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Ketones Gout

Ketones

Ketones

Glucose (a type of sugar) is the body’s main energy source. What are Ketones? Glucose (a type of sugar) is the body’s main energy source. When the body can’t use glucose for energy, it uses fat instead. When fats are broken down for energy, chemicals called ketones appear in the blood and urine. This is known as ketosis. When the body is in ketosis it is actively using fat stores as an energy source. Ketosis can happen for one of two reasons: You do not have enough insulin in your blood. If there simply isn’t enough sugar available e.g. as a result of a low carbohydrate diet. Using fat as an energy source is perfectly natural. For example, if you are fasting either by choice (on a diet) or you are stranded without food, the body needs to be able to use stored fat for energy. But the process is controlled by insulin. A Ketogenic diet primarily works by lowering insulin levels, producing ketones and increasing fat burning. It is an effective weight loss diet that is now well supported by scientific evidence. Ketogenic diets can improve metabolic health by improving insulin function, reducing inflammation and promoting fat loss all of which greatly reduce the risk of or improve existing obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Suppressed appetite. Increased energy levels. Improved glucose control. Improved mood. Rapid weight loss (10% weight reduction in approximately 40 days). Ketones become a problem when you do not have enough insulin to control ketone production properly, such as with Type 1 diabetes. When too many ketones are produced too quickly they upset the delicate balance of the body’s chemistry and can lead to a problem called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is dangerous, but the good news is that you can usually stop it from developing. People wh Continue reading >>

A Ketogenic Diet, The Short Version

A Ketogenic Diet, The Short Version

A ketogenic diet (link is external) is one that encourages your body to rely less on sugar-based fuels and rather to turn to fat and ketones (produced in the liver by metabolizing fat) for fuel. The benefits of a consistently ketogenic diet are primarily recognized in the sphere of neurological problems, where there has been evidence of benefit in treating obesity, type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease A ketogenic diet is one that encourages your body to rely less on sugar-based fuels and rather to turn to fat and ketones (produced in the liver by metabolizing fat) for fuel. Some folks notice improved mood, sleep, mental focus, blood sugar regulation and reduction of general inflammation. Once you are adapted to a ketogenic diet, going in and out of ketosis intermittently is thought to yield some of the longevity, anti-inflammatory and cancer-fighting benefits previously attributed to calorie restricted diets. Staying in ketosis makes it easier for many people to maintain weight loss. For a good discussion of that process, as well as the research behind that observation, you can read this blog post from the "low carb dietitian" here (link is external). A ketogenic diet is one that encourages the body to burn fat for fuel and in that process fat burned in the liver produces ketones and a state of ketosis. We naturally burned fat and produced ketones for fuel when we were breast-feeding infants, if we were so lucky to have wise mothers! Since then, most bodies have lost the knack for burning ketones, which is too bad because our sugar-craving brains would be content with a lot less sugar if our bodies remembered how to supply our brains with ketones. (Ketosis is not to be confused with diabetic keto-acidosis which is life-thr Continue reading >>

Raspberry Ketones

Raspberry Ketones

Maybe you've heard the claim that raspberry ketone supplements can melt away fat and prevent weight gain -- even if your diet is high in fat. But what are they, and can they really do that? Raspberry ketones are natural chemicals that give raspberries their enticing aroma. When ketones are taken from raspberries, they can be used to add fragrance and flavor to things such as colas, ice cream, and cosmetics. Experts say that investing in a bottle of raspberry ketone supplements amounts to little more than wishful thinking. And it may or may not be harmful. In one small study, people who took 200 milligrams of raspberry ketones combined with 1,200 mg of vitamin C daily for 4 weeks lost weight and body fat. But the study did not follow good scientific methods. It doesn't show whether any benefit was from either the vitamin C or the raspberry ketones or from the combination. Until more is known, experts say you're better off holding onto your money. Instead, stick to a healthy, balanced diet and regular exercise. Both of those have been shown to be effective ways to manage weight. Raspberry ketones in food and cosmetics are generally considered safe. But no one knows what short- or long-term effect raspberry ketone supplements could have on your overall health. No study has been done to document potential side effects. There are also no studies that look at potential drug or food interactions. The fact that raspberry ketones chemically resemble other stimulants suggests the potential for certain side effects. And there are anecdotal reports of jitteriness, increased blood pressure, and rapid heartbeat among people taking raspberry ketone supplements. Without scientific evidence, no one can say what dosage of raspberry ketone supplements, if any, might be safe to take. Talk Continue reading >>

