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Ketones In Breast Milk

Breastfeeding And Banting: Is It Safe To Eat A Lchf Diet?

Breastfeeding And Banting: Is It Safe To Eat A Lchf Diet?

Breastfeeding and Banting: Is it safe to eat a LCHF diet? On this episode of The Ask Prof Noakes Podcast we address two concerns surrounding breastfeeding. Prof. Tim Noakes chats about what you should be eating for the benefit of the baby and how much of it you should be eating. Today we have got two separate questions but it is on the same topic. The first one was submitted by Kim and she wanted to know is it safe to be on a low carb high fat diet or the Banting diet and be breastfeeding. She wants to know, are ketones harmful to her baby’s health and will it affect her milk supply? The second question came from Christa and she wants to know is there special things you can do when breastfeeding, she said that her daughter has started follow the LCHF diet recently but she is feeling faint an hungry and the baby is still quite small, only eight weeks old? Prof Tim Noakes: Let us get to Kim’s question. Firstly, if babies were not able to metabolise ketones, they would all be dead because they would all die within a few hours of being born and before they are fed, so the ketone response is critical to our survival. Can infants metabolise ketones? Infants, when they are born, are ketotic and they burn ketones until they start getting fed which takes some hours as you can imagine so the fact that you might give the child a little bit of ketones in the breast milk is really unimportant. Ketones are one of the best foods there is, one of the best foods for the brain and for the muscles that there is. She need not worry about that. If her milk supply is struggling because she is on the Banting diet and she knows it absolutely is the case, then she needs to address that question, perhaps eat a bit more carbohydrate but that is not a common complaint. Many people will normall Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Cancer Breakthrough Or Madness?

The Ketogenic Diet: Cancer Breakthrough Or Madness?

There has been a lot of buzz recently regarding ketones. As a cancer physician and researcher, I spend a lot of time thinking about ketones throughout the day. But what exactly is a ketone, you may be asking... Ketones are the energy supply our body makes to feed the brain during times of starvation, carbohydrate deprivation, fasting, or even just after a night’s rest. Our cells require a constant amount of oxygen and an energy source for survival. Sugar within the blood can provide a small amount of energy, as can proteins and fats. But when sugar is not around, the body turns to ketone production to feed the brain and other organs and cells. Through fasting and cutting carbohydrates, one can raise the amount of ketones feeding his or her brain and floating around in the body. Not only is this a clinically proven and superior method of weight loss,1–4 but it also has promise as a method of cancer treatment, or at least working together with current cancer treatments.5–8 You see, when ketone production in the body is high, your sugar levels drop, which is important, as cancer cells use sugar for energy.9 There is also a handful of data showing that cancer cells may not be able to use ketones for energy, while normal cells can.10 As an oncologist, when I heard that ketones may selectively starve cancer cells, I was excited and began aggressively researching it. However, with all the chatter on the internet of the dangers of ketones, I have been wondering if all my work regarding the ketogenic diet is putting people in harm’s way as opposed to helping them. I recently got my answer while I was stuck on an airplane. I was seated next to someone who was engaging in a ketogenic diet consisting of pure liquid. His diet was almost 60% fat, mostly in order to produce ke Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: Nursing And The Primal Eating Plan

Dear Mark: Nursing And The Primal Eating Plan

104 Comments I’ve received the question numerous times, and last month several readers raised the issue in my “Ask Me Anything” post. For all the innumerable benefits of the Primal Blueprint diet, there are a handful of situations that oblige a few modest accommodations. In the past I’ve suggested Primally-minded adaptations for endurance athletes. Today I’ll take up the question of nursing. Do the long-term, intensive demands of breastfeeding require modification of the typical Primal diet? What special considerations are there for nursing mothers? And what about specific scenarios readers have mentioned: ketones, reflux, ammonia-scented urine? There’s a lot of Primal ground to cover today, so let’s jump right in. But first a reminder that I’m not a doctor and that everything on this site should be viewed as my opinion and not medical advice. First, a little background. Nature made the nursing process extremely efficient, which is great for baby and potentially not so great for the mother. The body not only prioritizes nutrient intake for breastmilk but in fact scavenges the mother’s stores, leaching calcium from the mother’s bones, for instance. Even under starvation conditions, the body still produces breastmilk with a remarkably nutrient dense profile. As comforting and ingenious as this phenomenon might be, it’s important for mothers to nourish their own health and wellbeing during these months. Although a shortchanged day here and there won’t do much, over time deficiencies can develop – especially if you’re practicing extended breastfeeding. As a result, research suggests that breastmilk displays a remarkably stable nutrient profile regardless of the mother’s food intake. Nonetheless, some nutrient levels are more dependent upon diet Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Follow The Banting Diet While Breastfeeding?

