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Ketones In The Urine Kidney Failure

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In this lesson, you'll learn how afferent and efferent arteriole resistance affects: 1) Renal plasma flow 2) GFR 3) Glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure

Ketone Bodies Increase Glomerular Filtration Rate In Normal Man And In Patients With Type 1 (insulin-dependent) Diabetes Mellitus

Summary The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the administration of acetoacetic and hydrochloric acids in a group of control and Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients influenced renal haemodynamics. Renal plasma flow increased from 657±88 to 762±81 ml·min−1. 1.73 m−2 in diabetic patients (p<0.01) and from 590±71 to 691±135 in control subjects (p<0.01). Glomerular filtration rate increased from 135±9 to 180±8 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2 in diabetic patients (p< 0.001) and from 117±8 to 145±7 in control subjects (p<0.01). Similar effects on renal haemodynamics, even if less pronounced, were observed with low dose acetoacetic but not with hydrochloric acid infusion. Total protein, β2-microglobulin but not albumin excretion rates were increased by acetoacetic acid. We conclude that an acute increase in blood concentration of ketone bodies within the range found in diabetic patients with poor metabolic control (1) increases renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate both in control subjects and diabetic patients and (2) causes a tubular proteinuria. Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. driven1

    OK.... I'm a keto newbie, on Day 9 of the 12 day start up. As and aside, I feel great and am loving the food choices.
    ANYWAY... I have a girl friend who is an RN (and a very good one), who has cautioned me that ketones are 'hard on the kidneys'.
    Now, I love my GF to death, and I know that she means only the best, but I have very little confidence in the conventional medical community. After all, this is an industry that makes it's money from people being sick...
    My research has turned up that ketones are NOT damaging to the kidneys. On the contrary, the kidney uses ketones as a preferred fuel source when they can get them. The heart and brain as well as other major organs prefer them too...
    Seems as though the confusion is with the fact that a lot of medical professionals consider the excessive protein while on a keto diet damaging to the kidneys. I have also found research that dispels this... showing that only individuals who already have compromised kidney functions MIGHT have a problem with excess protein in the diet.
    I'm looking for comments from those who are experienced with the keto lifestyle. What do you know??

  2. titebuoy

    excessive dietary protein causes your kidneys to work harder to remove excess nitrogen. however, the keto is a high fat diet, not a high protein diet so i wouldnt be worried about it unless your macros are out of wack. some people have trouble with foamy urine on the diet, but most people dont experience kidney trouble on keto.

  3. stew9812

    I'm new to this too.
    I think what they teach the doctors/nurses is whats best for the general public. (people that don't work out, and don't necessarily get enough water ect..) So they may not always have the best answers for people like us.
    I would say to just drink plenty of water, and you will be fine.
    Just my opinion here, but like you say there is plenty of people who have done this diet with no bad side effects, and there is plenty of research supporting this to be a healthy diet as well.
    just my .02

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Dr. Christopher Cannon discusses using JARDIANCE to Reduce Cardiovascular Death Risks in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Guest Bio: Dr. Christopher Paul Cannon is a cardiovascular medicine specialist at Brigham and Womens Hospital (BWH) and a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Dr. Cannon is the executive director of cardiometabolic trials at the Harvard Clinical Research Institute. Dr. Cannon earned his medical degree from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. He completed an internal medicine residency at New York-Presbyterian Hospital and a cardiology fellowship at BWH. Dr. Cannon is board certified in internal medicine. Segment overview: Dr. Christopher Cannon, discusses JARDIANCE, a treatment that can help reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adults with type 2 diabetes and known cardiovascular disease. For more information about this interview, visit this link: http://healthprofessionalradio.com.au...

Jardiance® (empagliflozin) Significantly Reduced The Risk Of Progressive Kidney Disease In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes With Established Cardiovascular Disease

(empagliflozin) reduced the risk for new-onset or worsening kidney disease by 39 percent versus placebo when added to standard of care in adults with type 2 diabetes with established cardiovascular disease. Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) announced today that the findings have been published in The New England Journal of Medicine and also presented at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 76th Scientific Sessions® in New Orleans. “These findings are clinically important, given that more than a third of people with type 2 diabetes will develop kidney disease, which can lead to kidney failure and eventually the need for dialysis. In the United States, the cost to treat chronic kidney disease is estimated to exceed $48 billion annually,” said Christoph Wanner, M.D., chief of the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at the University Hospital of Würzburg, Germany. “Since diabetes is the number one cause of kidney failure in the U.S., novel treatments that may have the potential to help address this crucial medical need are necessary.” These findings were part of a pre-specified exploratory analysis plan of additional endpoints of the landmark E Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. driven1

    OK.... I'm a keto newbie, on Day 9 of the 12 day start up. As and aside, I feel great and am loving the food choices.
    ANYWAY... I have a girl friend who is an RN (and a very good one), who has cautioned me that ketones are 'hard on the kidneys'.
    Now, I love my GF to death, and I know that she means only the best, but I have very little confidence in the conventional medical community. After all, this is an industry that makes it's money from people being sick...
    My research has turned up that ketones are NOT damaging to the kidneys. On the contrary, the kidney uses ketones as a preferred fuel source when they can get them. The heart and brain as well as other major organs prefer them too...
    Seems as though the confusion is with the fact that a lot of medical professionals consider the excessive protein while on a keto diet damaging to the kidneys. I have also found research that dispels this... showing that only individuals who already have compromised kidney functions MIGHT have a problem with excess protein in the diet.
    I'm looking for comments from those who are experienced with the keto lifestyle. What do you know??