Gout And Ketogenic Diet

Gout And Ketogenic Diet

How Gout and the Ketogenic Diet Affects You A ketogenic diet is a diet with extremely low or no carbohydrates diet which makes the body go into a state known as ketosis. When the body is in the state of ketosis, the carbohydrates levels are low and this causes the blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins to break down fat to produce energy. Normally, the body relies on dietary energy sources as well as on the stored energy, which in most cases is always in the form of stored fats. When the body is exposed to ketogenic diet, it implies that the dietary carbohydrates will be kept very low, thus leaving the body to rely on stored fats to provide the primary source of fuel, a process which also ends up producing ketones from the stored fats. It should be noted, therefore, that a ketogenic diet is a high fat diet and not a high protein diet as has always been portrayed. Studies have suggested that high fat low carb ketogenic diet can help to alleviate the symptoms of gout. Gout symptoms are normally triggered by the NLRP3 inflammasome with the aid of neutrophilis. What happens is that the NLRP3 activates the 1L-1B pro-inflammatory cytokine which then leads to bouts of intense pain at the joints, fever, as well as the destruction of the joints. According to the studies conducted on rodent models, researchers induced gout in rats by injecting 1.25mg of monosodium urate on the knee, after which the knee’s thickness was measured and pathology analysis performed on the menisci and the ligaments. Human subjects were also used during the research where steroid free adults between the ages of 18 and 45 years and adults above the ages of 65 years. All the participants in the studies were not fasting at the time when there peripheral blood was collected. The studies concluded Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Vitamin C: The 101

Ketogenic Diet And Vitamin C: The 101

Written by Amber O’Hearn (MSc Computer Science). Find more of her writings at www.ketotic.org The Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) for different nutrients were developed on Western diets, and therefore, high-carb diets. Given that a ketogenic metabolism uses different metabolic pathways and induces cascades of drastically different metabolic and physiological effects, it would be astonishing if any of the RDAs are entirely applicable as is. One micronutrient that seems to be particularly warranting reassessment is vitamin C, because vitamin C is biochemically closely related to glucose. Most animals synthesize it themselves out of glucose. It shares cellular uptake receptors with glucose. Some argue that because we don’t make vitamin C, we need to ensure a large exogenous supply. I will argue the opposite: so long as we are eating a low-carb diet, we actually need less. On our way, we’ll briefly re-examine the relationship between vitamin C deficiency and insulin resistance. Table of Contents Micronutrients matter Micronutrients matter There are particular nutrients people need to develop normally and stay healthy, that we can’t make in our own bodies, and so we have to get them from our diets. We only started recognizing this at the end of the 19th century. Before that, the germ theory of disease was new and exciting, and we wanted to explain all maladies as infections. However, we ultimately learned that some diseases come from malnutrition. The best exemplifiers of this are when people or other animals die for lack of one specific ingredient, as in pellegra, beriberi, rickets, and scurvy. These ingredients were named, initially, “vitamines”, meaning vital amines, but when it turned out they weren’t all amines, the name was shortened to “vitamins” Continue reading >>