Is It Safe To Follow The Banting Diet While Breastfeeding?

Not all moms bounce back to their pre-baby body. If you’re considering the banting diet made popular by professor Tim Noakes in his book The Real Meal Revolution, read on before embarking on this journey, especially if you are breastfeeding. Q: I’m following the Banting diet and am breastfeeding my baby. Can it affect my baby negatively in any way since I’m not consuming carbs? I’m also curious if any other diets could affect breastfeeding babies, for example mothers who are vegans or don’t consume dairy? Nutritional therapist Hannah Kaye answers: Unless you are avoiding all fruit, vegetables and grains, you are, in effect, still eating carbohydrates. A cup of broccoli contains roughly 6g of carbs and a cup of cauliflower contains roughly 5g. For that reason, following Banting does not mean you are carb free. It only means that you are grain free (and legume free). However, there are potentially two issues when following a low-carb diet while breastfeeding. The first is related to entering a state of ketosis. This is when the body does not have enough glucose for energy. Stored fats are then broken down for energy, resulting in a build up of ketones (produced when the body burns fat fuel) within the body. There is not enough research to say whether the ketones that are excreted into the blood and urine are also present in breast milk and, if so, at what levels these would pose a danger to the breastfed baby. The second issue is related to rapid weight loss, which is more than 0.5kg per week while breastfeeding. Gradual weight loss has not been found to affect the mother’s milk supply or the baby’s health, but rapid loss has been linked to a decrease in milk supply. Additionally, toxins are stored in body fat. Rapid weight loss increases the release of thes Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding On A Ketogenic Diet

Breastfeeding On A Ketogenic Diet

Breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet: my personal experience Having a baby is one of the most exciting and nerve wracking times in your life, one great big cocktail of emotions. With nine months to prepare, trying to absorb as much information as possible can make you panic rather than put your mind at ease. There’s an abundance of general information on the internet but a lot of this is conflicting and very confusing! I’ll seek to answer the question I know you’ll all be wondering. Breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet: Is it safe? I began my ketogenic journey during pregnancy in preparation for our daughter being born. Searching the internet for information on the ketogenic lifestyle and new mothers, I found the information on breastfeeding on a ketogenic diet was limited and very conflicting. Every mother wants to do what’s best for their child – I desperately wanted to give myself the best chance of breastfeeding our daughter as possible. My ultimate concern was that the keto lifestyle may prevent my ability to do this. I wanted to share my story with you in the hope that it may provide some of that missing resource that i was desperately seeking when my journey first began. The darkness After 12 weeks of being fully keto adapted, I was feeding my baby one afternoon and noticed that she was becoming very frustrated. She had only been feeding for a short while and began pulling at my boob, becoming very restless. Whilst looking for the cause of her frustration, to my horror I realised that my milk had completely dried up! I was immediately overwhelmed with blind panic. A moment of weakness, fuelled by sheer panic and a lack of sleep, resulted in me finding an excuse to get my hands on the forbidden foods – refined carbs and sugar! The cravings part of my brain h Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding On A Low-carb Diet – Is It Dangerous?

Breastfeeding On A Low-carb Diet – Is It Dangerous?

Is it dangerous to breastfeed while on a low-carb, high-fat diet? Recently, the journal of the Swedish Medical Association published a case report (summary in English) of a woman who, six weeks after giving birth, had to be hospitalized for severe ketoacidosis. Luckily, she recovered quickly and her numbers were back to normal the next day. Ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition, most often seen in type 1 diabetics with acute insulin deficiency. In rare cases, ketoacidosis may occur in non-diabetics after prolonged periods of starvation or inadequate food intake, in which case it typically occurs in combination with stress or other medical conditions. The woman in this case had been eating low-carb, high fat for a long time before the incident. After giving birth however, she had suffered flu-like symptoms of fever, nausea and a complete loss of appetite. Despite this, she was still able to breastfeed her baby, which of course ramped up her nutritional requirements. The case study report brings up the woman’s low-carbohydrate diet as one possible contributing factor to the situation. However, as soon as the media found out, they immediately exaggerated this possible contributing factor to the guaranteed sole cause of the condition (which, as we shall see, is unikely): Metro: Woman Falls Seriously Ill of LCHF Diet During Lactation (Google translated from Swedish) In the woman’s own words The woman described in the case report in the journal contacted me of her own accord through common acquaintances. She tells a different story from the one perpetuated by the media: What isn’t made clear is that I, the breastfeeding woman, had been eating LCHF for approximately six years before this incident, but, because of stress during my second pregnancy and after childbirth I s Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Raspberry Ketones While You Are Breastfeeding?

