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Ketones Low Blood Sugar

Large Ketones - Low Blood Sugar!??

Large Ketones - Low Blood Sugar!??

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Last night, dd went to bed. About an hour later she started sweating Since she was around 1 years old, she started to sweat after she fell asleep. I have asked ALL her peds, they all said it was normal. Last night was different, she was drenched. Her bs dropped about 30 points, but still normal. She continued to drop points, and sweat beyond relief. She finally stopped sweating, but was hot and clammy, and red the whole night. She continued to drop all night, and I brought her up. She didn't get dangerously low, because I was checking her so much. This morning I tell her to check ketones. I don't know why, she was low all night, and woke up with a low, but normal number. LARGE KETONES! Finally go the blood ketone meter, showed .0.2 So, within an hour, ketones were totally gone. She drank, drank, drank, ate carbs and got Novolog. Okay... My question, how the heck did she get LARGE KETONES with low blood sugar!? Google is not my friend with this question Called the doc, and they want me to get this new ped to do blood on tests on the sweating. Ketones just means you are burning fat - it is not a result of being high. The body is made to burn fat and so you are made to have ketones when necessary. If the ketone meter is 0.2 you've nothing to worry about. What matters is if you are burning fat because of lack of glucose & insulin ("starvation ketones"), or lack of insulin. She was that in the morning, but the urine test showed LARGE, so that showed she had ketones about four hours prior, right? How do you know if it's starvation ketones? She was that in the morning, but the urine test showed LARGE, so that showed she had ketones about four hours prior, right? How do Continue reading >>

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

How To Easily Track Your Glucose Ketone Index (gki) On Your Ketogenic Diet

Tracking ketone levels is a large part of success on the ketogenic diet. It helps you know how far you are into ketosis and where we might need to make changes. But did you know that there’s an even better way to step it up a notch? The glucose ketone index is a simple calculation that allows you to find out how ketosis works best for you individually. Without it, you could be in full, high-level ketosis yet still not getting the full benefits. In this post, we’ll be looking at how to easily track your glucose ketone index for different aspects of health along with your ketogenic diet. Basics of the Glucose Ketone Index Here’s what you need to know about the glucose ketone index (GKI): Researchers have used the index in studies on the ketogenic diet, fasting, and more. Additionally, it has been used for tracking changes and progress regarding weight loss, athletic performance, management of metabolic diseases like type 2 diabetes, and even cancer treatment. Now that we’ve covered the basics of what the GKI does, let’s talk about how you can use tracking it to your advantage. Tracking Your Glucose Ketone Index What’s so special about the glucose ketone index is that it lets you track both glucose and ketones at the same time, taking into account how they work together. It’s a way to know your optimal state for addressing all sorts of health conditions. Tracking this number benefits you over simply measuring ketone levels. That’s because even if you’re deeply in ketosis, you could still have high blood glucose levels that throw things off and affect your health. Essentially, it gives you a more full picture of your metabolic health. The numbers you can expect to target depend on your intentions for being in ketosis. Is your goal weight loss, better overa Continue reading >>

Caution: Don’t Get Caught With Ketones

Caution: Don’t Get Caught With Ketones

Ketoacidosis is an extremely serious diabetic complication that can lead to coma and even death. Unfortunately it is also fairly common. The good news, however, is that with proper care and an eye towards prevention, this costly and dangerous complication can be avoided. What Is Ketoacidosis? When there isn't enough insulin present for the metabolism of glucose, or when insufficient food has been eaten to satisfy energy requirements, the body burns fat for energy. Ketones are toxic, acidic byproducts of this process. Ketones are normally processed by the kidneys and excreted in the urine. But when more ketones are produced than the kidneys can handle, they can build up in the blood and lead to a dangerous condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Ketoacidosis raises the acidity of the body, which leads to "a cascade of problems throwing off a number a parameters in the body," says Cindy Onufer, RN, MA, CDE, the diabetes research and clinical care coordinator at Oregon Health Sciences University. Ketoacidosis rarely occurs in people with type 2 diabetes, who usually do not suffer from insufficiency of insulin, but is of great concern to those with type 1 diabetes. In fact, ketoacidosis is the number one cause of hospitalization for children with known diabetes in the United States. However, these hospitalizations are completely preventable if a urine ketone test is done and a care provider is called when indicated, says H. Peter Chase, MD, with the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes in Denver, Colorado. Timely testing and prevention are of utmost importance as the condition can cause coma and death if proper treatment is not administered quickly. Higher ketone levels are a warning sign that your diabetes is out of control or that you may be in danger of ke Continue reading >>