Can The Ketogenic (keto) Diet Protect Against Gout? Maybe…

Can The Ketogenic (keto) Diet Protect Against Gout? Maybe…

A recent study by researchers at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, and published in Cell Reports, suggests that a ketogenic (keto) diet could help to relieve the symptoms of gout. A ketogenic diet is one that encourages the body to utilize fat and ketones (produced in the liver by metabolizing fat) for fuel, rather than sugar-based fuels. In essence, it’s a strict very low carb, high fat, restricted protein diet and should not be confused with other low-carb diets such as the Atkins Diet. A true ketogenic diet puts the body into a state such that there’s insufficient glucose being produced to provide the energy the body needs. The outcome is that the body switches into a state where molecules called ‘ketones’ are generated, which are then used for energy. The study found that one of these ketones — the beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) — may alleviate urate crystal-induced gout. I came across this rather good summary of the study in Medical News Today... “The research team developed a new model of gout flares in rodents. As the researchers explain, these flares are triggered by the NLRP3 inflammasome. With the help of neutrophils – the most common type of white blood cell – NLRP3 activates the IL-1B pro-inflammatory cytokine, leading to episodes of intense pain, fever, and the destruction of joints. In the rodent model, researchers induced gout by injecting 1.25 milligrams of monosodium urate into rats’ knees. Researchers measured knee thickness and performed pathology analyses on the rats’ ligaments and menisci. The rodents were kept in pathogen-free conditions and fed a ketogenic diet 1 week before starting the experiments. Scientists measured the levels of BHB in the rodents’ blood. The scientists also examined human subjects. They recrui Continue reading >>

Exclusive: Interview With Ketone Expert Dr. Richard Veech – #299

Exclusive: Interview With Ketone Expert Dr. Richard Veech – #299

Why you should listen – For this special episode of Bulletproof Radio, we have an exclusive interview with Dr. Richard Veech. Dr. Veech is one of the world’s foremost experts on ketosis, and this is the first time he has EVER been on a podcast. He’s the Senior Researcher and Laboratory Chief at The National Institutes of Health and has worked for the last 47 years to understand the mechanics behind cellular energy and homeostasis. Dr. Veech is also the inventor of the ketone ester. On today’s episode, you’ll hear Dave and Dr. Veech discuss his ongoing research of ketones, including their potential dangers, the three different kinds, how to test for and raise them and how to use them as a vegan. Dr. Veech also talks to Dave about his work with George Cahill, General David Petraeus and several other significant figures over the course of his career. Enjoy the show! Follow Along with Interactive Transcripts! Speaker: Bulletproof Radio, a state of high performance. Dave: Hey, Dave Asprey with Bulletproof Radio. Today’s cool fact of the day is about Ketosis. Did you know that your alcohol tolerance is severely lower while you’re in Ketosis? There are a couple of reasons for that. The first is that the alcohol you drink when you’re in Ketosis will get metabolized immediately before your body keeps burning ketones for energy. The carbs in your system that are normally used to “soak up alcohol in the stomach” and slow down the intoxication process probably won’t be there if you are drinking while you’re in Ketosis. Not to mention, it’s difficult to stay in Ketosis while you’re drinking. You got to ask yourself, “Is it really worth it to have beer which is going to take you out of Ketosis or red wine which is going to take you out of Ketosis or vodk Continue reading >>

Gout And Keto

Gout And Keto

There’s loads more to it than simply blaming red meat or whatever is this weeks uric acid demon food. Some people with high uric acid never experience gout, whilst others with low levels get it often – and vice versa, it’s all about CLEARANCE and avoiding the feedback loop. Simply put – swapping out pig for fish won’t fix the clearance issue, it may reduce the build-up ever so slightly, but I seriously doubt it. Short version for ketards is ketones compete with uric acid for flushing, so that period where you are just acclimatising is when it’s most likely. Once you are using your ketones effectively the uric clearance thing isn’t an issue. The worst thing someone susceptible to gout can do is go back and forth from carby to keto and never fully adapt – this is gout limbo, and I’m guessing a good way to develop kidney stones in the long term. As it stands I consider it a catalyst feature – as in whatever susceptibility I have toward joint issues lays dormant until something ELSE happens. One catalyst that semi-correlates is food, each of the last few times I’ve experienced pain it’s been within a day or two of Thai food – but a confounder is that each time I also drank a bunch of beer too. Another is 12+ hours on a chair when I’m in research and writing mode that promotes poor circulation, so probably inducing some kind of mild thrombosis which is enough to start a cascade of events that end up in inflammation of a joint/nerve. And each time seems to be within days where I’ve experienced a twisting/whatever of an ankle/knee too for some reason. It’s a reflective problem which gets itself into a feedback loop. I’ve researched far and beyond the whole “it’s cos you eat red meat and wine brah” thing from years ago, it’s nothing to Continue reading >>

