On A Low Carb Diet

Monitoring Ketone And Blood Glucose Levels On A Low Carb Diet

By Mary T. Newport M.D. While it is not necessary to measure ketone levels, many people who make the change to a low carb, ketogenic diet and/or use ketone salts would like to have some positive proof that their ketone levels are, in fact, elevated. When transitioning from a higher carb to a low carb, ketogenic type diet, it can take several days to begin to see an increase in ketone levels and the ketone level may continue to rise for two or three weeks before it levels off. The ketone level can fluctuate somewhat throughout the day and can vary considerably from person to person. Using ketone salts, such as Prüvit KETO//OS® or KETO//OS Max, as a supplement can give you a jump start on getting into ketosis and increase ketone levels within 30 to 60 minutes of taking the product. Using coconut oil and MCT oil as part of the diet can help increase and sustain ketone levels as well. There are several ways available to measure ketone levels in urine, blood or by using a breath analyzer. When blood levels of ketones become elevated, the excess ketones will filter out of the blood into the urine. Urine ketone test strips were originally developed for diabetics to help determine if they are going into diabetic ketoacidosis when the blood sugar is elevated. There are a number of companies that sell urine test strips that change color when ketone levels are elevated – usually the deeper the color, the higher the ketone level. This will not tell you what your actual blood ketone level is but can give you a rough idea of whether you are in ketosis or not. However, one of the drawbacks to using urine test strips is that they only measure the ketone acetoacetate and not beta-hydroxybutyrate, which tends to be much more elevated than acetoacetate during ketosis. Also, Prüvit ke Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

When we're stressed, our bodies need extra energy to help us cope and recover. This is true whether bodies are under stress from illness or injury or are dealing with the effects of emotional stress, both good and bad. To meet the demand for more energy, the body responds by releasing into the bloodstream sugar that's been stored in the liver, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In someone without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the rise in blood sugar by releasing enough insulin into the bloodstream to help convert the sugar into energy. This brings blood sugar levels back down to normal. In someone with diabetes, the extra demand usually means needing to take more diabetes medicine (insulin or pills.) To make sure your body is getting enough medicine to help keep your blood sugar levels close to normal, you'll need to test more often when you are: Sick Recovering from surgery Fighting an infection Feeling upset Under more stress than usual Traveling Type 1 Diabetes In people with type 1 diabetes, blood sugar levels rise in response to stress, but the body doesn't have enough insulin to turn the sugar into energy. Instead, the body burns stored fat to meet energy needs. When fat is burned for energy, it creates waste products called ketones. As fat is broken down, ketones start to build up in the bloodstream. High levels of ketones in the blood can lead to a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can cause a person to lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma. Type 2 Diabetes In people with type 2 diabetes, the body usually has enough insulin available to turn sugar into energy, so it doesn't need to burn fat. However, stress hormones can cause blood sugar levels to rise to very high and even dangerous levels. People with type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Facts Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that may occur in people who have diabetes, most often in those who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. It involves the buildup of toxic substances called ketones that make the blood too acidic. High ketone levels can be readily managed, but if they aren't detected and treated in time, a person can eventually slip into a fatal coma. DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. Although much less common, DKA can occasionally occur in people with type 2 diabetes under extreme physiologic stress. Causes With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body's cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can't get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn't available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body's metabolic processes aren't able Continue reading >>

For The Love Of Exogenous Ketones!

For The Love Of Exogenous Ketones!