Pediatric Non-diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Case-series Report

Pediatric Non-diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Case-series Report

Pediatric non-diabetic ketoacidosis: a case-series report We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Pediatric non-diabetic ketoacidosis: a case-series report Ke Bai, Yueqiang Fu, [...], and Min Zhu This study is to explore the clinical characteristics, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment outcomes in pediatric patients with non-diabetic ketoacidosis. Retrospective patient chart review was performed between March 2009 to March 2015. Cases were included if they met the selection criteria for non-diabetic ketoacidosis, which were: 1) Age 18years; 2) urine ketone positive ++ or >8.0mmol/L; 3) blood ketone >3.1mmol/L; 4) acidosis (pH < 7.3) and/or HCO3 < 15mmol/L; 5) random blood glucose level < 11.1mmol/L. Patients who met the criteria 1, 4, 5, plus either 2 or 3, were defined as non-diabetic ketoacidosis and were included in the report. Five patients with 7 episodes of non-diabetic ketoacidosis were identified. They all presented with dehydration, poor appetite, and Kussmaul breathing. Patients treated with insulin plus glucose supplementation had a quicker recovery from acidosis, in comparison to those treated with bicarbonate infusion and continuous renal replacement therapy. Two patients treated with bicarbonate infusion developed transient coma and seizures during the treatment. Despite normal or low blood glucose levels, patients with non-diabetic ketoacidosis should receive insulin administration with glucose supplementa Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ketones

Diabetes And Ketones

Tweet The presence of high levels of ketones in the bloodstream is a common complication of diabetes, which if left untreated can lead to ketoacidosis. Ketones build up when there is insufficient insulin to help fuel the body’s cells. High levels of ketones are therefore more common in people with type 1 diabetes or people with advanced type 2 diabetes. If you are suffering from high levels of ketones and seeking medical advice, contact your GP or diabetes healthcare team as soon as possible. What are ketones? Ketones are an acid remaining when the body burns its own fat. When the body has insufficient insulin, it cannot get glucose from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy and will instead begin to burn fat. The liver converts fatty acids into ketones which are then released into the bloodstream for use as energy. It is normal to have a low level of ketones as ketones will be produced whenever body fat is burned. In people that are insulin dependent, such as people with type 1 diabetes, however, high levels of ketones in the blood can result from taking too little insulin and this can lead to a particularly dangerous condition known as ketoacidosis. How do I test for ketones? Ketone testing can be carried out at home. The most accurate way of testing for ketones is to use a blood glucose meter which can test for ketones as well as blood glucose levels. You can also test urine for ketone levels, however, the testing of urine means that the level you get is representative of your ketone levels up to a few hours ago. Read about testing for ketones and how to interpret the results Who needs to be aware of ketones? The following people with diabetes should be aware of ketones and the symptoms of ketoacidosis: Anyone dependent on insulin – such as all people Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

What Are Ketones And Their Tests?