Sore Joints From Too Much Protein

Sore Joints From Too Much Protein

Eating a large amount of protein will not directly cause your joints to become sore. However, regularly consuming protein in excess of your body's need for the nutrient can contribute to the development of medical problems that result in sore joints. You can decrease your risk of these conditions by staying within the recommended daily allowance of protein specified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for your age and gender, and by choosing low-fat or plant-based protein sources. Video of the Day A high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet can cause your body's concentration of ketone compounds to rise as fat instead of glucose is metabolized for energy. High levels of ketones increase the risk of gout by increasing the amount of uric acid in your blood. Excess uric acid builds up in the joints -- particularly the joints in the feet, toes and knees -- and causes them to become painfully inflamed. People who suffer from gout are advised to limit the amount of animal-based protein they consume since meat, poultry and fish are rich in purines, the substances that the body breaks down into uric acid. MayoClinic.com recommends that you eat no more than 4 to 6 ounces of fish, poultry or meat daily if you have gout. Joint Inflammation Animal proteins like meat and eggs contain large amounts of omega-6 fatty acids. High intake of these fatty acids causes an increase in the activity of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2, two enzymes that are responsible for triggering inflammation within joints. Arthritis Today reports that eating too much omega-6 fatty acid-containing foods can increase the pain and inflammation that people with arthritis experience in their joints. To decrease the soreness, individuals with arthritis should focus on eating plant-based proteins in p Continue reading >>

Tag: Exogenous Ketones

Tag: Exogenous Ketones

Do you have the keys to your “fat lock-box?” Lock-boxes have always fascinated me. Lock-boxes with special keys are even more fascinating. The more I’ve learned about fat cells (adipocytes), the more I think about them as special fuel depositories or fat lock-boxes. Before the invention of refrigerators, fast-food, Bisquick and beer, our bodies preserved and reserved fat as a precious commodity. The body, when given fat with carbohydrates or excess protein, quickly places the fat into a lock-box for safe keeping. It does this for two reasons. First, the body can store fat very efficiently. Second, hormone signals stimulate fat storage when other fuel sources (carbohydrate & protein) are present in excess. The body can access this stored fuel only when the right presentation of hormonal keys are present. Fascinatingly, we now know from recent research, there are actually three types of lock-boxes for fat in the human body (white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue, and tan adipose tissue). The greatest challenge for the obesity doctor is getting into the fat lock-box. Some people’s boxes are like the “Jack-in-the-Box” you had as a child – just add a little exercise spinning the handle and the box pops open (These are those people that say, “Oh, just eat less and exercise and you’ll lose weight.”) For the majority of the people I see, it’s more like the lock above with a four or five part key required to turn the gears just right. (And, that key often only seems available on a quarter moon at midnight when the temperature is 72 degrees.) Fat cells, called adipocytes, require four, and possibly more, keys to open them up and access the fuel inside. Exercise is only one of those keys. However, exercise alone often fails. Over the last 18 months, I hav Continue reading >>

