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Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy

Urine Ketones - Meanings And False Positives

Urine Ketones - Meanings And False Positives

Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Urine Ketones article more useful, or one of our other health articles. Description Ketones are produced normally by the liver as part of fatty acid metabolism. In normal states these ketones will be completely metabolised so that very few, if any at all, will appear in the urine. If for any reason the body cannot get enough glucose for energy it will switch to using body fats, resulting in an increase in ketone production making them detectable in the blood and urine. How to test for ketones The urine test for ketones is performed using test strips available on prescription. Strips dedicated to ketone testing in the UK include[1]: GlucoRx KetoRx Sticks 2GK® Ketostix® Mission® Ketone Testing should be performed according to manufacturers' instructions. The sample should be fresh and uncontaminated. Usually the result will be expressed as negative or positive (graded 1 to 4)[2]. Ketonuria is different from ketonaemia (ie presence of ketones in the blood) and often ketonuria does not indicate clinically significant ketonaemia. Depending on the testing strips used, urine testing for ketones either has an excellent sensitivity with a low specificity, or a poor sensitivity with a good specificity. However, this should be viewed in the context of uncertainty of the biochemical level of significant ketosis[3]. Interpretation of results Normally only small amounts of ketones are excreted daily in the urine (3-15 mg). High or increased values may be found in: Poorly controlled diabetes. Starvation: Prolonged vomiting. Rapid weight loss. Frequent strenuous exercise. Poisoning (eg, with isop Continue reading >>

Protein In Urine: 4 Causes & Other Pregnancy-related Urinary Issues

Protein In Urine: 4 Causes & Other Pregnancy-related Urinary Issues

After a routine pregnancy check-up, your doctor tells you there’s protein in your urine. Your first instinct may be to panic, but there are many possible reasons why protein is showing up in your urine – and not all of them are dangerous. 4 Causes for Protein in Urine During Pregnancy It’s not uncommon to find small amounts of protein in your urine during pregnancy. But in some cases, protein is a sign of complications that require swift treatment. 1. Your Kidneys are Working Overtime Protein may just be an indication that your kidneys are working overtime now that you’re pregnant. If only small amounts of protein are found in your urine, this is the likely cause. And it’s no wonder your kidneys are tired – you’re running to the bathroom every five minutes. Frequent urination during pregnancy puts excess strain on your kidneys and may contribute to the protein found in your urine. 2. You May Have an Infection Protein may also be a sign of a minor infection. If your doctor or midwife suspects that an infection is the cause, a sample of your urine will be sent to the hospital to check for a UTI (urinary tract infection). If you do have a UTI, your doctor will prescribe antibiotics to clear the infection. Most rounds of antibiotics last three to seven days. Don’t worry – urinary tract infections are very common during pregnancy. But your doctor will monitor your condition closely to make sure the infection clears. During pregnancy, hormones change the urinary tract, which makes you more vulnerable to infection. Your growing uterus also puts more pressure on your bladder, which makes it difficult to empty it completely. Stagnant urine in the bladder is the most likely cause of the infection. If left untreated, a simple UTI can lead to a kidney infection. A Continue reading >>

Causes & Diet For Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy

Causes & Diet For Ketones In Urine During Pregnancy

Ketone bodies are formed as a result of metabolism of fatty acids. There are primarily three kinds produced by fatty acid metabolism, viz. acetone, aceto-acetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. These ketones are formed in the kidney and liver and are transported to other body tissues and converted to energy in the citric acid cycle.As such, nominal production of ketones is required for normal functioning of the body. However, when there is excessive production of ketone bodies, the latter gets accumulated in the blood and begins to appear in the urine. This condition is medically referred to as ketonuria. Yellow urine during pregnancy may become a cause for concern for many women. However it ... Even women who are suffering from diabetes can have a healthy pregnancy, with the help of ... Every month, an egg is released from the ovaries. If this egg is fertilized by sperm, it ... Pregnancy brings with it numerous changes in a woman’s body and these changes have ... Causes of Ketones formation in Urine (Ketonuria) Some of the causes of ketonuria are metabolic disorders like diabetes and renal glycosuria, abnormal dietary patterns like starving or fasting, low carbohydrate intake, anorexia, and prolonged vomiting. One of the other causes of ketonuria is enhanced rate of metabolism, which is predominantly seen during pregnancy, lactation, and even in hyperthyroidism.The impact of ketones in urine during pregnancy is still a matter of apprehension. Some researchers believe that high ketones in urine during pregnancy can cause lower IQ and lack of concentration and memory in the offspring, while others deny this. There is no definitive research to support this belief, and as such, it cannot be inferred that presence of ketones in urine during pregnancy can adversely affe Continue reading >>