Is It Safe To Take Raspberry Ketones While You Are Breastfeeding?

Are you a new mom and breastfeeding your little one? Have you heard of various herbal remedies or supplements that let you lose weight naturally, without any apparent side effects? Are you thinking of trying something, in particular, like raspberry ketone? If you would like to know more about the use of raspberry ketone and whether it is safe to consume while lactating, scroll down to know more. What Is Raspberry Ketone? Raspberry ketone is the name for the chemical form of the red raspberry. In its most prominent use, raspberry ketone is a weight loss supplement, and it helps improve metabolism. While it is mainly used due to its weight loss properties, there is no scientific data to back the claim. [ Read: Is It Safe To Drink Herbal Tea While Breastfeeding ] While you are breastfeeding, it is important to ensure that whatever you eat or drink is safe for both you and your baby. There are no direct health risks of the use of raspberry ketones while breastfeeding. However, there are no proven health benefits of taking raspberry ketone for nursing moms, which means there is no scientific research to back the same. It is advisable that while you are breastfeeding, you stay away from using any forms of raspberry ketone (1). [ Read: Benefits Of Drinking Chamomile Tea While Breastfeeding ] Important Warning To Remember: If you do plan to use any form of raspberry ketone while breastfeeding, make sure you speak to your doctor about it first. Also, here are a few warning signs you should consider before you consider using the same: Raspberry ketone has never been tested on humans to date. Any good effect of the same that you hear, like natural weight loss, or improved metabolism or burn fat does not have any scientific proof to back it. The USFDA has not evaluated any products Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding A Baby With Type 1 Diabetes.

Breastfeeding A Baby With Type 1 Diabetes.

This was sent to me by Caoimhe who is mum to Lorcan who has type 1 diabetes . The support and information for parents and professionals about breastfeeding a baby who has diabetes is very poor as you will see in the piece below . Lorcan has just weaned in the last few weeks at the grand age of 2 years and 4 months. This is due to his wonderful mums determination to listen to her gut instinct . Breastfeeding is the norm for babies , mothers should not have to defend it. Breastfeeding a baby or infant with type 1 diabetes is not an issue....or at least it shouldn't be. But in my experience, the issue is lack of knowledge about and experience of breastfeeding from hospital staff (consultants, doctors and dieticians). Lorcan was 13 months old and breastfed when he was diagnosed. There is a history of type 1 diabetes in my family so it was just bad luck on his part that he got it. Apparently people who get type 1 are born with a defective 6th chromosome (according to new genetics research that was published in Time magazine recently). Initially the fact that Lorcan was breastfed wasn't an issue. The priority once he was admitted to the childrens hospital was to stabilise him. His blood sugar level was very high and he had ketones in his blood - meaning that because his pancreas wasn't producing insulin and converting the sugar to energy, his body had started to convert fat to energy. The ketone smell of his breath was what caused alarm bells to ring for me - as soon as I got it I just knew he had diabetes. We were in A and E for around 10 hours, with Lorcan hooked up to various drips and subjected to serveral examinations and tests. I lost count of the number of different hospital staff who saw him during that time but the one abiding memory I have is that every time someone Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding & No Carb Diets

Breastfeeding & No Carb Diets

Video of the Day Cutting carbs or calories suddenly can cause your milk supply to dwindle, leaving you struggling to make enough breast milk for your baby's needs. Some moderately low-carb diets have multiple phases, so you might be able to skip the ultra-restrictive early phases and try a diet that gives you some healthy carbs and enough calories to maintain milk production. Aim for slow weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds a week and avoid dieting at all until around eight weeks after your baby's birth. At this point, your milk supply is fully established, so dieting won't derail that process. When you embark on a drastic diet, your body's fat stores may release stored toxins that could get into your breast milk. If your diet restricts carbs, you could also be missing out on vital nutrients that your body needs to support your own and your baby's health. Women on an extremely carb-restricted diet often begin to produce types of chemicals called ketones, and it is unknown whether ketones can get into breast milk or whether they are a danger to a nursing baby. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding