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

1: Kidney Stones, Gout, & Heart Palpitations On Keto

Today we officially kickoff this brand new podcast dedicated to answering listeners questions about the low-carb, moderate protein, high-fat, ketogenic diet. It’s called Keto Talk with Jimmy Moore & The Doc (now available to listen and subscribe on iTunes) featuring 10-year veteran health podcaster Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” and Arizona osteopath and bariatric physician Dr. Adam Nally from “Doc Muscles.” These two are a keto power pair ready to take on your most pressing questions about this way of eating. KEY QUOTE: “If you cheat on your ketogenic diet, then you are at risk of a kidney stone or gout. The point is if you’re gonna cheat, you’re gonna pay for it.” — Dr. Adam Nally Here’s what Jimmy and Adam talked about in Episode 1: – The beginning of this new podcast devoted to keto – How Adam uses ketogenic diets with his patients – Adam’s father who died early from diabetes issues – Follow Jimmy and Adam on Periscope – Whether keto creates or prevents kidney stones – Why it’s not a good idea to cheat on your low-carb diet – How cheating, not keto, is what leads to gout – Whether a ketogenic diet causes heart palpitations – How to best balance your electrolytes starting keto – The problem with caffeine on your cortisol levels WORLD’S 1ST REUSABLE BREATH KETONE ANALYZER NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipTHE WORLD’S FIRST EXOGENOUS KETONES SUPPLEMENT NOTICE OF DISCLOSURE: Paid sponsorshipLINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 1 – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Get the 2015 Ketonix breath ketone analyzer from Ketonix.com – SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR: Try the KETO//OS exogenous ketones supplement – Jimmy Moore from “Livin’ La Vida Low-Carb” – Dr. Adam Nally, DO from DocMuscles.com – Jimmy Moore on Periscope Continue reading >>

Gout And Low Carb

Gout And Low Carb

It’s occasionally claimed that low-carb or keto diets high in meat often cause gout. This does not appear to be true (nor does a low-carb diet have to be high in meat). However, there may possibly be a temporary increase in risk of gout during the first six weeks on a strict low-carb diet. After this initial time period, a low-carb diet is likely neutral, or even protective, when it comes to gout. Keep reading to find out what gout is and how to avoid it. What gout is Gout is a sudden and painful inflammation of a joint, most often at the base of the big toe (see image). It may also affect other joints, like heels, knees, wrists and finger joints. The cause of gout is elevated levels of uric acid in the blood, resulting in crystals depositing in the affected joint. Gout is more common in people who are overweight and have metabolic syndrome, and have thus become more common in recent decades, affecting about 6% of adult men and 2% of women (it’s even more common in older people). 1 Historically, it was known as “the disease of kings” or a “rich man’s disease”, but now everyone can afford… sugar. Meat and gout Gout has often been blamed on excessive consumption of meat. This is because the uric acid that causes gout is a breakdown product of purines, a building block of protein, that is highly concentrated in meat. However, avoiding meat seems to have little effect on the risk of gout, and even vegetarians get gout much more often than would be expected if this was the main cause. Eating more protein (like meat) seems to increase the excretion of uric acid from the kidneys, through the urine, thus not having much of an effect on the blood uric acid levels… or the risk of gout. Sugar and gout As there is a very strong connection between gout, obesity, ty Continue reading >>

Acidosis — The Deciding Factor

Acidosis — The Deciding Factor

Most doctors (and websites) will tell you that gout attacks are caused by having too much uric acid in your blood. That often is true, but there is more to the story because: You can have low blood uric acid levels and still have gout attacks; and You can have high blood uric acid levels and not have gout attacks! Uric acid is only one of many types of acid that can accumulate in body tissues. The combination of all of these can lead to an overall body condition known as Acidosis. With acidosis, body chemistry as a whole has become too acidic, making it more prone to gout attacks. Kidneys and pH Testing The kidneys are responsible for keeping blood uric acid levels within the normal range. But they can be overwhelmed and unable to keep up when you have acidosis — leading to gout attacks. Thus, keeping overall body acidity low should be the primary goal in a natural gout treatment plan. . . . Bert, I know all about sleep apnea having been diagnosed in 1998. I have used a CPAP since then, its a nuisance but very effective. Thank God I haven’t had a gout attack for a very long time, since we were first in touch. Keep up the good work. Best regards, Colm . . . Managing and Monitoring Body pH Several lifestyle choices can affect overall body acidity level, which I outline in my seven-day video program “Kill Your Gout FOR GOOD.” The best way to monitor your gout-killing progress is to perform a simple daily pH test at home, using an inexpensive test strip to measure the pH of either your saliva or urine. pH Testing Procedure Testing should be done first thing in the morning. For saliva testing, do not eat or drink anything, or brush your teeth beforehand. For urine testing, use your first urine of the morning. Collect your saliva or urine in a clean cup, dip the test Continue reading >>