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

The human body primarily runs on glucose. When your body is low on glucose, or if you have diabetes and don’t have enough insulin to help your cells absorb the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones (chemically known as ketone bodies) are byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids. The breakdown of fat for fuel and the creation of ketones is a normal process for everyone. In a person without diabetes, insulin, glucagon, and other hormones prevent ketone levels in the blood from getting too high. However, people with diabetes are at risk for ketone buildup in their blood. If left untreated, people with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While rare, it’s possible for people with type 2 diabetes to experience DKA in certain circumstances as well. If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. These include: If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress to: a fruity breath odor stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. Testing your blood or urine to measure your ketone levels can all be done at home. At-home testing kits are available for both types of tests, although urine testing continues to be more common. Urine tests are available without a prescription at most drugstores, or you can buy them online. You should test your urine or blood for ketones when any of the following occurs: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL. You feel sick or nauseated, regardless of your blood sugar reading. To perform a urine test, you urinate into a clean container and dip the test strip into the urine. For a child who isn’t potty-trained, a pa Continue reading >>

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Urine Tests During Pregnancy

Will my practitioner ask me for a urine sample at each prenatal visit? Practices vary a lot from office to office. Your practitioner will likely ask you for a urine sample at your first prenatal visit and send it to a lab for a complete urinalysis. Some practitioners will continue to ask for a urine sample at each visit (or once a trimester) and they will usually test it by dipstick right in the office. Others will not ask for a sample again unless you're having symptoms that would warrant a urine test. Some will give you specific instructions for how to produce a "clean-catch midstream specimen," while others will just ask you to pee a little bit into a cup. How do I produce a "clean-catch midstream specimen"? You're given a specimen cup and an antiseptic wipe and sent to the rest room to produce a urine sample. First, wash your hands. Then, with clean fingers, separate your labia and clean your vulva from front to back with the wipe. Urinate for a few seconds into the toilet and then slip the cup under the stream until you collect enough for the sample. (Avoid touching the inside of the cup with your fingers.) Then finish urinating into the toilet. Put the cap on the cup and deliver it to the medical assistant. How is the dipstick testing done? A medical assistant checks your urine by dipping a colored test stick in it and comparing the results to a chart. The results are written on your medical chart for your midwife or doctor to review. What is my urine tested for? Sugar It's normal to occasionally have a small amount of sugar in your urine during pregnancy, but if you have elevated levels at a couple of prenatal visits in a row or a very high level at one visit, it could mean you have gestational diabetes. Your practitioner may have you take a glucose challenge tes Continue reading >>

Ketonuria

Ketonuria

Ketonuria is a medical condition in which ketone bodies are present in the urine. It is seen in conditions in which the body produces excess ketones as an indication that it is using an alternative source of energy. It is seen during starvation or more commonly in type I diabetes mellitus. Production of ketone bodies is a normal response to a shortage of glucose, meant to provide an alternate source of fuel from fatty acids. Pathophysiology[edit] Ketones are metabolic end-products of fatty acid metabolism. In healthy individuals, ketones are formed in the liver and are completely metabolized so that only negligible amounts appear in the urine. However, when carbohydrates are unavailable or unable to be used as an energy source, fat becomes the predominant body fuel instead of carbohydrates and excessive amounts of ketones are formed as a metabolic byproduct. Higher levels of ketones in the urine indicate that the body is using fat as the major source of energy. Ketone bodies that commonly appear in the urine when fats are burned for energy are acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Acetone is also produced and is expired by the lungs.[1] Normally, the urine should not contain a noticeable concentration of ketones to give a positive reading. As with tests for glucose, acetoacetate can be tested by a dipstick or by a lab. The results are reported as small, moderate, or large amounts of acetoacetate. A small amount of acetoacetate is a value under 20 mg/dl; a moderate amount is a value of 30–40 mg/dl, and a finding of 80 mg/dl or greater is reported as a large amount. One 2010 study admits that though ketonuria's relation to general metabolic health is ill-understood, there is a positive relationship between the presence of ketonuria after fasting and positive metabo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