A ketone test can warn you of a serious diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. An elevated level of this substance in your blood can mean you have very high blood sugar. Too many ketones can trigger DKA, which is a medical emergency. Regular tests you take at home can spot when your ketone levels run too high. Then you can take insulin to lower your blood sugar level or get other treatments to prevent complications. What Exactly Are Ketones? Everyone has them, whether you have diabetes or not. Ketones are chemicals made in your liver. You produce them when you don't have enough of the hormone insulin in your body to turn sugar (or “glucose”) into energy. You need another source, so your body uses fat instead. Your liver turns this fat into ketones, a type of acid, and sends them into your bloodstream. Your muscles and other tissues can then use them for fuel. For a person without diabetes, this process doesn’t become an issue. But when you have diabetes, things can run out of control and you build up too many ketones in your blood. If the level goes too high, it can become life-threatening. Who Needs a Ketone Test? You might need one if you have type 1 diabetes. In this type, your immune system attacks and destroys cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Without it, your blood sugar rises. People with type 2 diabetes can also get high ketones, but it isn't as common as it is with type 1. Tests can show you when your level gets high so you can treat it before you get sick. When Should You Test? Your doctor will probably tell you to test your ketones when: Your blood sugar is higher than 250 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dl) for two days in a row You're sick or you've been injured You want to exercise and your blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Your body needs a constant source of energy. When you have plenty of insulin, your body cells can get all the energy they need from glucose. If you don't have enough insulin in your blood, your liver is programmed to manufacture emergency fuels. These fuels, made from fat, are called ketones (or keto acids). In a pinch, ketones can give you energy. However, if your body stays dependent on ketones for energy for too long, you soon will become ill. Ketones are acidic chemicals that are toxic at high concentrations. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketones build up in the blood, seriously altering the normal chemistry of the blood and interfering with the function of multiple organs. They make the blood acidic, which causes vomiting and abdominal pain. If the acid level of the blood becomes extreme, ketoacidosis can cause falling blood pressure, coma and death. Ketoacidosis is always accompanied by dehydration, which is caused by high levels of Continue reading >>

Making Sense Of Ketones With Diabetes

Making Sense Of Ketones With Diabetes

Learn what ketones are, how they are measured, and what to do with the information Some people with diabetes have a higher risk for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) which can be a frightening complication (click here for a background on DKA). Type 1 patients are at higher risk than type 2 patients, and among type 1 patients, those who are on a class of drugs called SGLT-2 inhibitors are more susceptible to DKA. The good news is that keeping tabs on ketone levels at home can help lower the chance of this complication. This article will break down what ketones are, how and when to measure ketones, and what to do with different ketone levels. For more in-depth information on when it is most important to measure ketones, click here for our deep dive on DKA. Ketones are alternative fuels for the body when its cells are low on glucose (sugar) for a prolonged period of time; this mechanism originally evolved to help humans cope with long periods without food. When body cells are low on sugar (in diabetes, usually as a result of lack of insulin, the key needed for sugar to enter cells), the body releases fat stored in fat cells; the fat then travels to the liver, where it is broken down into ketones, which are used as fuel instead of glucose. This is usually not problematic. Having too many ketones in the blood is called ketosis, and its common to be in a low-level state of ketosis when waking up in the morning, as the body was fasting during the night. Because ketosis is the result of fat breakdown, a popular weight loss method is the ketogenic (keto) diet, which uses specific foods low in carbs and thus, low in sugar to move the body toward burning fat for energy. The risk with ketones, however, is that too many in the blood makes it acidic, leading to DKA. To be clear, eating a Continue reading >>