Low Carb Diets And Breastfeeding

High protein, low carbohydrate diets like the Atkins diet and the South Beach diet are very popular. These diets can be helpful for diabetics and people with gluten intolerance. In these diets, protein and high fat foods are not restricted; vegetables are limited. The main difference between Atkins and South Beach seems to be that the South Beach diet is less structured and emphasizes eating healthier, mostly unsaturated fats. The primary objections I’ve seen to these and similar diets — and this applies to everyone, not just nursing mothers — is simply the fact that they are not balanced and thus have the potential to make you feel unwell. These diets tend to be low in phytochemicals, antioxidants and folic acid. They also tend to be low in fiber and minerals (including calcium, magnesium, phosphorus & potassium), and the Atkins diet may be high in saturated fats. Because of this, long-term adherence to these diets may increase your risk for various health problems. Since some of the weight loss from these diets is simply due to water loss, dehydration is a risk if the dieter is not careful to drink plenty of water. Some moms have found that very low carb diets decrease milk supply. Going off the diet generally brings milk volume right back up again. This decrease in milk supply may be due to several factors: Dehydration. The sudden decrease in calories when mom goes on the diet. If a woman is used to a certain level of calories, an abrupt drop due to dieting (or illness) may reduce her milk supply. This sudden decrease in calories can tell mom’s body that she is in “starvation mode” and to conserve on all fronts (thus less of her body’s resources go into making milk). Insufficient caloric intake. With a low carb diet, many people are not nearly as hungry Continue reading >>

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Ketosis – Key To Human Babies’ Big Brains?

Prof Noakes is on trial for ‘advising’ a mom to wean her baby onto low carb, high fat foods. Could babies’ innate ketosis – a state more often associated with low-carb, high-fat diets – be an arrow in Prof Noakes’ defence’s quiver? By Tamzyn Murphy Campbell BSc, BSc Med(Hons) Human Nutrition and Dietetics, RD Did you know that human newborns and exclusively breastfed babies are in ketosis? 1 I am a dietitian, with two years of intensive postgraduate training in nutrition, and I didn’t realise this until just over a month ago. The fact that human babies are naturally in ketosis is an inconvenient truth because it implies that ketosis (which also occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet) is not only a natural metabolic state for human infants, but that it’s probably beneficial too. Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. 2 “Nature seldom does something without a reason, so it’s likely that ketosis may confer some kind of evolutionary advantage to human infants. Research suggests that it may be one of the main factors behind the development of the large human brain. ” A word on ketones and ketosis Ketosis is a metabolic state where your body uses fat as fuel in preference to carbohydrates – as occurs when fasting or eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. The body makes ketones from fat, when dietary glucose (from carbohydrates and sugar) is low. Ketones can be used as fuel to produce the energy your body and brain needs to function. The human brain only has two options for fuel: glucose or ketones. The other body orga Continue reading >>

Pruvit Keto Os And Bio Max Review Best Fat Loss Ketone Supplement

Pruvit Keto Os And Bio Max Review Best Fat Loss Ketone Supplement

0320SHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS is a DRINK that puts your body into ketosis in 59 minutes or less, without changing your diet! Puts your body into FAT BURNING MODE! Pruvit KETO OS and Keto Max Review: Does KETO OS Work? Prüvit’s proprietary formula, KETO OS, has been researched, tested, and is doctor approved. It is the first natural consumer product on the market to provide elevated blood ketone levels to the body. Profession athlete’s body builders, and every day people are using our products for fat loss, muscle preservation, appetite suppression, increased focus, better sleep and more! You simply mix Keto OS with water and drink it, 1-2 times a day to benefit from the amazing effects of Ketones in your body. What is Keto? Pruvit – KETO OS Review Save 10% on your order today by choosing today and smart ship option! No coupon code needed, discount is automatically applied for you! Have Questions? Click live chat at the bottom of the screen! What are the side effects of KETO OS? I get asked that question a lot. I realize it’s because most supplements out there have nasty side effects and you are often miserable while taking them. Often, at the same time you are dieting and starving yourself while on those supplements. Restricting calories makes you tired, hungry, gives you mental fog and makes you CRANKY and HANGRY! This is why many fail. You are depriving yourself and that is not a normal lifestyle or a long term solution. You will eventually give up, and all that you accomplished will be lost. Many end up bingeing on bad foods because they starved themselves for so long, quickly gaining all their weight back that they lost. Keto OS is different because it Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis Associated With Low-carbohydrate Diet In A Non-diabetic Lactating Woman: A Case Report

Ketoacidosis Associated With Low-carbohydrate Diet In A Non-diabetic Lactating Woman: A Case Report