Gestational Diabetes: Once You’re Diagnosed

If you’re a pregnant woman, probably one of the last things you want to hear is that you have gestational diabetes. Your thoughts might range from, “What did I do to cause this?” to “Will my baby be OK?” First, keep in mind that it’s perfectly normal to feel scared and worried. Second, while gestational diabetes (GDM) is indeed serious, remember that, with proper management, you can have a healthy baby. Once you’re diagnosed If you find out that you have GDM, be prepared to learn a lot about diabetes! You’ll likely be referred to a diabetes educator and/or a dietitian. You might also be referred to an endocrinologist, a doctor who specializes in diabetes and other endocrine disorders. In most cases, you’ll be seen by a member of your health-care team about every two weeks. Be prepared to start checking your blood glucose with a meter, following a meal plan, checking your urine for ketones, recording your food and glucose levels, and possibly starting on insulin. In other words, be prepared to do some homework! Your team is there to support you and make sure that you receive the right treatment. Treating GDM There are a number of ways in which GDM is treated, and they all work together to help ensure that your blood glucose levels stay in a safe range throughout your pregnancy. Remember that the goal is to keep your blood glucose in a normal range; this is because, when blood glucose levels are too high, the extra glucose crosses the placenta to the baby. Too much glucose can cause your baby to be too large, and may cause other complications for both you and your baby during delivery and later on (such as Type 2 diabetes). Nutrition and meal planning. The saying that “you’re eating for two” during your pregnancy is partly correct. You ARE eating f Continue reading >>

Urinalysis - Testing The Urine During Pregnancy

Urinalysis - Testing The Urine During Pregnancy

One of the tests done routinely ate each prenatal visit is the urine test or urinalysis which checks mostly for sugar, protein, blood, and leucocytes. The very first thing you think about when you hear the words "urine test" in pregnancy is a pregnancy test, to check for the presence of hCG the pregnancy hormone in the urine. But once your pregnancy has been diagnosed, the words "urine test" take on a whole different meaning. During each prenatal visit you are usually asked to urinate and collect a small sample of clean, midstream urine in a sterile plastic cup and the urine is then checked for the presence of certain indicators for different problems. Chemically prepared testing strips are dipped into your sample of urine to screen for certain indicators. More in-depth analysis may be done by having your urine sample assessed by a laboratory. This urine test or urinalysis test checks for for high levels of sugars, proteins, ketones, white blood cells, and bacteria for: bladder or kidney infections, diabetes, dehydration preeclampsia Protein Higher levels of protein may suggest a possible urinary tract infection, or kidney disease. Preeclampsia may be a concern if higher levels of protein are found later in pregnancy, combined with high blood pressure. Protein found in your urine indicates a problem in kidney function such as an infection. If protein is found in your urine late in pregnancy this may be a sign of preeclampsia. Sugar High levels of sugar in your urine do not necessarily mean you are diabetic. During pregnancy it is normal for your kidneys to leak some sugar from your bloodstream into your urine, especially when you ate or dranksomething sweet. Ketones Ketones occur when your body is breaking down fats instead of carbohydrates for energy. High levels of ke Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies In Urine During Pregnancy, Norma Ketones For Pregnant

Ketone Bodies In Urine During Pregnancy, Norma Ketones For Pregnant

The human body has a very complex structure inside it every second makes a lot of biochemical processes that provide it with the necessary energy and maintain normal life. So arranged by nature that the main source of energy in human body is the breakdown of carbohydrate molecules that enter the body with food. If for one reason or another, is insufficient supply of glucose, the cells begin to actively burn fat. A byproduct of this biochemical process become ketone bodies, which come in the urine, where they can be easily determine by taking the analysis to the study. Ketone bodies in urine during pregnancy can indicate the beginning of a number of pathological processes or be the result of a complex hormonal and physiological adjustment taking place in their body. In any case, even a single episode of the appearance of ketones in the urinary sediment (ketonwrïya), requires the doctor’s further assessment of the pregnant woman and to closely monitor her. The reasons of occurrence of ketone bodies in the urine The appearance in the urine component such as ketone bodies, is not always indicative of disease, because the cause of this can be directly linked to improper diet in women. We are talking primarily about the common acceptance of high-protein food with a sharp restriction of carbohydrate intake. In this version of the diet, the body goes to the breakdown of fatty tissue. Also cause physiological ketonuria are expressed by physical exertion or strong emotional stress, hormonal changes in the body of pregnant women. As a rule, the appearance of ketones in such cases can be single and, with repeated testing of urine, no pathological changes are detected. Pathological ketonwrïya indicates the beginning or the progression of one of the following diseases: the debut Continue reading >>