Will Eating A Paleo Diet Cause Gout?

Will Eating A Paleo Diet Cause Gout?

This article is part of a special report on Red Meat. To see the other articles in this series, click here. A common question I get from readers is whether a Paleo-type diet will increase their risk for gout. Gout is a type of inflammatory arthritis caused by elevated levels of uric acid in the blood, forming crystal deposits in the joints, tendons, and surrounding tissue. Gout typically affects the feet in general and big toe joint specifically, and causes severe pain and swelling. In the past, gout was referred to as a “rich man’s disease”, as it typically affected the upper class and royalty who could afford “rich” foods like meat, sugar, and alcohol. Uric acid is a byproduct of the metabolism of purines, one of two types of nitrogenous bases that form the basic structure of DNA and RNA. While purines are present in all foods, they are typically higher in many of the foods emphasized on a nutrient-dense Paleo diet, such as red meat, turkey, organ meats, and certain types of fish and seafood. Patients with gout are often advised to reduce or eliminate these purine-rich foods with the goal of preventing excess uric acid production, thereby reducing the symptoms of gout. And research has confirmed the association between high purine intakes and acute gout attacks, suggesting that those diagnosed with gout would benefit from a reduction in purine-rich foods. (1, 2) So, do we need reconsider recommendations to eat foods like liver, sardines, red meat, mussels, and other traditional foods? Do these nutrient-dense, purine-rich foods really cause gout? Are those of us following a Paleo-style diet putting ourselves at greater risk for this painful, debilitating condition? Does eating meat and fish increase your risk for gout? Inflammation as a cause of gout attacks Continue reading >>

Study Identifies Natural Gout Remedy With This Diet

Study Identifies Natural Gout Remedy With This Diet

A new study published in the journal Cell Reports suggests that a ketogenic (high fat, low carb) diet may be helpful in treating the symptoms of gout. What is Gout? Gout is a form of inflammatory arthritis that results from an imbalance in the production and secretion of uric acid. Uric acid, a normal byproduct of metabolic processes, is typically dissolved in the blood and then excreted from the body through the urine. However, when the body is unable to properly break down uric acid, blood levels rise, and the excess is deposited in bodily tissues. The “needle-like” uric acid crystals irritate the area where they are deposited, triggering inflammation, swelling, and severe pain. When uric acid accumulates around the joints it is known as “tophi,” and can manifest as jelly like lumps under the skin. When uric acid crystals collect in the kidneys, it can result in kidney stones. The Role Of Ketosis Recent research out of the laboratory of Vishwa Deep Dixit, professor of comparative medicine and immunobiology at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, suggests that symptoms of gout may be managed with a ketogenic diet. Ketogenic diets are typically implemented for weight loss, or to treat childhood epilepsy. The diet involves a significant reduction of carbohydrate intake favoring moderate protein and high fat foods. This starves the central nervous system of glucose and prompts the liver to metabolise fats producing fatty acids and ketone bodies. This is referred to as the physiologic state of ketosis. The new study focuses on one of these ketone bodies in particular called beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB. The researchers suggest that BHB may be responsible for the noticeable effect of ketosis on the symptoms of gout. BHB, Inflammation, and Gout Episodes of immun Continue reading >>

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