Dka (ketoacidosis) & Ketones

Dka (ketoacidosis) & Ketones

If your deductible reset on January 1, there are new programs to help you afford your insulin prescription| Learn more Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious condition that can lead to diabeticcoma(passing out for a long time) or even death. When your cells don't get the glucose they need for energy, your body begins to burn fat for energy, which produces ketones. Ketones are chemicals that the body creates when it breaks downfatto use for energy. The body does this when it doesnt have enoughinsulinto useglucose, the bodys normal source of energy. When ketones build up in the blood, they make it more acidic. They are a warning sign that your diabetes is out of control or that you are getting sick. High levels of ketones can poison the body. When levels get too high, you can develop DKA. DKA may happen to anyone with diabetes, though it is rare in people with type 2. Treatment for DKA usually takes place in the hospital. But you can help prevent it by learning the warning signs and checking yoururineand blood regularly. DKA usually develops slowly. But when vomiting occurs, this life-threatening condition can develop in a few hours. Early symptoms include the following: (Vomiting can be caused by many illnesses, not just ketoacidosis. If vomiting continues for more than 2 hours, contact your health care provider.) A hard time paying attention, or confusion Ketoacidosis (DKA) is dangerous and serious. If you have any of the above symptoms, contact your health care provider IMMEDIATELY, or go to the nearest emergency room of your local hospital. You can detect ketones with a simple urine test using a test strip, similar to a blood testing strip. Ask your health care provider when and how you should test for ketones. Many experts advise to check your urine for ketones wh Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs when the body does not have enough insulin. Insulin is what breaks down sugar into energy. When insulin is not present to break down sugars, our body begins to break down fat. Fat break down produces ketones which spill into the urine and cause glucose build up in the blood, thus acidifying the body. Because sugar is not entering into our body’s cells for energy breakdown, the sugar is being processed by the kidneys and excreted through the urine; as a result, we become dehydrated and our blood becomes even more acidic. This leads to sickness and hospitalization if not treated. If a person’s blood sugar is over 240, they should start checking their blood for ketones. If you have diabetes, or love someone who does, being aware of warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can help save a life. Early Symptoms of DKA: High blood glucose level, usually > 300 High volume to ketones present in blood or urine Frequent urination or thirst that lasts for a day or more Dry skin and mouth Rapid shallow breathing Abdominal pain (especially in children) Muscle stiffness or aches Flushed face As DKA Worsens: Decreases alertness, confusion – brain is dehydrating Deep, labored, and gasping breathing Headache Breath that smells fruity or like fingernail polish remover Nausea and/or vomiting Abdomen may be tender and hurt if touched Decreased consciousness, coma, death If you think you might have DKA, test for ketones. If ketones are present, call your health care provider right away. To treat high blood sugar, hydrate with water or sugar free, caffeine free drinks. Sugar free popsicles and snacks are also good alternatives. Always call the doctor if vomiting goes on for more than two hours. Symptoms can go from mild Continue reading >>

Metabolic Ketoacidosis With Normal Blood Glucose: A Rare Complication Of Sodiumglucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors

Metabolic Ketoacidosis With Normal Blood Glucose: A Rare Complication Of Sodiumglucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors

Metabolic ketoacidosis with normal blood glucose: A rare complication of sodiumglucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer Department of Internal Medicine, Temple University/Conemaugh Memorial Hospital, Johnstown, PA, USA Saad Ullah, Department of Internal Medicine, Temple University/Conemaugh Memorial Hospital, 1086 Franklin Street, Johnstown, PA 15905, USA. Email: [email protected] Received 2016 Jul 18; Accepted 2016 Sep 26. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 License ( ) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access page( ). This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Ketoacidosis is a significant and often a life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus seen mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus as well as occasionally in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually manifests with high blood glucose more than 250 mg/dL, but euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis is defined as ketoacidosis associated with blood glucose level less than 250 mg/dL. Normal blood glucose in such patients results in significant delay in diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis, thus increasing mortality and morbidity. We present a case of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis secondary to canagliflozin in a type 2 diabetic patient. Keywords: Diabetes/endocrinology, canagliflozin, diabetic ketoacidosis, euglycemic, metabolic acidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus but also in patients with Continue reading >>