Ketones In Urine (28 Weeks Pregnant)

Ketones In Urine (28 Weeks Pregnant)

I'm a healthy 27 year old pregnant woman. Everything has been going very well during my pregnancy so far. My only big concern is that my doctor found ketones in my urine and asked me wheather I'm eating well. I've been eating better then ever (6 small meals during the day) with the occasional sweet treat. I have gained 8kg so far. Seeing that I'm 7 months pregant, I don't think that is too bad. My dr. looked concerned but did'nt say much. I am not diabetic but do have low bloodsugar. I do feel shakey during the day if I don't eat every now and then. Should I take matters more serious and how will this affect my baby? GynaeDoc Anyone who doesn't eat for several hours will have ketones in the urine. It may have been an isolated episode. Repeat the test after you have eaten a meal. Best wishes The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content. What can urine test results reveal? Sugar: Sugar in your urine does not mean you are diabetic. It is normal for your kidneys to leak sugar from your bloodstream into your urine. This is particularly expected if you eat a large meal or drink a really sweet beverage. You should be tested for gestational diabetes if: Consistent levels of sugar (glucose) are detected and/or You feel tired or lethargic You are consistently thirsty You are loosing weight Protein: Protein found in your urine indicates a problem in kidney function such as an infection. If protein is found in your urine late in pregnancy this may be a sign of Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

Ketones are an acid remaining when the body burns its own fat. When the body has insufficient insulin (or cannot use sufficient insulin), it cannot get glucose (sugar) from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy and will instead begin to burn fat stores. When the body is burning too much fat, it may cause ketones to become present as by product shown in your urine. Burning fat instead of glucose can lead to a condition called ketosis. It can make you feel poorly, with lack of energy. If you have healthy or low BMI it can also be dangerous as you may also lose too much weight. Testing for ketones Your urine is usually tested for ketones during your diabetes clinic appointments. You may also be tested for ketones if you have been taken into hospital with high blood sugar levels. Ketones are detected by testing the urine with a dip stick. They are measured on a scale with 0 being lowest and 4++ being the highest. The test sticks can be purchased from a pharmacy or online and in some cases you may be prescribed test strips for home testing for if you get blood sugar levels over a certain level. Your diabetes midwife will usually complete ketone tests when you attend clinic appointments, so it is not necessary to purchase dip sticks for home use unless you're advised to by a medical professional. Blood ketones can also be tested and are much more accurate than the urine dip sticks. Type 1 diabetics may be given ketone blood testing monitors. Why are ketones common in ladies diagnosed with gestational diabetes? Ketones can be detected when you have not eaten for a long period of time and may be found in samples taken in the morning due to fasting overnight. It is common for mothers with gestational diabetes to develop ketones due to limiting too many carbohydrates f Continue reading >>

Norm Of Ketone Bodies During Pregnancy

Norm Of Ketone Bodies During Pregnancy

Ketone bodies during pregnancy are another analysis that must be passed on to a future mother. Ketone bodies are in the urine, and allow you to determine how the pregnancy is, whether there is an infection in the body or everything is in order. Any woman will be useful to know why during pregnancy, so often pass urine tests, and that it can be learned. Let's consider what ketone bodies are, how they affect pregnancy, and what is their norm in the urine of a pregnant woman. Ketone bodies during pregnancy should be kept in small amounts in the urine. As a rule, the allocation of ketoids in knocks from 20 to 50 mg. In the general analysis of urine, these indicators are almost not perceptible. Therefore, every pregnant woman should take special tests to determine this indicator. The increased value of ketone bodies in urine is considered pathology, that is ketonuria. Ketone bodies during pregnancy are manifested in the event that in the female body there is an infection also, they can talk about early toxicosis. Ketone bodies poison the body of a pregnant woman with acetone, this complicates the process of bearing a baby. Jumps ketone bodies can be observed with a sharp decrease in the weight of the pregnant woman, but this is observed in the first months of pregnancy, during the period of toxicosis. Sometimes ketone bodies indicate that the pregnant woman has problems with the liver, as well as with the digestive system because of an incorrect, unbalanced diet. Continue reading >>