Go to: Case presentation A 32-year-old white woman presented to our county hospital with a history of nausea, vomiting, heart palpitations, trembling and extremity spasms. She had started a strict LCHF diet, with an estimated carbohydrate intake of less than 20g per day, 10 days before admittance, lost 4 kilograms and had felt growing malaise. She was breastfeeding her son of 10 months of age. She continuously denied any alcohol or drug intake. She had a past medical history of hypothyreosis and had a family history of high blood pressure but not for diabetes. She took acetaminophen occasionally but no other medications. The initial examination in the emergency department revealed an unaffected woman with respiratory rate of 12 breaths per minute, oxygen saturation 96% on room air, body temperature 36.3°C, pulse 102 beats per minute and blood pressure of 110/80mmHg. Nothing abnormal was revealed on examination of her heart, lungs, abdomen and thyroid gland. An arterial blood gas was taken. It revealed pH 7.20, base excess (BE) −19, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) 2.8 kPa, glucose 3.8mmol/l and lactate 1.0mmol/l. Her blood ketones were 7.1mmol/l (reference 0 to 0.5mmol/l). No genetic testing of any kind was performed. The primary diagnosis was thought to be ketoacidosis due to starvation induced by the LCHF diet but blood samples for s-paracetamol, s-salicylate, s-ethanol, s-methanol, s-ethylene glycol, kidney function, diabetic autoantibodies, plasma cortisol (p-cortisol) and tests for thyroid function were added. She was admitted to our medical ward, given an intramuscular vitamin B injection and started on a 10% glucose infusion. In total 3L of glucose were infused, with an infusion rate of 125mL/hour, during 48 hours. The following day, after glucose inf Continue reading >>

Breastfeeding While In Ketosis: Round 2

Breastfeeding While In Ketosis: Round 2

Since my baby has been growing great, no issues breastfeeding, etc, and I found myself trending lower and lower in my daily carb counts; I decided I was going into full-on Keto again. I tend to average between 20 and 40 carbs per day. After a couple of days with this limit, I noticed Natalie wanted to nurse practically all day long. It seemed like a small drop in supply, as expected. However, the very next day my letdowns seemed normal, and I got the usual breaks between feedings. If some one else is consuming a high carb diet and wants to make the change with younger babies (~4+ months old), I would recommend starting at 100g carbs per day, and cutting 5g each day and monitoring your supply as you go along. More important than carb count while breastfeeding is your water and caloric intake. Be sure to be constantly drinking water; if you feel thirsty then you are already a little bit dehydrated. If you are having trouble with your calorie counts, I highly recommend MyFitnessPal. Great, intuitive site (and love the app!) with an extensive food database. Above all else, I recommend going gradually into ketosis and calorie restriction while breastfeeding, especially if your baby is young, and if you are not at home with the baby for unlimited nursing during the potential conversion. Check out my previous posts on breastfeeding while in ketosis - Low Carb or Keto While Breastfeeding Keto and Breastfeeding Introduction Keto While Breastfeeding: Days 1-5 Keto and the Breastfeeding Diet TIPS Continue reading >>

Newborn Hypoglycemia And Breastfeeding

Newborn Hypoglycemia And Breastfeeding

What is Hypoglycemia? “Hypoglycemia" is another name for “low blood sugar". Glucose is the body’s main fuel source. Your liver takes the carbohydrates you eat and turns it into glucose; the glucose is then sent into your blood stream and provides energy to the body. When the body’s blood glucose is low, it is called hypoglycemia. While a baby is in utero, he/she is continuously receiving glucose through the placenta. The baby will store some of this glucose as glycogen in the liver for after birth. This glycogen usually only lasts about 12 hours, in which time the baby will start producing his/her own glucose from the milk consumed. There is always a normal drop in blood sugar levels 1-2 hours after birth, this is as a result of the baby adapting outside the womb. It is important to get a second opinion on the diagnosis of hypoglycaemia in a baby. While one doctor may say that a baby has hypoglycaemia, another may say something different. Some babies may show low blood sugar levels, but may have absolutely no symptoms. Severe newborn Hypoglycaemia can deny the brain from fuel and cause seizures and even brain damage. Should a Hypoglycaemic Baby Breastfeed? Yes, in fact, it is really beneficial for a baby with Hypoglycaemia to breastfeed. Why? Breastfed babies produce more Ketones than formula fed babies. These ketones can be used as brain fuel. Breastfed babies can therefore tolerate lower levels of glucose without developing clinical symptoms. Interesting fact ~ Breastfed babies usually have a lower blood sugar level than their formula-fed counterparts. This is not an indication of a problem, but caregivers often take the physiology of artificially fed babies as “normal". What are the Newborn Hypoglycemia Symptoms? A high pitched cry. Weakness and fatigue. Si Continue reading >>

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