  2. titebuoy

    excessive dietary protein causes your kidneys to work harder to remove excess nitrogen. however, the keto is a high fat diet, not a high protein diet so i wouldnt be worried about it unless your macros are out of wack. some people have trouble with foamy urine on the diet, but most people dont experience kidney trouble on keto.

  3. stew9812

    I'm new to this too.
    I think what they teach the doctors/nurses is whats best for the general public. (people that don't work out, and don't necessarily get enough water ect..) So they may not always have the best answers for people like us.
    I would say to just drink plenty of water, and you will be fine.
    Just my opinion here, but like you say there is plenty of people who have done this diet with no bad side effects, and there is plenty of research supporting this to be a healthy diet as well.
    just my .02

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Full description and additional information at http://medtwice.com/what-is-abnormal-... Free medical videos at http://www.MedTwice.com

Abnormal Contents Of Urine

Normally, urine contains water and wastes, such as urea, uric acid, creatinine, and some ions. However, some of these substances may be abnormally elevated, which usually indicates that something is wrong with the body. The following are some of the abnormal constituents of urine and some possible causes. Albumin Albumin is a type of protein, which is a normal component of plasma—the fluid component of blood. When albumin is found to be excessive in the urine, it may indicate that the tiny filtering units in the kidney, called nephrons, are damaged or destroyed. Elevated albumin in the urine is termed albuminuria. Bilrubin Bilirubin, when modified by the kidneys, contributes to the classical yellow color of urine. It is a byproduct that results from the breakdown of hemoglobin—the red pigment in red blood cells. When levels of bilirubin in urine is above normal, the condition is called bilirubinuria. This may indicate liver disease or obstructive biliary disease. Glucose The presence of glucose or blood sugar in urine is called glucosuria. It may indicate that the person has diabetes. Ketone bodies The presence of ketone bodies in the urine may indicate diabetes or anorexia. It Continue reading >>

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  1. bbearsmama

    Ketones found in urine-is our diet bad for our kidneys?

    Hi there-
    I went to see my PCP for a urinary tract infection today and she said there was a lot of stuff in my urine-ketones, blood (which is always there-which is why I also see a nephrologist), and some protein. She thinks the ketones are because of my high protein diet and she told me to try to eat a more balanced diet (more carbs, fruits, veggies). How is this possible with such a tiny pouch? Has this happened to anyone else and if so-what did you do? Is it dangerous to have ketones in your urine? I do worry about my kidney function. My nephrologist likes to do labwork (blood/urine) every 6 months to keep an eye on things. He doesn't think my labs have warranted doing a kidney biopsy at this point. The last time I saw the nephrologist was before my RNY. I just don't want my diet to be damaging to my kidneys.
    Has this happened to anyone--kidney damage as a result of the post-op diet? I know that it will be easier to eat a more balanced diet as a I get further out, right?
    Thank you all for your advice and help!
    Sincerely,
    Pam

  2. RainbowRN

    I know that when the atkins diet was really popular, more people started talking about ketones in the urine. The big deal about it is that protein molecules are actually really big and more difficult for the kidneys to filter. Therefore the kidneys can be damaged overtime. Now, I'm not sure about how long it takes or how much protein it would take to do that. All I know is that, last year before I even considered WLS, my NUT put me on a protein sparing modified fast. It was a diet that was primarily protein only. It was very high amounts of protein. Greater than 140mg a day. I was told that I would do the diet for 3 months and then I had to go off of it for 3 months and then back on for three months simply because of the risk of damage to my kidneys. I don't consume that much protein since surgery. I try to make sure I get in 60mg a day. I would be curious to find out if kidney damage is a possibilty for us. In all my research I have not heard of that being a side effect.

  3. bbearsmama

    Before I had my surgery, I did talk to my nephrologist about the high protein diet and he thought it would be fine. He said that 60 g. of protein is really not that much. What is considered the "normal" intake of protein (for people who haven't had wls)? I think it's around 50 g. of protein. I'm not sure, though. And the reality is-I struggle to get 60 g. in per day. Most days I don't even get there-it's more like 50 or 55 g.
    That is interesting about the protein molecules being big.
    Thank you so much for your reply!
    Pam :)

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