You read that correctly. I love ketones and I am actively pursuing ways to increase my bodies ability to produce them through the use of exogenous ketone supplements. Ketones are a dirty word in the world of diabetes because of the confusion surrounding their appearance as the harbinger of doom through DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis). Unfortunately many healthcare providers actively discourage their diabetic patients from attempting to achieve nutritional ketosis because they don’t fully understand the difference between nutritional ketosis and DKA. That difference is NOT the focus of this post, other than to establish the fact that there IS a difference. It’s important to note that the means of detecting DKA is typically the presence of ketones in the blood. Adding them through exogenous supplementation or nutritional ketosis is useful (I would even argue beneficial), but not without some risk. In case of insulin deficiency (bad pump site, occlusion, skipped dose etc) while in ketosis one would be without the means to clearly identify DKA. You’d only be able to guess based on blood glucose level to infer how insulin deficient you are. The risk can be mitigated through vigilance and attention to insulin dosing but shouldn’t be taken lightly. I’ve recently started using exogenous ketones to help put me into nutritional ketosis more readily and I wanted to report the initial findings since I’ve been asked about them so many times. Up till this point I didn’t feel compelled to spend the time and money on exogenous ketone supplements–which are not cheap! I took the plunge and got some delicious, chocolate-flavored betahydroxybutyrate or (BHB) for short. I am not going to attempt to get into the science behind the impacts of BHB on my blood sugar, energy and meta Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia refers to low blood sugar, or technically a lower than normal blood glucose level. It is rarely encountered in pediatric practice outside of the newborn nursery, where it is a commonplace event. Profound hypoglycemia in the newborn can cause brain damage. Aggressive blood glucose monitoring of asymptomatic (nothing appears to be wrong) infants has been the standard. I think attitudes are softening in the era of cost-benefit analysis, since many babies seem to be subjected to large numbers of (in retrospect) needless blood glucose determinations compared to the actual number of significant problems identified. Symptoms of hypoglycemia are generally related to the body's efforts to raise the blood glucose level back to where it should be. These symptoms are really just the manifestations of adrenaline (epinephrine) release, which is the chief signal the body uses to mobilise stored glucose into the bloodstream. The most noticable adrenaline effects are nervousness, light-headedness, increased heart rate, and a particularly urgent sense of hunger. Headache is sometimes a symptom of hypoglycemia; I believe the explanation is brain neuronal cell dysfunction. In the newborn, symptoms of hypoglycemia include sweating, jitteriness, rapid breathing, rapid heart rate, pallor, or even apnea. Profound or very difficult to treat hypoglycemia in a newborn can signal the presence of rare but dangerous conditions such as galactosemia, growth hormone deficiency, insulin secreting tumors, or may reflect severe intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Hypoglycemia is the opposite of hyperglycemia - high blood glucose - which is the hallmark of diabetes. True hypoglycemia in children older than newborns is reasonably rare and is not the cause of the myriad complaints and condit Continue reading >>

#12: Hypoglycemia – Can Ketones Help Fuel The Brain?

#12: Hypoglycemia – Can Ketones Help Fuel The Brain?

The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial It is estimated that iatrogenic hypoglycemia is responsible for 6-10% of deaths in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) completed in 1993 showed that “Intensive (insulin) therapy effectively delays the onset of and slows the progression of diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).” Consuming a diet high in carbohydrates as was the practice in 1993 (and for most part in 2015) combined with high doses of insulin leads to both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. At the beginning of the DCCT, mean insulin doses were 0.62-0.72 U/kg/day. The insulin doses were increased (but not reported) in the intensive insulin therapy group and this increase resulted in both weight gain (with a 33% increase in the mean adjusted risk of becoming overweight) and a three-fold increase in severe hypoglycemia (“severe” meant requiring assistance including seizure or coma). In addition, the glycemic goal of the intensive insulin therapy group was HbA1c < 6.05%, but less than 5% maintained the goal and the mean HbA1c actually achieved was ≈7% (presumably to avoid hypoglycemia). The DCCT clearly showed that improving glycemic control (lowering HbA1c) reduced the incidence and progression of diabetic complications. Another conclusion still applies today, “we recommend that most patients with IDDM be treated with closely monitored intensive regimens, with the goal of maintaining their glycemic status as close to the normal range as safely possible. Because of the risk of hypoglycemia, intensive insulin therapy should be implemented with caution, especially in patients with repeated severe hypoglycemia.” Asymptomatic Hypoglycemi Continue reading >>

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

Ketone Testing: What You Need To Know

What are ketones? Ketones are produced when the body burns fat for energy or fuel. They are also produced when you lose weight or if there is not enough insulin to help your body use sugar for energy. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood. Since the body is unable to use glucose for energy, it breaks down fat instead. When this occurs, ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. These ketones can make you very sick. How can I test for ketones? You can test to see if your body is making any ketones by doing a simple urine test. There are several products available for ketone testing and they can be purchased, without a prescription, at your pharmacy. The test result can be negative, or show small, moderate, or large quantities of ketones. When should I test for ketones? Anytime your blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. Often illness, infections, or injuries will cause sudden high blood glucose and this is an especially important time to check for ketones. When you are planning to exercise and the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and any time the blood glucose is over 250 mg/dl. If ketones are positive, what does this mean? There are situations when you might have ketones without the blood glucose being too high. Positive ketones are not a problem when blood glucose levels are within range and you are trying to lose weight. It is a problem if blood glucose levels are high and left untreated. Untreated high blood glucose with positive ketones can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). What should I do if the ketone test is positive? Call your diabetes educator or physician, as you may need additional Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

More in ketosis