Ketones — The 6 Must-knows

Ketones — The 6 Must-knows

WRITTEN BY: Kyla Schmieg, BSN, RN Editor’s Note: Kyla Schmieg (BSN, RN) is a practicing pediatric endocrinology nurse in Cincinnati, OH, USA, and Type 1 Diabetic, working on the same unit she was diagnosed at 26 years ago. 1 – What are ketones? Ketones are chemicals that build up when your body starts to burn fat for energy. The most common cause of ketones in diabetics is insulin deficiency. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood stream and can’t enter cells. The cells then burn fat instead of glucose. This results in ketones forming in the blood and eventually spilling into urine. 2 – Why can ketones be dangerous? Having ketones can indicate that your body needs more insulin. (Always monitor your blood sugar levels to know how much insulin you need.) If you have a build up of ketones, this can lead to Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Signs of DKA include moderate or large ketones, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fruity or acetone (think nail polish remover) breath, rapid breathing, flushed skin, and lack of energy. If left untreated, it can lead to a serious and life-threatening diabetic coma or death. High levels of ketones are toxic to the body and if you’re experiencing these, you should seek out medical attention. 3 – When should you check for ketones? You should be checked anytime your blood sugar is above 240 mg/dl (13.3 mmol/l) or any time you are sick. This includes any minor illness such as a cold. 4 – Can you get ketones with a high blood sugar? Ketones typically accompany high blood sugar. They indicate that your body needs more insulin. Most often if your body needs more insulin, it means you probably have a high blood sugar. Also, when an illness is present, your body releases hormones in response to the stress. These hormones Continue reading >>

Ketones In Blood: Medlineplus Lab Test Information

Ketones In Blood: Medlineplus Lab Test Information

What happens during a ketones in blood test? A health care professional will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm, using a small needle. After the needle is inserted, a small amount of blood will be collected into a test tube or vial. You may feel a little sting when the needle goes in or out. This usually takes less than five minutes. You may also be able to use an at-home kit to test for ketones in blood. While instructions may vary, your kit will include some kind of device for you to prick your finger. You will use this to collect a drop of blood for testing. Read the kit instructions carefully, and talk to your health care provider to make sure you collect and test your blood correctly. Your health care provider may order a ketones in urine test in addition to or instead of a ketones in blood test to check for diabetic ketoacidosis. He or she may also want to check your A1c levels and blood glucose levels to help monitor your diabetes. Will I need to do anything to prepare for the test? You don't need any special preparations for a ketones in blood test. There is very little risk to having a blood test. You may have slight pain or bruising at the spot where the needle was put in, but most symptoms go away quickly. A normal test result is negative. This means no ketones were found in your blood. If high blood ketone levels are found, it may mean you have diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). If you have DKA, your health care provider will provide or recommend treatment, which may involve going to the hospital. Other conditions can cause you to test positive for blood ketones. These include: Eating disorders , malnutrition , and other conditions where the body does not take in enough calories Pregnancy. Sometimes pregnant women will develop blood ketones. If high leve Continue reading >>

4: Fasting For Keto-adaptation, High Blood Ketones, Elevated And Low Blood Sugar, No Weight Loss, Slowing Fat Metabolism

4: Fasting For Keto-adaptation, High Blood Ketones, Elevated And Low Blood Sugar, No Weight Loss, Slowing Fat Metabolism

Veteran health podcaster, blogger, international speaker, and bestselling author Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” teams up with Toronto, Ontario Canada-based nephrologist Dr. Jason Fung from IntensiveDietaryManagement.com and Dr. Fung’s Clinical Director at his Intensive Dietary Management Program clinic Megan Ramos on this podcast dedicated to answering YOUR questions about intermittent, alternate day, and extended fasting. Jimmy and Dr. Fung are the coauthors of the 2016 international bestseller The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended Fasting and, along with Megan, are happy to provide this podcast as an additional resource for anyone curious about going on a fast to improve their health. We love hearing from our listeners with new questions–send an email to Jimmy at [email protected] And if you’re not already subscribed to the podcast on iTunes, then you can do that and leave a review HERE. Listen in today as Jimmy and Megan answer your questions about all things fasting in Episode 4. FREE N=1 TRACKING TOOL AT HEADS UP HEALTH – Whether you should fast when you are sick HOT TOPIC: Can you use fasting as a way to get keto-adapted faster? Can you get keto-adapted faster with fasting? And why do you get angry on the second day of fasting? What do you do about that? Mary KEY QUOTE: “We tell patients not to stop their fast on the third day because that’s usually the hardest, but once you are keto-adapted, you can fast for as many days as you want, usually without implication, so on the third day of my fast I don’t experience any third day hump.”- Megan Ramos 1. Can blood ketones go too high while you are fasting? Hey guys, I’m 71 years old with a low BMI and no medical or h Continue reading >>

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