Ketones In Urine

Ketones In Urine

I know this is an old post, but people may still be checking for answers. I work in a laboratory where we do urinalysis constantly all day every day. In a pregnant woman, you can see ketones in the urine in two, but separate, circumstances. First is ketones in combination with any urine glucose (sugar) level. This may be a sign of gestational diabetes and you should start asking your doctor questions about it. Second is ketones by themselves. I'm 12 weeks pregnant and had ketones in my urine and was instructed by my doctor to go to the ER and get IV fluids. This was directly related to my eating habits, which at that point were near null because of the morning sickness. Because I was eating so little, and barely able to keep water down, my body was using my fat stores to supply nutrients to the baby. This breakdown of fat in such large amounts causes ketones as a waste product, which is then excreted through your urine. Ketones occur in the absence of carbs, when your body starts to use fat for calories. You will see ketones when you are eating very low calorie, very low carb, or have impaired insulin function. Ketones are concentrated in a state of dehydration. Excess glucose in urine indicates eating too many carbs (if you're diabetic) and/or impaired insulin function. Both are hallmarked by sweet smelling urine. Make sure you eat small meals during the day and add a night time snack, with a protein, to prevent ketosis while sleeping. If you think you have diabetes see a physician. I am 38 weeks pregnant and my urin showed high ketones this week. My blood sugar was in "acceptable" level; however, my doctor said that the presence of ketones in my urine means I need to drink alot more water because my body is converting carbs to sugar faster than I can exp Continue reading >>

Dehydration During Pregnancy

Dehydration During Pregnancy

What is dehydration? Dehydration is an insufficient amount of water in the body. Either insufficient drinking or excessive water loss from the body can lead to dehydration. Is dehydration in pregnancy a serious condition? Dehydration can be a mild nuisance or a life-threatening condition for both the mother and the baby. What are common causes of dehydration in pregnancy? A pregnant woman can become dehydrated from the same reasons as anyone other. Main causes include: Insufficient drinking Excessive sweating, mainly due to high ambient temperature Excessive urination Severe or prolonged diarrhea Severe or repeated vomiting Prolonged hyperventilation, for example due to anxiety and associated chronic hyperventilation syndrome. Morning Sickness Morning sickness can prevent a woman to eat and drink enough. In severe morning sickness called hyperemesis gravidarum, a woman can additionally lose a lot of fluid by repeated vomiting and is therefore at high risk for severe dehydration that requires admission to hospital and intravenous fluid replacement. Symptoms and Signs of Dehydration in Pregnancy MILD DEHYDRATION Symptoms: Thirst (not always), slight anxiety, slightly decreased frequency of urination Signs: Slightly increased heart rate. MODERATE DEHYDRATION Symptoms: Severe thirst (not always), dry mouth, decreased frequency of urination, dark yellow or tea-colored urine, tiredness, dizziness, headache, nausea, constipation. Signs: Increased heart rate, prolonged skin recoil after pinch and release (up to 2 seconds). SEVERE DEHYDRATION Nausea and vomiting, usually in the first trimester (but sometimes even in the third trimester), are the main causes of severe dehydration in pregnancy. Possible symptoms: Extreme thirst, but the woman may feel no thirst due to nausea Dry m Continue reading >>

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

Ketones In Gestational Diabetes

As part of your gestational diabetes management, your doctor may ask you to test for ketones in your morning urine. If you have gestational diabetes, you should know about insulin, glucose, and ketones. When you eat, your body breaks down foods into usable sources of energy. Glucose is the sugar that results. Your body needs glucose for energy and your baby needs it to grow. In order to get glucose out of your blood and into your cells, insulin is required. Insulin is a hormone that you produce in your pancreas. "In gestational diabetes, hormones produced during pregnancy can interfere with insulin and make it hard to use glucose. If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to overcome the effects of the hormones, the blood sugar will rise," explains Louise McDonald, RN, clinical manager of maternity and pediatrics at Cleveland Clinic Home Care. "The body cannot use sugar without enough insulin. That causes the body to break down fats as a source of energy. Ketones are the waste products that are left over when the body burns some of its own fat for fuel. The ketones pass from the bloodstream into the urine," says McDonald. Why Are Ketones Important in Gestational Diabetes? The treatment of gestational diabetes is aimed at keeping your blood sugar under control. This is done with a combination of diet, exercise, and sometimes insulin treatment. Finding ketones in your urine is a warning sign that your blood sugar control is out of balance. High blood sugar. If you are taking in more sugar in your diet than your insulin can manage, your blood sugar goes up. This is dangerous for you and your baby. If your baby is exposed to more sugar then the baby needs, the baby will grow too fast. This condition, called macrosomia, can lead to problems during delivery. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

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